Le Fruit

Designed by Rice Creative, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

Le Fruit identity

For the past 15 years, the Le Fruit brand has carefully produced farm fresh juices and jams from locally sourced fruits, operating from the rich, fertile Mekong Delta region of Vietnam. We were invited by Le Fruit to rebrand the corporation as well as their full range of products. Our objective was to showcase the brand’s core difference; their dedication to preservative-free locally made natural products. This would support Le Fruit in competing with an array of foreign products currently dominating the market.

The rebrand helped Le Fruit tell their story, and jump off the shelves through vibrant color and iconography derived from the tropical fruits and plants of the Mekong Delta. The full range of products billboard into a bold, eye-catching spectrum.

Le Fruit sketches

Le Fruit sketches

Le Fruit symbols

Le Fruit identity

Accompanying carefully crafted custom tropical icons, our studio developed a juicy hand-drawn script for each product name. While the majority of the packaging gives the brand well qualified look of expertise, the script helps the brand communicate it’s hands-on approach.

Le Fruit typography

Le Fruit typography

Le Fruit typography

Le Fruit typography

Le Fruit typography

The Interborough typeface by Giang Nguyen is also in use.

Le Fruit identity

Le Fruit identity

Le Fruit identity

Le Fruit identity

Le Fruit identity

Le Fruit identity

Le Fruit identity

Le Fruit identity

Le Fruit identity

Le Fruit identity

Le Fruit identity

Le Fruit identity

Le Fruit logo

The results have proven successful as the brand is not only taken more seriously, but it is one that marketers love to give prominent space to. Le Fruit has gone on to enter previously inaccessible retail environments, such as high-end supermarket chains, international airports, and franchises such as Starbucks. The brand is also finding shelves in foreign markets such as Japan, Korea, and the United Arab Emirates.

Le Fruit identity

Le Fruit identity

Le Fruit identity

Le Fruit identity

All featured Rice Creative projects.

More on the Rice Creative website.

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Putting America’s Libraries In New Light


Thomas R. Schiff’s interest in American libraries grew from his fascination with American architecture, which he’s photographed for several decades. Schiff published a book on the architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright, and his 2012 book, Prospect, looks at remarkable buildings around the country.

Schiff’s new monograph, The Library Book (Aperture), gathers panoramic images he’s created at public and private libraries around the country over the course of more than a decade. The book depicts libraries in 30 of the 50 states.

There are old libraries, such as the Boston Athenaeum, which was established in 1807, and contemporary libraries, such as architect Rem Koolhaas’s Seattle Central Library, which was completed in 2004. Schiff photographed The Morgan Library in New York City, The Library of Congress in Washington, D.C., and the Los Angeles Public Library. He also visited several university libraries. Schiff and Aperture’s Chris Boot, who edited the book, decided to show interiors primarily but include some exteriors as well. The result is a fascinating tour of many of America’s monuments to study, history, education and leisure.

© Thomas R. Schiff

Thomas R. Schiff’s photo, “Boston Athenaeum,” 2010, appears in The Library Book, a collection of his panoramic photos of American libraries.

Schiff chose his libraries for their architectural significance, their history and their current state of use and preservation. “I was looking for libraries where they paid a great deal of attention to the architecture and how it looked, and where you could tell that the people in the town wanted to build something that stood out, and that was unique and architecturally significant,” he explains.

His search for interesting architectural detail “compelled” him to photograph libraries, and, he says, he’s “just always felt comfortable” among the stacks. “I remember as a child going to the library with my mom and just spending hours and hours there looking at a wide variety of books.” Schiff takes a purposefully objective, typological approach to his work, aided by the democratic panoramic camera, which offers a 360-degree view.

His goal for the work, he says, is that he’s “made some pictures that will allow people to look at buildings, and look at interior spaces specifically, in a different way than what they’re used to. [The panoramic format] allows them to see the whole building and the whole space all at once. It’s a new way, a different way of looking at things, and my hope is that people will be amazed by that.”

Working with the panoramic camera is something of a signature for Schiff. He’s done so for 20 years, and he still shoots 120 or 220 roll film. A lot of photographers who work with panoramic cameras tend to photograph landscapes, he notes, whereas he’s doing something “a little bit different” by focusing on architecture and interiors.

