Read: The Survival of the Bark Canoe

So, am I going to build a bark canoe? Probably not. Would I like to? Yes, I would actually. Working with my hands isn’t something I’ve done since my youth, and even then it was mostly manual labor jobs. But in some odd way I miss those too.

I loved this book for one reason. John McPhee is a GREAT writer. He can turn ANY story into something you can’t put down. Now, this is a book about canoes, as the title would suggest, but it’s also about Native Americans, nature, water, moose(or lack of) and its also about human nature.

Survival of the Bark Canoe follows the life’s work of one Henri Vaillancourt who does nothing but make bark canoes, by hand, one at a painful time. Now, it’s far from painful for him, in fact it’s a singular life purpose, but for you and I it would surely be the end of us.

The author, Mr. Vaillancourt and a few others, eventually head out on a long voyage, via canoe, which turns out to be more than anyone expects. The first paragraph on page 108 is worth buying this baby. I’m not going to share it here because it would not be kind to the author to do so, but I read and reread the paragraph many times. This one block of copy speaks to McPhee as a writer, and observer and someone with a good sense of humor. It is for this reason my next two books are also McPhee’s.

Get it, read it.

Source: http://shifter.media

STAR WARS Saturday

Star Wars – Sky Battle by Dylan Kowalski.


Keywords: star wars style destroyer x-wing tie fighter millennium falcon ships battle illustration concept art by dylan kowalski image portfolio sample from artstation.com Source: http://ift.tt/pzChxX

Tawny Chatmon Celebrates Cross Generational Beauty

Tawny Chatmon’s ethereal portraits celebrate the beauty of black childhood. Inspired by the Renaissance, Pre-Raphaelite, and Vienna Secession movements, she translates motifs from classical works to a contemporary setting, shifting the focus to those who have been underrepresented in Western art. Tawny begins with a photograph  — often featuring a family member or close friend — and reworks it through a series of superimpositions using digital techniques, collage, and gold leaf appliqué.

Tawny was born in Tokyo and now lives and works in the United States. She has a background in theatre, an endeavour that continues to inform her practice today. Most recently, she participated in the Art of Blackness exhibition in Chicago, an annual group exhibition that highlights the best of African-American art and design. Her works have also been featured in publications including Afropunk, Vice, and British Vogue.

What are the major themes you pursue in your work?

A major theme that I pursue in my work is celebrating the beauty of black childhood by creating portraits that are loosely inspired by works of art painted during the Vienna Secession, Pre-Raphaelite movement, and Renaissance period.

How did you first get interested in your medium, and what draws you to it specifically?

Before my father was diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2010, I had been a photographer for over 10 years. I mostly worked on small commercial shoots and children’s fashion editorials. He and I had talked about me photographing his battle with cancer, which we thought would end with him being victorious over it, but instead, I ended up capturing my father losing his battle to cancer. Capturing his fight changed what I wanted to do with my camera.

What draws me to creating the work that I do, is my desire to make sure I’m “saying something” with my work, that I’m sending a clear message.

How has your style and practice changed over the years?

Within the past 2 years, my practice has changed significantly. I went from only focusing on a singular medium (photography) that showcased ethereal children, to creating more multifaceted works using photography as the first layer and adding elements such as gold leaf, collage, digital illustration, illustration etc. to enhance my work to make a meaningful statement.

Can you walk us through your process? Do you begin with a sketch, or do you just jump in? How long do you spend on one work? How do you know when it is finished?

I begin with an idea. Usually something I’ve seen that’s inspired me. I’ll then schedule a portrait sitting, as photographs are the first layer. Usually my subjects are someone that I am close to in some way. My daughters, son, God daughter, a relative, or a model that I’ve worked with in the past. I work more comfortably this way.

After that is where most of the magic begins. I digitally manipulate the portraits and unite them with other photographic components. Thereafter, I may overlap anything from gold leaf, paint, digital collage, vintage botanical illustrations,  and/or digital/illustration. I have no idea HOW I know when it’s finished, I just do. I will keep adding and sometimes removing until I am satisfied that I’m done. After days or even weeks of post-production, there comes a little moment where I’ll say “Yes! That’s it!”

What are some of your favorite experiences as an artist?

Having a mother tell me that my work changed her daughter’s life.

If you could only have one piece of art in your life, what would it be?

Aside from any piece done by my children, if I could have any other piece, it would be anything from a Nick Cave instillation!

