Porcelain Cup & Bottle Sets Inspired by Kokeshi Dolls

The 400-year old Japanese art of creating kokeshi dolls is a time-honored tradition that exemplifies the joy and beauty of handmade craft. These traditional wooden figurines, with an enlarged head and cylindrical body, are made from woodturning solid blocks and carving away at the wood.

On a trip to Japan, Seattle-based designer Michael Kritzer encountered kokeshi dolls and was inspired by the craftsmanship, but also the meaningful connection between object and person. He decided to collaborate with a group of Japanese potters to create a unique line of porcelain cup & bottle sets.

The Ototi Dorinku Dolls are made in Hasami, a town in Nagasaki that’s known for their porcelain, and formed from Japanese slip molding. The bottles come in two styles – rounded and tall – and can be paired with either tea or sake cups, both of which come with island-like bulges in the middle that allow the cups to sit on the neck of the bottles. When stored, the bottle and cup mimics the shape and form of kokeshi dolls.

If you’re interested in purchasing a set or two (the cups and bottles can be mixed and matched) get in touch with ototi. They plan to begin shipping the sets at the end of the year.

Source: http://ift.tt/zlrR8Y

A Colorful Modern Home Designed with Usability in Mind

Every family home should have a little bit of playfulness to it. In this design from Nordico, it is impossible to deny that a little bit of childlike wonder and whimsy have informed the still stylish design. From a pretty pink sofa with a playful design to a modern interpretation of a bean bag chair, this is a living space that’s actually designed with living in mind. Instead of making visitors afraid to touch anything, this fun and quirky home invites you to kick off your shoes and stay for a while. Step inside and get comfortable.

Walking into the bright, spacious living room the importance of color is immediately apparent.

It is difficult to take your eyes off the molded pink sofa that invites with the eye but looks a bit offputting in terms of comfort at first.

The open and spacious floorplan leaves plenty of room for a duo of simple coffee tables.

Indoor house plants scattered about add yet another layer of color.

The bright blue accent wall is a beautiful color — not too overpower nor too pastel.

A modern floor lamp makes for easy reading when the overhead track lights are off.

The central entertainment center doubles as extensive storage, which is always a needed feature.

The flat panel television is actually on a swivel so the living room can be used from either side for television — or not.

In fact, it can even swivel to face the dining area, which is quite convenient.

The larger furnishings can also be moved around easily so the room can be reconfigured at the drop of a hat.

A small dining area and kitchen leave plenty of floor space open for the central living area.

The Flos Mod 265 Wall Lamp is a creative lighting solution since it does not take up any floor space and can fold away when necessary.

Unique wall shelves are another practical addition, perfect for displaying those personal style trinkets. On the floor, pebble pillows sit next to the modern About a Chair both of which have their own style and whimsy.

A Swiss cheese plant is a natural choice for the unique plant stands chosen.

The natural wood grain from the ceiling, floor, and features like the entertainment center all works well together without completely matching.

White walls are always a good choice when the furniture brings in so much color.

Comfortable reading chairs like the modular gray versions featured in this space are a great way to encourage reading in anyone.

Here, the chair is shown without use of the matching ottoman.

Color in the sideboard doesn’t quite live in the same family as the pinks and blues throughout, but it stills works.

In the kitchen, things are kept simple with white cabinetry and wood countertops.

Scandinavian style chairs like these ones should come as no surprise from a company called Nordico.

Above the chairs, the use of dining room pendants like these makes sense. The adorable deer lights have been featured before in our post Lighting Inspired by Living Beings.

In an eclectic home like this, you must be able to find even unique trash cans.

In the age of mobile phones, clocks are all but obsolete, unless they are interesting to look at like this kitchen clock.

White subway tile and a robin’s egg blue door give the bathroom its own serenity.

The passageway into the home barely betrays the fun you will find inside.

Related Posts:

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DIY Donut Bar Stand from IKEA Lack table

I was graduating from business school in June and wanted to do something different for my graduation party. I love donuts and I wanted to make a display for them and found a few ideas on Pinterest. I found an old LACK table at home that was a little bit scratched and no longer in use so I decided to paint it and turn it into a donut bar stand.