© Thomas R. Schiff

“State Library of Iowa Law Library, Des Moines” 2011. © Thomas R. Schiff

When Schiff arrives at a location, he looks for a position at or near the center of a room. Because he uses a wide-angle lens, eye-level photographs would be unbalanced, incorporating more floor than ceiling, he explains. Schiff uses a tripod to raise his camera 10 to 20 feet, so he can place it midway between the ceiling and the floor. He can’t look through a raised camera to frame his pictures, so he moves the camera around a bit, creating 15 to 20 frames at each library. The panoramic camera format distorts the straight lines. “I’ll try to have the camera placed in the location where I’ll have some of the building lines close to the top of the frame and then some on the bottom,” Schiff explains. He is simply searching for “the most pleasing composition,” he says.

Despite his seemingly humble aims, Schiff’s skill in using the panoramic camera to interpret architectural detail is evident from the features he emphasizes with his camera placement. A concrete column at the center of his image of the Marcel Breuer-designed Alcuin Library at Minnesota’s Saint John’s University seems to prop up the entire structure. His photograph at the Beaux-Arts Handley Library in Winchester, Virginia, turns a spiraling staircase into a series of graphic, sweeping lines.

Beyond esthetics, Schiff’s matter-of-fact approach leaves a great deal to his viewer. While marveling at the architecture, the shelves, the library ladders, the murals, artwork and stained glass, we might also search for meaning in the physical manifestations of the intellectual ambitions of different individuals and institutions.

Related Articles:

Ty Cole’s Photos Offer a New Look at London’s Brutalist Buildings

Picturing Architecture at the Venice Biennale 

Thomas Schiff Gallery: Looking Around America’s Libraries

Source: http://ift.tt/15PZfuh

Putting America’s Libraries In New Light


Thomas R. Schiff’s interest in American libraries grew from his fascination with American architecture, which he’s photographed for several decades. Schiff published a book on the architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright, and his 2012 book, Prospect, looks at remarkable buildings around the country.

Schiff’s new monograph, The Library Book (Aperture), gathers panoramic images he’s created at public and private libraries around the country over the course of more than a decade. The book depicts libraries in 30 of the 50 states.

There are old libraries, such as the Boston Athenaeum, which was established in 1807, and contemporary libraries, such as architect Rem Koolhaas’s Seattle Central Library, which was completed in 2004. Schiff photographed The Morgan Library in New York City, The Library of Congress in Washington, D.C., and the Los Angeles Public Library. He also visited several university libraries. Schiff and Aperture’s Chris Boot, who edited the book, decided to show interiors primarily but include some exteriors as well. The result is a fascinating tour of many of America’s monuments to study, history, education and leisure.

© Thomas R. Schiff

Thomas R. Schiff’s photo, “Boston Athenaeum,” 2010, appears in The Library Book, a collection of his panoramic photos of American libraries.

Schiff chose his libraries for their architectural significance, their history and their current state of use and preservation. “I was looking for libraries where they paid a great deal of attention to the architecture and how it looked, and where you could tell that the people in the town wanted to build something that stood out, and that was unique and architecturally significant,” he explains.

His search for interesting architectural detail “compelled” him to photograph libraries, and, he says, he’s “just always felt comfortable” among the stacks. “I remember as a child going to the library with my mom and just spending hours and hours there looking at a wide variety of books.” Schiff takes a purposefully objective, typological approach to his work, aided by the democratic panoramic camera, which offers a 360-degree view.

His goal for the work, he says, is that he’s “made some pictures that will allow people to look at buildings, and look at interior spaces specifically, in a different way than what they’re used to. [The panoramic format] allows them to see the whole building and the whole space all at once. It’s a new way, a different way of looking at things, and my hope is that people will be amazed by that.”

Working with the panoramic camera is something of a signature for Schiff. He’s done so for 20 years, and he still shoots 120 or 220 roll film. A lot of photographers who work with panoramic cameras tend to photograph landscapes, he notes, whereas he’s doing something “a little bit different” by focusing on architecture and interiors.

© Thomas R. Schiff

“State Library of Iowa Law Library, Des Moines” 2011. © Thomas R. Schiff

When Schiff arrives at a location, he looks for a position at or near the center of a room. Because he uses a wide-angle lens, eye-level photographs would be unbalanced, incorporating more floor than ceiling, he explains. Schiff uses a tripod to raise his camera 10 to 20 feet, so he can place it midway between the ceiling and the floor. He can’t look through a raised camera to frame his pictures, so he moves the camera around a bit, creating 15 to 20 frames at each library. The panoramic camera format distorts the straight lines. “I’ll try to have the camera placed in the location where I’ll have some of the building lines close to the top of the frame and then some on the bottom,” Schiff explains. He is simply searching for “the most pleasing composition,” he says.