Source: http://ift.tt/2wqWCpS

Tawny Chatmon Celebrates Cross Generational Beauty

Tawny Chatmon’s ethereal portraits celebrate the beauty of black childhood. Inspired by the Renaissance, Pre-Raphaelite, and Vienna Secession movements, she translates motifs from classical works to a contemporary setting, shifting the focus to those who have been underrepresented in Western art. Tawny begins with a photograph  — often featuring a family member or close friend — and reworks it through a series of superimpositions using digital techniques, collage, and gold leaf appliqué.

Tawny was born in Tokyo and now lives and works in the United States. She has a background in theatre, an endeavour that continues to inform her practice today. Most recently, she participated in the Art of Blackness exhibition in Chicago, an annual group exhibition that highlights the best of African-American art and design. Her works have also been featured in publications including Afropunk, Vice, and British Vogue.

What are the major themes you pursue in your work?

A major theme that I pursue in my work is celebrating the beauty of black childhood by creating portraits that are loosely inspired by works of art painted during the Vienna Secession, Pre-Raphaelite movement, and Renaissance period.

How did you first get interested in your medium, and what draws you to it specifically?

Before my father was diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2010, I had been a photographer for over 10 years. I mostly worked on small commercial shoots and children’s fashion editorials. He and I had talked about me photographing his battle with cancer, which we thought would end with him being victorious over it, but instead, I ended up capturing my father losing his battle to cancer. Capturing his fight changed what I wanted to do with my camera.

What draws me to creating the work that I do, is my desire to make sure I’m “saying something” with my work, that I’m sending a clear message.

How has your style and practice changed over the years?

Within the past 2 years, my practice has changed significantly. I went from only focusing on a singular medium (photography) that showcased ethereal children, to creating more multifaceted works using photography as the first layer and adding elements such as gold leaf, collage, digital illustration, illustration etc. to enhance my work to make a meaningful statement.

Can you walk us through your process? Do you begin with a sketch, or do you just jump in? How long do you spend on one work? How do you know when it is finished?

I begin with an idea. Usually something I’ve seen that’s inspired me. I’ll then schedule a portrait sitting, as photographs are the first layer. Usually my subjects are someone that I am close to in some way. My daughters, son, God daughter, a relative, or a model that I’ve worked with in the past. I work more comfortably this way.

After that is where most of the magic begins. I digitally manipulate the portraits and unite them with other photographic components. Thereafter, I may overlap anything from gold leaf, paint, digital collage, vintage botanical illustrations,  and/or digital/illustration. I have no idea HOW I know when it’s finished, I just do. I will keep adding and sometimes removing until I am satisfied that I’m done. After days or even weeks of post-production, there comes a little moment where I’ll say “Yes! That’s it!”

What are some of your favorite experiences as an artist?

Having a mother tell me that my work changed her daughter’s life.

If you could only have one piece of art in your life, what would it be?

Aside from any piece done by my children, if I could have any other piece, it would be anything from a Nick Cave instillation!

Source: http://ift.tt/2wqWCpS

Tawny Chatmon Celebrates Cross Generational Beauty

Tawny Chatmon’s ethereal portraits celebrate the beauty of black childhood. Inspired by the Renaissance, Pre-Raphaelite, and Vienna Secession movements, she translates motifs from classical works to a contemporary setting, shifting the focus to those who have been underrepresented in Western art. Tawny begins with a photograph  — often featuring a family member or close friend — and reworks it through a series of superimpositions using digital techniques, collage, and gold leaf appliqué.

Tawny was born in Tokyo and now lives and works in the United States. She has a background in theatre, an endeavour that continues to inform her practice today. Most recently, she participated in the Art of Blackness exhibition in Chicago, an annual group exhibition that highlights the best of African-American art and design. Her works have also been featured in publications including Afropunk, Vice, and British Vogue.

What are the major themes you pursue in your work?

A major theme that I pursue in my work is celebrating the beauty of black childhood by creating portraits that are loosely inspired by works of art painted during the Vienna Secession, Pre-Raphaelite movement, and Renaissance period.

How did you first get interested in your medium, and what draws you to it specifically?

Before my father was diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2010, I had been a photographer for over 10 years. I mostly worked on small commercial shoots and children’s fashion editorials. He and I had talked about me photographing his battle with cancer, which we thought would end with him being victorious over it, but instead, I ended up capturing my father losing his battle to cancer. Capturing his fight changed what I wanted to do with my camera.

What draws me to creating the work that I do, is my desire to make sure I’m “saying something” with my work, that I’m sending a clear message.

How has your style and practice changed over the years?