IKEA LACK side table

Photo: IKEA.com

I had a tester paint from the year before which worked out great. Small metallic gold triangles in the corners of the table made it look a little more glam.

Measure where the rods should go

I had some paper straws left from a birthday. They was perfect for the project to be used as rods for the donuts to hang from.

Measure where the rods should go

I measured the table so that all the holes were evenly spread out

Straw

I cut one straw and put it into another for extra strength to hold up the donuts.

Insert straws as rods for the donut bar stand

My husband helped me put the straws into the holes.

Donut bar stand with rods for donuts

The stand looked like this when the straws were in. The inflatable donut is a can holder for a hot tub or pool. I bought it in Glasgow. (Similar here)

Paper doilies

I found these paper doilies at a local shop, perfect size for donuts.

DIY Donut Bar Stand from IKEA Lack table

DIY Donut Bar Stand from IKEA Lack table

Perfect place for a donut to hang out :)

DIY Donut Bar Stand from IKEA Lack table

DIY Donut Bar Stand from IKEA Lack table

The final outcome with my favorite Krispy Kreme Original Glazed.

See full instructions on my blog. Or follow my snapchat hannsythora and find me on Instagram @hannathora88.

~ by Hanna Þóra

The post DIY Donut Bar Stand from IKEA Lack table appeared first on IKEA Hackers.

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Bring a Loupe: A Rare Heuer Carrera ‘Dato 45’ Ref. 3147N, An Early Breguet Type XX In Yellow Gold, A Crazy Mido Robot, And More

Carrera cover 4.jpg?ixlib=rails 1.1

This week’s Bring A Loupe has its fair share of chronographs, and more. We’re featuring a very special Heuer Carrera "Dato 45," bearing the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Logo on its dial. There is also a non-vintage Breguet Type XX: the reference 3800BA in gold, which comes full set here. We round out our selection with a 1970s Breitling TransOcean, and a fantastic Mido Robot. This is your Bring A Loupe for July 28, 2017.

Breguet Type XX In Yellow Gold

The Breguet Type XX is often overlooked when considering notable modern chronographs, despite its strong historical roots and flyback complication. The Type 20 (note here the different numbering) was first released in 1954, in response to a specification issued by the French Army. It was produced until the late 1980s; the latter 2nd generation had a compressor case, larger than the original 38mm one. And the story did not stop there, as Breguet relaunched this icon in 1994 under the Type XX moniker (sort of a new name, but not really).

The reference 3800BA here belongs to the very first batch released, and it shows. The most obvious clue comes from the dial that presents the SWISS signature (it would later be T-Swiss-T); the old Breguet logo without a horizontal stroke on the signature; and 5 minute increments in the sub-register (later those numerals simply disappear). The bezel, crown, second hand are also slightly different in this rare yellow gold piece, of which only 150 were made. And as a bonus, it comes full set with original box and papers.

A German dealer is offering this rare first series Breguet Type XX for 11,000 Euros (or around $12,840).

Heuer Carrera ‘Dato 45’ Reference 3147, With Indianapolis Motor Speedway Logo

Heuer Carrera Reference 3147

There is a lot to love about the Heuer Carrera Dato 45, starting with its interesting twist on the date window positioning. Of course, it gets even better when the dial sports the golden “Wings & Wheels” logo of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway on the dial. This is actually the second time we’ve featured such a watch in less than two months, but truthfully these are hard to come by, as they were only retailed at the Speedway.

The seller emphasizes the provenance of this reference 3147N, which came from an estate in Indianapolis that included a lot of other Indy 500 memorabilia; its former owner worked at the Speedway during the Indy 500 race. The watch looks in better than honest condition, with the necessary aging that proves that the dial does not come from new stock. The hands are original, and have a very nice patina, which matches the lume plots. Lastly, the manual winding Landeron 189 chronograph movement is said to work well, although the pusher action is described as a bit sluggish.

Heuer Carrera Dato 45

A seasoned Heuer collector is offering this superb Heuer Carrera "Dato 45" for $65,000, but will also consider offers.