Despite his seemingly humble aims, Schiff’s skill in using the panoramic camera to interpret architectural detail is evident from the features he emphasizes with his camera placement. A concrete column at the center of his image of the Marcel Breuer-designed Alcuin Library at Minnesota’s Saint John’s University seems to prop up the entire structure. His photograph at the Beaux-Arts Handley Library in Winchester, Virginia, turns a spiraling staircase into a series of graphic, sweeping lines.

Beyond esthetics, Schiff’s matter-of-fact approach leaves a great deal to his viewer. While marveling at the architecture, the shelves, the library ladders, the murals, artwork and stained glass, we might also search for meaning in the physical manifestations of the intellectual ambitions of different individuals and institutions.

Related Articles:

Ty Cole’s Photos Offer a New Look at London’s Brutalist Buildings

Picturing Architecture at the Venice Biennale 

Thomas Schiff Gallery: Looking Around America’s Libraries

Source: http://ift.tt/15PZfuh

Speakeasy Chic: Philly’s Latest Hip Hotel Embraces Its Industrial Past

Wm. Mulherin’s Sons is an American tale: an Irishman who immigrated to America at age 15 and made it big, William Mulherin housed his award-winning whiskey bottling operation in a corner factory building in Philadelphia’s Fishtown. Later his sons took over the successful enterprise, only to have it all shut down by prohibition.

Years later the landmark building, which still bares his name, is playing host to a new breed of American makers and entrepreneurs. True to its history, Wm. Mulherin’s Sons, an Italian-inspired restaurant helmed by chef Chris Painter (and more recently a four-suite hotel) offers a characterful blend of the old and the new. Owner and designer Method Hospitality was careful to preserve much of the landmark building’s industrial character while at the same time embracing the Fishtown’s new creative vibe. Spacious yet homey, each of the hotel’s rooms features original touches, including handmade woodwork and metalwork, bespoke furniture, and custom original wallpaper made and designed by local artisans.

Photography by Matthew Williams.

mulherin hotel philadelphia room 1 kitchen
Above: The hotel’s whiskey palette includes wood and leather bar stools by Stellar Works as well as a Workstead Brass Chandelier ($2,150) for a speakeasy feel.
mulherin hotel philadelphia room 1
Above: Relaxed furnishings, original art, and live plants, make each lofty room feel like a home away from home.
Mulherin hotel philadelphia whiskey jug
mulherin hotel philadelphia blue sofa
Above L to R: Water is provided in one-gallon jugs with original illustrations by local artist Stacey Rozich. In room one Anthropologie’s Leather Linde Sofa in indigo is flanked by custom metal table by J. Cottingham; $3,798.
wm mulherins sons hotel room 4 dining
Above: Nearly all of the artwork in the rooms was provided by Lumas Gallery.
mulherin hotel philadelphia kitchen detail
mulherin hotel philadelphia room 2 kitchen
Above: Bespoke kitchens are made with custom wooden cabinets by Tim Lewis Studio and brass hardware by J. Cottingham.
mulherin hotel philadelphia room 3 bar
Above: Exposed ducts, pipes, and electrical enhance the industrial vibe.
wm mulherins sons philadelphia bed
Above: In room three, Tillandsia from Field Plant Supply peek out of nooks above a custom bed by Tim Lewis Studio as well as Modo Desk Lamp from Roll & Hill; $520.
mulherin hotel philadelphia room number 2
Above: A nod to Fishtown’s burgeoning music scene, each room is equipped with a custom, handmade sonophonic consoles by Conowingo Americas.
mulherin hotel philadelphia tub
Above: Room four’s bathroom features an original clawfoot tub.
wm mulherins sons wallpaper stacy rozich
wm-mulherins-sons-table
Above, L to R: More personal touches include Stacy Rozich’s whimsical wallpaper as well as live plants from Field Plant & Supply.
mulherin-hotel-philadelphia-room 1b
Above: Vintage Persian carpets from Old New House warm the concrete floors.
mulherin hotel philadelphia room 3 skylight
Above: Details from the building’s former life include a pulley system used for winching heavy loads.
wm mulherins sons bar corner
Above: Helmed by chef Chris Painter, Wm. Mulherin’s Sons Italian-inspired restaurant was named one of Bon Appetit’s 50 Best New Restaurants.
wm mulherins sons dining room fireplace
Above: Like the hotel, the restaurant, which includes a fireside lounge, marries old-world and industrial textures—wood, concrete, leather, and steel—to conjure a modern pub feel.