Within the past 2 years, my practice has changed significantly. I went from only focusing on a singular medium (photography) that showcased ethereal children, to creating more multifaceted works using photography as the first layer and adding elements such as gold leaf, collage, digital illustration, illustration etc. to enhance my work to make a meaningful statement.

Can you walk us through your process? Do you begin with a sketch, or do you just jump in? How long do you spend on one work? How do you know when it is finished?

I begin with an idea. Usually something I’ve seen that’s inspired me. I’ll then schedule a portrait sitting, as photographs are the first layer. Usually my subjects are someone that I am close to in some way. My daughters, son, God daughter, a relative, or a model that I’ve worked with in the past. I work more comfortably this way.

After that is where most of the magic begins. I digitally manipulate the portraits and unite them with other photographic components. Thereafter, I may overlap anything from gold leaf, paint, digital collage, vintage botanical illustrations,  and/or digital/illustration. I have no idea HOW I know when it’s finished, I just do. I will keep adding and sometimes removing until I am satisfied that I’m done. After days or even weeks of post-production, there comes a little moment where I’ll say “Yes! That’s it!”

What are some of your favorite experiences as an artist?

Having a mother tell me that my work changed her daughter’s life.

If you could only have one piece of art in your life, what would it be?

Aside from any piece done by my children, if I could have any other piece, it would be anything from a Nick Cave instillation!

Source: http://ift.tt/2wqWCpS

Tawny Chatmon Celebrates Cross Generational Beauty

Tawny Chatmon’s ethereal portraits celebrate the beauty of black childhood. Inspired by the Renaissance, Pre-Raphaelite, and Vienna Secession movements, she translates motifs from classical works to a contemporary setting, shifting the focus to those who have been underrepresented in Western art. Tawny begins with a photograph  — often featuring a family member or close friend — and reworks it through a series of superimpositions using digital techniques, collage, and gold leaf appliqué.

Tawny was born in Tokyo and now lives and works in the United States. She has a background in theatre, an endeavour that continues to inform her practice today. Most recently, she participated in the Art of Blackness exhibition in Chicago, an annual group exhibition that highlights the best of African-American art and design. Her works have also been featured in publications including Afropunk, Vice, and British Vogue.

What are the major themes you pursue in your work?

A major theme that I pursue in my work is celebrating the beauty of black childhood by creating portraits that are loosely inspired by works of art painted during the Vienna Secession, Pre-Raphaelite movement, and Renaissance period.

How did you first get interested in your medium, and what draws you to it specifically?

Before my father was diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2010, I had been a photographer for over 10 years. I mostly worked on small commercial shoots and children’s fashion editorials. He and I had talked about me photographing his battle with cancer, which we thought would end with him being victorious over it, but instead, I ended up capturing my father losing his battle to cancer. Capturing his fight changed what I wanted to do with my camera.

What draws me to creating the work that I do, is my desire to make sure I’m “saying something” with my work, that I’m sending a clear message.

How has your style and practice changed over the years?

Within the past 2 years, my practice has changed significantly. I went from only focusing on a singular medium (photography) that showcased ethereal children, to creating more multifaceted works using photography as the first layer and adding elements such as gold leaf, collage, digital illustration, illustration etc. to enhance my work to make a meaningful statement.

Can you walk us through your process? Do you begin with a sketch, or do you just jump in? How long do you spend on one work? How do you know when it is finished?

I begin with an idea. Usually something I’ve seen that’s inspired me. I’ll then schedule a portrait sitting, as photographs are the first layer. Usually my subjects are someone that I am close to in some way. My daughters, son, God daughter, a relative, or a model that I’ve worked with in the past. I work more comfortably this way.

After that is where most of the magic begins. I digitally manipulate the portraits and unite them with other photographic components. Thereafter, I may overlap anything from gold leaf, paint, digital collage, vintage botanical illustrations,  and/or digital/illustration. I have no idea HOW I know when it’s finished, I just do. I will keep adding and sometimes removing until I am satisfied that I’m done. After days or even weeks of post-production, there comes a little moment where I’ll say “Yes! That’s it!”

What are some of your favorite experiences as an artist?

Having a mother tell me that my work changed her daughter’s life.

If you could only have one piece of art in your life, what would it be?

Aside from any piece done by my children, if I could have any other piece, it would be anything from a Nick Cave instillation!