Breitling TransOcean Reference 2119 With Original Papers

Breitling Transocean Reference 2119

Breitling first released the TransOcean in 1958 (could an anniversary edition be in the works for next year?) as a sturdy timepiece: "A watch of value to be prized" as the original advertisements said. The first time-only watches were indeed heavily highlighted in Breitling advertising, alongside the Navitimer, the Chronomat, and the Unitime. The merits of the TransOcean were plentiful; it was a chronometer-certified automatic time-only watch (with or without a date window) and its case was described as anti-magnetic and "superwatertight" (a lovely word). 

The 1970s brought a more colorful interpretation of the TransOcean as the present chronograph reference 2119 shows. The crown on the left side gives a clue as to which automatic chronograph caliber that the case houses, which is confirmed by "Chrono-Matic" on the dial. Breitling was indeed involved in Project 99 with its rival Heuer, and was therefore among the first brands to benefit from the revolutionary caliber 11. The automatic TransOcean reference 2119 later evolved as the reference 2129, but it is worth noting that a manual-wound version of this watch also existed as the reference 7102, with a three-counter configuration. This watch comes with its original guarantee papers and manual, both coming in the yellow color that the marketing maverick Georges Caspari had chosen in the 1950s to differentiate Breitling advertising (interestingly, he also played a key role in Breitling’s survival as he introduced Willy Breitling to Sicura owner and future buyer, Ernest Schneider, in 1979).

Breitling Transocean 2119 papers

You can find this Breitling TransOcean reference 2119 listed for 3,500 Euros (or around $4,088).

Mido Robot Display Clock

Mido Robot

The Mido Robot might be one of the cutest horological mascots ever created. Mido chose this symbol in 1939, and featured it extensively in its advertising over the following decades, to underline the technical prowess of its watches. Yet, it was not only about attractive drawings; the smiling robot actually came alive in numerous clocks that were present at points of sale. 

Few of these have survived, so it is always a big thing to see an intact one up for sale, especially with a working electric clock. The robot (also nicknamed "Robi" to make the whole thing even cuter) you see here advertised the Powerwind models back in the 1950s, an important automatic line for Mido. The seller mentions a 23 inch height; it is described as in good working condition, without an cracks or broken part. The electric motor is also shown, and so is the cable with a tiny US plug at its end.

Mido Robot clock

This Mido Robot "Robi" is currently listed on Ebay for $2,250, slightly higher than the previous examples sold but this piece is a true rarity, especially in good working condition.

Source: http://ift.tt/1IiKaDm

Bring a Loupe: A Rare Heuer Carrera ‘Dato 45’ Ref. 3147N, An Early Breguet Type XX In Yellow Gold, A Crazy Mido Robot, And More

Carrera cover 4.jpg?ixlib=rails 1.1

This week’s Bring A Loupe has its fair share of chronographs, and more. We’re featuring a very special Heuer Carrera "Dato 45," bearing the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Logo on its dial. There is also a non-vintage Breguet Type XX: the reference 3800BA in gold, which comes full set here. We round out our selection with a 1970s Breitling TransOcean, and a fantastic Mido Robot. This is your Bring A Loupe for July 28, 2017.

Breguet Type XX In Yellow Gold

The Breguet Type XX is often overlooked when considering notable modern chronographs, despite its strong historical roots and flyback complication. The Type 20 (note here the different numbering) was first released in 1954, in response to a specification issued by the French Army. It was produced until the late 1980s; the latter 2nd generation had a compressor case, larger than the original 38mm one. And the story did not stop there, as Breguet relaunched this icon in 1994 under the Type XX moniker (sort of a new name, but not really).

The reference 3800BA here belongs to the very first batch released, and it shows. The most obvious clue comes from the dial that presents the SWISS signature (it would later be T-Swiss-T); the old Breguet logo without a horizontal stroke on the signature; and 5 minute increments in the sub-register (later those numerals simply disappear). The bezel, crown, second hand are also slightly different in this rare yellow gold piece, of which only 150 were made. And as a bonus, it comes full set with original box and papers.

A German dealer is offering this rare first series Breguet Type XX for 11,000 Euros (or around $12,840).