Heading to the City of Brotherly Love? Here are more design-forward accommodations:

The post Speakeasy Chic: Philly’s Latest Hip Hotel Embraces Its Industrial Past appeared first on Remodelista.

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springtime in paris.

colorful paris apartment. / sfgirlbybay

usually when i see this much color i might shy away — it can often be too much for me (lover of all things sedate in decor). but this paris apartment just works and doesn’t feel over the top to me — instead it’s very cheerful and full of that french joie de vivre. featured recently on inside out magazine, i admire the owner’s adventurous endeavor with the color blue — and not just one shade but many, and paired with those classic high ceilings and ornate crown moldings the combination makes for a dramatic yet playful juxtaposition.

colorful paris apartment via inside out magazine. / sfgirlbybaycolorful kitchen in paris via inside out magazine. / sfgirlbybaycolorful wallpaper in paris apartment via inside out magazine. / sfgirlbybaycolorful desk area via inside out magazine. / sfgirlbybayblack and white hallway with red floral wallpaper. / sfgirlbybaybold colors in paris bedroom. / sfgirlbybay

• photography via inside out magazine.

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Eversafe – Gas Rescue Concept Helmet with An Instant Escape Hood

Eversafe is special gas rescue helmet designed to protect workers in an emergency situation such as a gas alarm. In the event of a gas alarm in chemical plant, workers have to hold their breath and wear an escape hood before they can leave the site, it can make them vulnerable during the process. Eversafe Rescue Helmet is an innovative design that combines an escape hood with an ergonomic safety helmet, it is easy and intuitive to use, it offers instant protection when needed.

Simply pull those two blue handles, the mask would be released from its protective covers and positioned over mouth and nose in just two seconds, then sealed around the neck. At the same time, the mask activates the filter element. Thanks to transparent mouth piece and cheek windows, user won’t have problem in good communication and vision.

Designers : Jost Siebert and Darja Wendel

 Eversafe - Gas Rescue Helmet by Jost Siebert and Darja Wendel

 Eversafe - Gas Rescue Helmet by Jost Siebert and Darja Wendel

 Eversafe - Gas Rescue Helmet by Jost Siebert and Darja Wendel

 Eversafe - Gas Rescue Helmet by Jost Siebert and Darja Wendel

 Eversafe - Gas Rescue Helmet by Jost Siebert and Darja Wendel
Click above image for bigger view

Eversafe – Gas Rescue Concept Helmet with An Instant Escape Hood is originally posted on Tuvie – Modern Industrial Design

Source: http://www.tuvie.com

Gracelaced {Pictures of Grace}

Guess what….I photoshopped my ‘Ashley can’t look at a camera’ headshot on a graphic my friend Ruth posted…GL_Motherhood_Series

Really, I can’t look at the camera because I am distracted by Joy Prouty’s floral crown. My face totally says, “I want a fun crown like Joy!”

Okay, I didn’t Photoshop myself on there, but every time I look at it that is what I think. In my head I also start singing, “One of these things is not like the other, one of these things just doesn’t make sense.” Oh hey super cool ladies, want to come hang out at my house someday with me?

In all seriousness, my dear friend Ruth Simons of Gracelaced is doing a series on motherhood this week. She interviewed 5 moms on the topic of motherhood. I’m not sure how I made the list, but I’m sure grateful she asked. As part of the series, I submitted a Bible verse that is meaningful to me in regards to motherhood, along with my favorite flowers and colors…and Ruth did her thing…

ACampbellGracelaced-02It came out so perfect! If you line up all the prints in her Mother’s Day collection I feel like anyone could have guessed which one is mine. We are a homeschooling family, which means my kids are around me a lot! Not only do they hear nearly every word I speak, they pick up on all my unspoken thoughts and feelings (the meditations of my heart). I want my words to bring life to my kids. Often what comes out of my mouth is the overflow of my mind and my heart. When I consider what I want my kids to hear and see in me – I want it to be those things that are pleasing to God. If the words of my mouth and the meditations of my heart are pleasing to God, well, they will also be the types of things I want my kids to hear and pick up from me. The second part of the verse reminds me that God is my Rock and my Redeemer. I do not stand on the shifting sand of culture, the tide of opinions of others, or lies I might be tempted to believe about myself. My aim is not be to please others, but the One who is my Rock and Redeemer.