Source: http://ift.tt/2wqWCpS

Greek landscapes

landscapes

In this stagnant space, in this gap between eras, Greek landscapes look bizarre, cut off the real world, pending for their unknown fate, as a visualization of the inner state of their inhabitants. The horizon is hidden, preventing us to see what’s yet to come. Could this blurry atmosphere be smoke from a violent riot, the Sahara desert’s dust cloud or maybe, is it just a morning fog?
Empty highways, solar panel fields, constructions left unfinished, rotten watermelons and torn flags seem stuck in an intermediate state, portraying the current situation, like distorted symbols of a bygone era of growth. In this serene rural scenery, far away from the city’s battlefield, there is a subtle feeling of uncannyness. The depicted structures stand as a kind of neo-ruins, all of them have a part of the story to tell, but we have to look closer to discover it. Although photographed as landscapes, it’s not nature, but the human presence through its absence, that is the subject of the photographs.
Found in this situation of not being able to look forward while the past seems already distant and out of reach, disorientation is what one feels. Relying on expectations is not a choice , neither memories can provide a shelter. There is nothing certain except the situation itself.
About the author:
Maria Mavropoulou was born in 1989 and she lives and works in Athens, Greece.
She is an Athens School of Fine Arts graduate (2014) having attended courses of painting, sculpture and photography. Currently she is getting her Master in Fine Arts. Her work has been presented in exhibitions in Greece and abroad. She is member of the collective of artists Depression Era that inhabit the urban and social landscapes of the crisis in Greece.

The post Greek landscapes appeared first on Positive Magazine.

Source: http://ift.tt/1lFZ1Bi

Weekend Round-Up: A Confusing Sport, Some Famous Covers, And A Very Crowded Island

Island1.jpg?ixlib=rails 1.1

Two weeks in a row means we’re back on a roll again, right? Here is this week’s installment of Weekend Round-Up, where we bring you a selection of stories from across the internet that we think you absolutely need to check out. This week we’ve got some real stand0uts too.

Enjoy.

A Times Photographer’s Journey Home To The Winter Olympics – The New York Times

Photography is so much more than showing up and snapping away – and this look at Chang W. Lee’s images from the Olympics, along with his personal journey and approach, is a great example of that. Consider that Lee, for instance, scouted the Olympic ice skating venue a year in advance; and then look at the lead photo – the athleticism, precision, and beauty of the sport are captured perfectly.

– Will Holloway, Director of Content

The Secret of Success In A Chilly Classic Car Market – The New York Times

One of the markets I follow closely as an enthusiast is that of collectible cars. There is obviously a lot of overlap with what’s happening with watches, and this story provides a nice overview and just how chilly things are after years of frantic growth. When vintage Ferrari prices jumped upwards of 62% in the matter of 12 months, now they’ll be lucky to see 2% growth. It feels a bit like what we might see with some vintage Rolex watches – or not.

– Benjamin Clymer, Founder & CEO

20 Iconic New Yorker Covers – Literary Hub

There is perhaps no institution in the magazine world more widely recognizable and celebrated than the cover of The New Yorker. At once witty and sophisticated, yet just as often absurd and satirical, the magazine’s cover is always shrewdly in tune with the cultural zeitgeist. Take a look back to some of the most iconic covers in the magazine’s history and hear from the artists who created them. 

– Greyson Korhonen, Digital Producer

Physicists Still Don’t Know What Puts the Curl in Curling – The New Yorker

In this timely New Yorker story, Alan Burdick explores the science of curling, a poplular Olympic sport whose physics – the very essence of how it works – remains unsolved by science. The tendency of a curling stone to veer right or left depending on how it’s rotated is an open mystery. Similar objects – say, a beer glass spun down a slick bar – actually curve the other way, the story says.

– Jon Bues, Senior Editor

Is This the Most Crowded Island in the World? – Longreads

While casually browsing around Google Earth, Alex MacGregor, an amateur geographer, happened to stumble upon a tiny and seemingly unheard of island in Haiti that, from a bird’s eye view, appeared to be incredibly populated. He began to wonder – could this seemingly undiscovered island be the world’s most crowded place? 

– David Aujero, Digital Producer

Source: http://ift.tt/1IiKaDm

Weekend Round-Up: A Confusing Sport, Some Famous Covers, And A Very Crowded Island

Island1.jpg?ixlib=rails 1.1

Two weeks in a row means we’re back on a roll again, right? Here is this week’s installment of Weekend Round-Up, where we bring you a selection of stories from across the internet that we think you absolutely need to check out. This week we’ve got some real stand0uts too.

Enjoy.

A Times Photographer’s Journey Home To The Winter Olympics – The New York Times

Photography is so much more than showing up and snapping away – and this look at Chang W. Lee’s images from the Olympics, along with his personal journey and approach, is a great example of that. Consider that Lee, for instance, scouted the Olympic ice skating venue a year in advance; and then look at the lead photo – the athleticism, precision, and beauty of the sport are captured perfectly.