Heuer Carrera ‘Dato 45’ Reference 3147, With Indianapolis Motor Speedway Logo

Heuer Carrera Reference 3147

There is a lot to love about the Heuer Carrera Dato 45, starting with its interesting twist on the date window positioning. Of course, it gets even better when the dial sports the golden “Wings & Wheels” logo of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway on the dial. This is actually the second time we’ve featured such a watch in less than two months, but truthfully these are hard to come by, as they were only retailed at the Speedway.

The seller emphasizes the provenance of this reference 3147N, which came from an estate in Indianapolis that included a lot of other Indy 500 memorabilia; its former owner worked at the Speedway during the Indy 500 race. The watch looks in better than honest condition, with the necessary aging that proves that the dial does not come from new stock. The hands are original, and have a very nice patina, which matches the lume plots. Lastly, the manual winding Landeron 189 chronograph movement is said to work well, although the pusher action is described as a bit sluggish.

Heuer Carrera Dato 45

A seasoned Heuer collector is offering this superb Heuer Carrera "Dato 45" for $65,000, but will also consider offers.

Breitling TransOcean Reference 2119 With Original Papers

Breitling Transocean Reference 2119

Breitling first released the TransOcean in 1958 (could an anniversary edition be in the works for next year?) as a sturdy timepiece: "A watch of value to be prized" as the original advertisements said. The first time-only watches were indeed heavily highlighted in Breitling advertising, alongside the Navitimer, the Chronomat, and the Unitime. The merits of the TransOcean were plentiful; it was a chronometer-certified automatic time-only watch (with or without a date window) and its case was described as anti-magnetic and "superwatertight" (a lovely word). 

The 1970s brought a more colorful interpretation of the TransOcean as the present chronograph reference 2119 shows. The crown on the left side gives a clue as to which automatic chronograph caliber that the case houses, which is confirmed by "Chrono-Matic" on the dial. Breitling was indeed involved in Project 99 with its rival Heuer, and was therefore among the first brands to benefit from the revolutionary caliber 11. The automatic TransOcean reference 2119 later evolved as the reference 2129, but it is worth noting that a manual-wound version of this watch also existed as the reference 7102, with a three-counter configuration. This watch comes with its original guarantee papers and manual, both coming in the yellow color that the marketing maverick Georges Caspari had chosen in the 1950s to differentiate Breitling advertising (interestingly, he also played a key role in Breitling’s survival as he introduced Willy Breitling to Sicura owner and future buyer, Ernest Schneider, in 1979).

Breitling Transocean 2119 papers

You can find this Breitling TransOcean reference 2119 listed for 3,500 Euros (or around $4,088).

Mido Robot Display Clock

Mido Robot

The Mido Robot might be one of the cutest horological mascots ever created. Mido chose this symbol in 1939, and featured it extensively in its advertising over the following decades, to underline the technical prowess of its watches. Yet, it was not only about attractive drawings; the smiling robot actually came alive in numerous clocks that were present at points of sale. 

Few of these have survived, so it is always a big thing to see an intact one up for sale, especially with a working electric clock. The robot (also nicknamed "Robi" to make the whole thing even cuter) you see here advertised the Powerwind models back in the 1950s, an important automatic line for Mido. The seller mentions a 23 inch height; it is described as in good working condition, without an cracks or broken part. The electric motor is also shown, and so is the cable with a tiny US plug at its end.

Mido Robot clock

This Mido Robot "Robi" is currently listed on Ebay for $2,250, slightly higher than the previous examples sold but this piece is a true rarity, especially in good working condition.

Source: http://ift.tt/1IiKaDm

Bring a Loupe: A Rare Heuer Carrera ‘Dato 45’ Ref. 3147N, An Early Breguet Type XX In Yellow Gold, A Crazy Mido Robot, And More

Carrera cover 4.jpg?ixlib=rails 1.1

This week’s Bring A Loupe has its fair share of chronographs, and more. We’re featuring a very special Heuer Carrera "Dato 45," bearing the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Logo on its dial. There is also a non-vintage Breguet Type XX: the reference 3800BA in gold, which comes full set here. We round out our selection with a 1970s Breitling TransOcean, and a fantastic Mido Robot. This is your Bring A Loupe for July 28, 2017.