Today Ruth is sharing my full interview on her blog- there is a bit about what surprised me about motherhood, what routines help me thrive and my advice to new moms.

ACampbellGracelaced-03

The sale will run until Sunday, April 30th. Use the code MOTHERSDAY20 to get 20% off all items in the GraceLaced Shoppe. All orders that include an item from the Mother’s Day Collection will receive a free “Strength and Dignity” 5×7 print, limit one per order.

GL_Sale_Freebie

Source: http://ift.tt/qd8WY6

Gracelaced {Pictures of Grace}

Guess what….I photoshopped my ‘Ashley can’t look at a camera’ headshot on a graphic my friend Ruth posted…GL_Motherhood_Series

Really, I can’t look at the camera because I am distracted by Joy Prouty’s floral crown. My face totally says, “I want a fun crown like Joy!”

Okay, I didn’t Photoshop myself on there, but every time I look at it that is what I think. In my head I also start singing, “One of these things is not like the other, one of these things just doesn’t make sense.” Oh hey super cool ladies, want to come hang out at my house someday with me?

In all seriousness, my dear friend Ruth Simons of Gracelaced is doing a series on motherhood this week. She interviewed 5 moms on the topic of motherhood. I’m not sure how I made the list, but I’m sure grateful she asked. As part of the series, I submitted a Bible verse that is meaningful to me in regards to motherhood, along with my favorite flowers and colors…and Ruth did her thing…

ACampbellGracelaced-02It came out so perfect! If you line up all the prints in her Mother’s Day collection I feel like anyone could have guessed which one is mine. We are a homeschooling family, which means my kids are around me a lot! Not only do they hear nearly every word I speak, they pick up on all my unspoken thoughts and feelings (the meditations of my heart). I want my words to bring life to my kids. Often what comes out of my mouth is the overflow of my mind and my heart. When I consider what I want my kids to hear and see in me – I want it to be those things that are pleasing to God. If the words of my mouth and the meditations of my heart are pleasing to God, well, they will also be the types of things I want my kids to hear and pick up from me. The second part of the verse reminds me that God is my Rock and my Redeemer. I do not stand on the shifting sand of culture, the tide of opinions of others, or lies I might be tempted to believe about myself. My aim is not be to please others, but the One who is my Rock and Redeemer.

Today Ruth is sharing my full interview on her blog- there is a bit about what surprised me about motherhood, what routines help me thrive and my advice to new moms.

ACampbellGracelaced-03

The sale will run until Sunday, April 30th. Use the code MOTHERSDAY20 to get 20% off all items in the GraceLaced Shoppe. All orders that include an item from the Mother’s Day Collection will receive a free “Strength and Dignity” 5×7 print, limit one per order.

GL_Sale_Freebie

Source: http://ift.tt/qd8WY6

Claudio Ethos creates four murals in Caera and Beirut

Claudio Ethos is a renowned Brazilian street artist from Sao Paulo, widely known for his impressive large scale murals, highly distinctive for their great detail and captivating surrealist imagery. While we haven’t heard much from Claudio in a while, he has recently unveiled that he has painted 4 murals for two different festivals, on the other sides of the globe – large wall (as seen above) in Caera, Brazil, and three smaller murals in Beirut, Lebanon (as seen below).

Massive baby blue mural in Brazil is the most recent piece from all by Ethos. It is in the Contempoary art Museum of Ceara state and it took the artist six days to complete. It is related to the usual dreaming atmosphere of the artist – it is a guy golding a kite string and looking to the sky. This kind of kite is called “pipa” and it is very popular all over Brazil, from the youngest to the elderly. It is about a allusion of Brazilian popular culture.

The next three pieces were done last year for festival Urban Down in Beirut, Lebanon. Every each of them took one day to make. The neighbourhood where the artworks are located is called Ouzai. Artist inspiration for these three murals came from based on the usual contact with the neighbourhood, he chooses every colour for the artwork based on the setting and surroundings, so every piece looks good in the spot it is in.

First artwork down below is a guy falling from the sky with four hands, it could be understood as ability to built new ways to survive by having a set of extra hands.

Second artwork is of two people in a boat, and it is more related to the fantastic world, and more passionate atmosphere.

Third artwork is a head with floating hammer next to it, which makes an allusion for the judges of the law and their power. This subject is very important in Brazil right now, as the Brazilians had a coup of state in their fragile democracy last year, and lost their stability of economic and work rights, so they are at risk.

 

 

 

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