– Will Holloway, Director of Content

The Secret of Success In A Chilly Classic Car Market – The New York Times

One of the markets I follow closely as an enthusiast is that of collectible cars. There is obviously a lot of overlap with what’s happening with watches, and this story provides a nice overview and just how chilly things are after years of frantic growth. When vintage Ferrari prices jumped upwards of 62% in the matter of 12 months, now they’ll be lucky to see 2% growth. It feels a bit like what we might see with some vintage Rolex watches – or not.

– Benjamin Clymer, Founder & CEO

20 Iconic New Yorker Covers – Literary Hub

There is perhaps no institution in the magazine world more widely recognizable and celebrated than the cover of The New Yorker. At once witty and sophisticated, yet just as often absurd and satirical, the magazine’s cover is always shrewdly in tune with the cultural zeitgeist. Take a look back to some of the most iconic covers in the magazine’s history and hear from the artists who created them. 

– Greyson Korhonen, Digital Producer

Physicists Still Don’t Know What Puts the Curl in Curling – The New Yorker

In this timely New Yorker story, Alan Burdick explores the science of curling, a poplular Olympic sport whose physics – the very essence of how it works – remains unsolved by science. The tendency of a curling stone to veer right or left depending on how it’s rotated is an open mystery. Similar objects – say, a beer glass spun down a slick bar – actually curve the other way, the story says.

– Jon Bues, Senior Editor

Is This the Most Crowded Island in the World? – Longreads

While casually browsing around Google Earth, Alex MacGregor, an amateur geographer, happened to stumble upon a tiny and seemingly unheard of island in Haiti that, from a bird’s eye view, appeared to be incredibly populated. He began to wonder – could this seemingly undiscovered island be the world’s most crowded place? 

– David Aujero, Digital Producer

Source: http://ift.tt/1IiKaDm

Weekend Round-Up: A Confusing Sport, Some Famous Covers, And A Very Crowded Island

Island1.jpg?ixlib=rails 1.1

Two weeks in a row means we’re back on a roll again, right? Here is this week’s installment of Weekend Round-Up, where we bring you a selection of stories from across the internet that we think you absolutely need to check out. This week we’ve got some real stand0uts too.

Enjoy.

A Times Photographer’s Journey Home To The Winter Olympics – The New York Times

Photography is so much more than showing up and snapping away – and this look at Chang W. Lee’s images from the Olympics, along with his personal journey and approach, is a great example of that. Consider that Lee, for instance, scouted the Olympic ice skating venue a year in advance; and then look at the lead photo – the athleticism, precision, and beauty of the sport are captured perfectly.

– Will Holloway, Director of Content

The Secret of Success In A Chilly Classic Car Market – The New York Times

One of the markets I follow closely as an enthusiast is that of collectible cars. There is obviously a lot of overlap with what’s happening with watches, and this story provides a nice overview and just how chilly things are after years of frantic growth. When vintage Ferrari prices jumped upwards of 62% in the matter of 12 months, now they’ll be lucky to see 2% growth. It feels a bit like what we might see with some vintage Rolex watches – or not.

– Benjamin Clymer, Founder & CEO

20 Iconic New Yorker Covers – Literary Hub

There is perhaps no institution in the magazine world more widely recognizable and celebrated than the cover of The New Yorker. At once witty and sophisticated, yet just as often absurd and satirical, the magazine’s cover is always shrewdly in tune with the cultural zeitgeist. Take a look back to some of the most iconic covers in the magazine’s history and hear from the artists who created them. 

– Greyson Korhonen, Digital Producer

Physicists Still Don’t Know What Puts the Curl in Curling – The New Yorker

In this timely New Yorker story, Alan Burdick explores the science of curling, a poplular Olympic sport whose physics – the very essence of how it works – remains unsolved by science. The tendency of a curling stone to veer right or left depending on how it’s rotated is an open mystery. Similar objects – say, a beer glass spun down a slick bar – actually curve the other way, the story says.

– Jon Bues, Senior Editor

Is This the Most Crowded Island in the World? – Longreads

While casually browsing around Google Earth, Alex MacGregor, an amateur geographer, happened to stumble upon a tiny and seemingly unheard of island in Haiti that, from a bird’s eye view, appeared to be incredibly populated. He began to wonder – could this seemingly undiscovered island be the world’s most crowded place? 

– David Aujero, Digital Producer

Source: http://ift.tt/1IiKaDm