Breguet Type XX In Yellow Gold

The Breguet Type XX is often overlooked when considering notable modern chronographs, despite its strong historical roots and flyback complication. The Type 20 (note here the different numbering) was first released in 1954, in response to a specification issued by the French Army. It was produced until the late 1980s; the latter 2nd generation had a compressor case, larger than the original 38mm one. And the story did not stop there, as Breguet relaunched this icon in 1994 under the Type XX moniker (sort of a new name, but not really).

The reference 3800BA here belongs to the very first batch released, and it shows. The most obvious clue comes from the dial that presents the SWISS signature (it would later be T-Swiss-T); the old Breguet logo without a horizontal stroke on the signature; and 5 minute increments in the sub-register (later those numerals simply disappear). The bezel, crown, second hand are also slightly different in this rare yellow gold piece, of which only 150 were made. And as a bonus, it comes full set with original box and papers.

A German dealer is offering this rare first series Breguet Type XX for 11,000 Euros (or around $12,840).

Heuer Carrera ‘Dato 45’ Reference 3147, With Indianapolis Motor Speedway Logo

Heuer Carrera Reference 3147

There is a lot to love about the Heuer Carrera Dato 45, starting with its interesting twist on the date window positioning. Of course, it gets even better when the dial sports the golden “Wings & Wheels” logo of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway on the dial. This is actually the second time we’ve featured such a watch in less than two months, but truthfully these are hard to come by, as they were only retailed at the Speedway.

The seller emphasizes the provenance of this reference 3147N, which came from an estate in Indianapolis that included a lot of other Indy 500 memorabilia; its former owner worked at the Speedway during the Indy 500 race. The watch looks in better than honest condition, with the necessary aging that proves that the dial does not come from new stock. The hands are original, and have a very nice patina, which matches the lume plots. Lastly, the manual winding Landeron 189 chronograph movement is said to work well, although the pusher action is described as a bit sluggish.

Heuer Carrera Dato 45

A seasoned Heuer collector is offering this superb Heuer Carrera "Dato 45" for $65,000, but will also consider offers.

Breitling TransOcean Reference 2119 With Original Papers

Breitling Transocean Reference 2119

Breitling first released the TransOcean in 1958 (could an anniversary edition be in the works for next year?) as a sturdy timepiece: "A watch of value to be prized" as the original advertisements said. The first time-only watches were indeed heavily highlighted in Breitling advertising, alongside the Navitimer, the Chronomat, and the Unitime. The merits of the TransOcean were plentiful; it was a chronometer-certified automatic time-only watch (with or without a date window) and its case was described as anti-magnetic and "superwatertight" (a lovely word). 

The 1970s brought a more colorful interpretation of the TransOcean as the present chronograph reference 2119 shows. The crown on the left side gives a clue as to which automatic chronograph caliber that the case houses, which is confirmed by "Chrono-Matic" on the dial. Breitling was indeed involved in Project 99 with its rival Heuer, and was therefore among the first brands to benefit from the revolutionary caliber 11. The automatic TransOcean reference 2119 later evolved as the reference 2129, but it is worth noting that a manual-wound version of this watch also existed as the reference 7102, with a three-counter configuration. This watch comes with its original guarantee papers and manual, both coming in the yellow color that the marketing maverick Georges Caspari had chosen in the 1950s to differentiate Breitling advertising (interestingly, he also played a key role in Breitling’s survival as he introduced Willy Breitling to Sicura owner and future buyer, Ernest Schneider, in 1979).

Breitling Transocean 2119 papers

You can find this Breitling TransOcean reference 2119 listed for 3,500 Euros (or around $4,088).

Mido Robot Display Clock

Mido Robot

The Mido Robot might be one of the cutest horological mascots ever created. Mido chose this symbol in 1939, and featured it extensively in its advertising over the following decades, to underline the technical prowess of its watches. Yet, it was not only about attractive drawings; the smiling robot actually came alive in numerous clocks that were present at points of sale. 

Few of these have survived, so it is always a big thing to see an intact one up for sale, especially with a working electric clock. The robot (also nicknamed "Robi" to make the whole thing even cuter) you see here advertised the Powerwind models back in the 1950s, an important automatic line for Mido. The seller mentions a 23 inch height; it is described as in good working condition, without an cracks or broken part. The electric motor is also shown, and so is the cable with a tiny US plug at its end.

Mido Robot clock

This Mido Robot "Robi" is currently listed on Ebay for $2,250, slightly higher than the previous examples sold but this piece is a true rarity, especially in good working condition.

Source: http://ift.tt/1IiKaDm

Bouncy Safety Net Installation Encourages Museum Fun in Singapore

How do you interact with children inside a museum to increase their cultural appetite? Atelier YokYok installed a giant safety net under the main dome of the National Museum of Singapore that allows visitors to witness the art works from a different perspective.

Named Soft Dome, the temporary art installation is 36 ft (11m) wide and 22 ft (7m) high and was put together off-site before being delivered to the museum. The polypropylene net was especially created for the Children’s Season, which lasts until the end of July 2017, and underlines the main theme of the events — Connections.

“Soft Dome is a kind of bouncy hemispheric net that you can experience in the museum’s main rotunda,” the designers explained. “Visitors to the museum are confronted with this majestic black net structure that invades the space.” The concept of an inverted dome is inspired by the interior of the building.

The interaction with the suspended safety net is meant to trigger amusement for both children and adults. “Awe soon gives way to curiosity as you work out how to climb inside the Soft Dome,” Atelier YokYok said.

“Once you venture inside, the visual connection with the museum architecture becomes obvious, as does the link with the building, and you can dive, swing, climb inside the inverted dome, enjoying this playful and exciting interpretation of the museum space.” Photography: Atelier YokYok

The post Bouncy Safety Net Installation Encourages Museum Fun in Singapore appeared first on Freshome.com.

Source: http://freshome.com

Pentax Super Takumar 50mm F/1.4 M42 Mount Lens Review

Eight elements. Eight. The original Zeiss Planars got by with just six, the Planar T* of the 1970s used seven. Minolta, Canon and Nikon all used seven elements in their fifties. Pentax themselves reverted to seven after just two years of producing an eight-element 50mm lens. Even seems to work. Why then, did Pentax ever bother to produce a more complex fifty?

The simple answer is short; Pentax wanted to one-up Zeiss. In the early days of SLRs, Zeiss’s offerings using the universal M42 screw mount were among the best and among the most well-known. Lens coatings came in to use on Zeiss’ six-element Planars in the mid 1950s, which solved a long-standing glare issue which had plagued the optically sophisticated Planars since the 1890s, and has been used on virtually all lenses made since then. Zeiss seemed to be king of the hill, and toppling them would take a truly masterful lens attached to a powerful camera.

Pentax debuted the prototype Spotmatic at Photokina in 1960, with the camera finally hitting the market in 1964, and the standard lens fitted to most Spotmatics was Pentax’s new, Zeiss-killing eight-element 50mm F/1.4. This was the bleeding edge of photographic engineering, and the press was unanimous in declaring a new king fifty had arrived.

Today, this lens seems quite humble by today’s standards. Though its construction is complex it has shortcomings – on its original contemporary machines, it can only be used in conjunction with an in-body light meter when stopped-down. Under bright conditions the lens sometimes suffers from flare issues and odd color fringing. It’s heavy, especially when we fit it to a mirrorless camera via the usual metal adapters.

Despite all this, it’s also wonderful. I own quite a few fifties from its era, and some more modern ones, yet the original Takumar is the one I reach for most often.

It’s worth noting that there are no fewer than four different M42 Pentax Super Takumar 50mm f/1.4s, and they’re all a little different, and they’re not all equal. The review copy is the earliest version, produced from 1964-1966. Thanks to its eight-element contruction this is optically the most complex variant, the tradeoff being that it uses less advanced coatings than its successors.

This eight-element variant is visually identifiable by having the IR focus mark to the right of numeral 4 on the DoF scale, as well as having the deepest rear element of the four lenses. The lens build incorporates eight elements in six groups, including a cemented triplet with curved surfaces. The Pentax rumor mill believes that Pentax lost money on every one sold. While we cannot verify that, it does align with the fact that this variant survived just two years before being replaced with a more conventional seven-element lens, though the fact that Pentax would soon be using Thorium-coated glass may have contributed to the redesign.

In 1966, Pentax switched to a 7-element construction, which they would continue to use even after the M42 mount was replaced by the K-Mount. The first seven-element fifty looks very similar to its predecessor, and features similar coatings. The rear element is slightly shallower than the earlier lenses.










The two final M42 fifties were branded as “Super-Multi-Coated Takumar” or simply as “SMC Takumar.” These lenses featured much-improved coatings and the use of Thorium in some of the lens elements. These advances cut the lenses tendency to flare just about in half, but time has shown that the Thorium can cause yellowing in the cement used to secure the lens elements. This problem can be corrected with UV exposure, and even prolonged exposure to sunlight will mitigate this issue. The level of radiation is very, very low and should not discourage using the lens.

All four variants share the common M42 mount. Only the final version allows for open aperture metering, and only on certain, compatible M42 bodies. These were functionally very basic lenses, a fact which was very apparent by the end of M42 50mm production in 1975.

For those who are unfamiliar with M42 film bodies, particularly those with meters, the Super Takumar has some workflow quirks. Since only one variant allows for open-aperture metering, three of the lens variants are best used in a certain order. On my Spotmatic, and most other M42 bodies, this effectively means you must focus, trip the meter, set your exposure, and then shoot. This is not a big deal when photographing stationary subjects, but can be frustrating when shooting pets, kids, or other fast paced action. When adapted to a mirrorless camera, it’s a non-issue. Like most legacy lenses you are always working stopped-down.

All four variants of the Super-Takumar 50mm have full-metal construction, though some variants have rubberized grips on the lens barrel. My eight-element lens weighs 245g, the first seven element variant weighs 230g, and the remaining two variants are both about 250g. They’re all quite heavy, heavier than the Minolta MD 50mm F/1.4 in fact, despite being substantially smaller.

But with this weight comes great density and a feeling of quality. The aperture ring has a positive mechanical action. The grips on the focus and aperture rings are all machined aluminum. In a quiet room you can hear the air escaping the metal lens cap as you draw it away from the lens. As a mechanical object, the lens is pretty stellar.

That said, the eight element lens is not perfect. Images can be very soft at short and medium ranges when the lens is shot wide open. The issue lessens the closer we get to infinity focus, though I don’t find myself shooting distant subjects wide open that frequently. I’ve noticed that this tendency is substantially worse on digital cameras than it is on film, which may be down to the primitive coatings and the relative “thickness” of a digital sensor’s capture area relative to a 35mm film frame.

Bokeh is very smooth, though because of how soft the lens is wide-open in certain applications, it can be a challenge to photograph subjects at close range.

Pretty simply, the early M42 Super-Takumar does not outperform all other legacy 50mm lenses in a lot of situations. Particularly when adapted to digital. It’s a little soft. It’s also a little heavy, and the threaded mount takes a little more care to use than more modern bayonet or breech-style mounts. On a purely technical level either variant of Canon FD-mount f/1.4 will outperform the eight-element Pentax, and I suspect the later 7-element Super Takumars will do the same.

That said, the eight-element lens keeps working its way into my bag. As I write this, I am puzzling over why that it is. I have at least three generations of its counterparts from Canon, as well as Olympus and a number of third party fifties on my shelf, yet I continually reach for the Pentax, despite its flaws.

Let’s talk about why that is.

The Pentax does a better job with color than its counterparts, particularly when photographing people. I have a wonderful array of photos of my girlfriend looking displeased with me for taking her photo where her skin looks terrific. Whether on my Fuji or on a film body, the Super-Takumar has a very warm character. Images also stay bright corner to corner, with no tendency to vignette. Even under artificial light, the Pentax really works wonders not just compared to its contemporaries, but compared to even my venerable Fuji XF glass.









Because of the small 42mm throat of the lens, the Pentax fits neatly to APS-C digital cameras, and these small lenses adapt much better to my X-series Fuji than most of the other legacy lenses. The tight construction and perfect ergonomics feel more natural than the chunkier Canon and somewhat flimsy Olympus offerings. And interestingly enough, unlike Canon FD lenses the M42 mount Super Takumars are also EOS-friendly.

And et’s not forget the value proposition. These 50mm Super-Takumars are cheap. It’s not hard to find some variant of this lovely Pentax glass for less than the cost of an even more common FD-mount 50mm f/1.8. My eight element lens was free. At press time, a quick eBay search shows that the cheapest 50mm f/1.4 currently up for auction is an early 7-element Super-Takumar- $0.99 starting bid, and no reserve.

At those prices, can you afford not to have one?

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wear this there: les trois cochons.

emerald green wall tile inside les trois cochons. / sfgirlbybay

french food, and nordic design — has there ever been a better combo? les trois cochons makes us question everything that came before it. perfect minty tiles, rich looking leather seating, you’re almost satiated by just a peek. this copenhagen based restaurant serves up delicious classic francophile dishes, and great wines. sounds like an international date night is in order. throw on a luxe jumpsuit, and all the eye-catching accessories you can get your hands on — it’s going to be a long night. this week’s read this there is the best-selling sweetbitter, that follows a young woman who moves to new york – adventure ensues.

~ michaela d’artois, vérité published.

inspiring dining room at les trois cochons. / sfgirlbybaywear this there: les trois cochons. / sfgirlbybay

wear this there: zara printed kimono jumpsuit; pixie market beige square toe clear and leather sandals; want les essentials de la vie demiranda shoulder bag; peach & lily herb tea pure calming mask; club monaco tassel bracelet; read this there sweetbitter by stephanie danler; bing bang nyc your future looks bright cuff; club monaco serafina fringe earring; nars cosmetics orgasm liquid blush.

bread on wall rack at  les trois cochons. / sfgirlbybay what to wear to les trois cochons in copenhagen. / sfgirlbybay oysters at les trois cochons in copenhagen. / sfgirlbybay the menu and inside copenhagen's  les trois cochons. / sfgirlbybay emerald green tile in les trois cochons dining room.  sfgirlbybay leather booth at les trois cochons in copenhagen. / sfgirlbybayexterior of  les trois cochons in copenhagen. / sfgirlbybay the bar at les trois cochons in copenhagen. / sfgirlbybay inspiring interior of  les trois cochons in copenhagen. / sfgirlbybay checkered floors inside les trois cochons. / sfgirlbybay

• photography via we heart and les trois cochons .

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Nonda ZUS Smart Tire Safety Monitor Sends Tire Pressure Data Directly to Your Smartphone

After Zus Smart Car Finder, Nonda has released its latest project, ZUS Smart Tire Safety Monitor. It’s a sleek set of devices that features 4 sensor and a receiver track car tire pressures. Don’t underestimate under-inflated tires, which usually are hard to tell with naked eyes, they can pose you to a real danger. Also, keeping your tires properly inflated means more fuel efficiency.

This device from Nonda would send tire pressure data directly to your smartphone, thanks to those four sensors, you would know exactly when you need to add more air. The company claims that this is the first of its kind device that detects slow leaks, saving you as much as 11 cents per gallon.

From : Nonda [Buy It Here]

Nonda ZUS Smart Tire Safety Monitor

Nonda ZUS Smart Tire Safety Monitor

Installing this device should be easy, it only requires 10 minutes or less to install the sensors onto the tires. Each sensor is designed with special locking system thanks to anti-theft locking kit. This will prevent your sensors from being easily unscrewed. These sensors would detect tire temperature and pressure, sending the data to the ZUS app. You will be alerted immediately when things look abnormal.

The smart thing about this device is that, it stores your car’s temperature and pressure history, using AccurateTemp Algorithm to normalize temperature fluctuations throughout the day, you will be presented with accurate tire pressure changes. This smart algorithm would tell you whether your tires are leaking slowly or not. It’s an affordable, feature-rich device to help you ride your car safely.

Nonda ZUS Smart Tire Safety Monitor

Nonda ZUS Smart Tire Safety Monitor

Nonda ZUS Smart Tire Safety Monitor

Nonda ZUS Smart Tire Safety Monitor



Source: http://www.tuvie.com