All fired up: Clay Stories is a triumphant display of contemporary Indigenous ceramics

Sabbia Gallery – Alison Milyika Carroll working on a pot at Ernabella Arts ceramic studio, 2017. Photo Ernabella Arts, Courtesy of Sabbia Gallery

The exuberant exhibition Clay Stories: Contemporary Indigenous Ceramics from Remote Australia is part of the 2017 Tarnanthi Festival of Contemporary Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art. While pottery making and firing were never part of the pre-contact repertoire, the pulse of tradition infuses these ceramic artworks.

Held at the JamFactory’s Seppeltsfield Gallery, Clay Stories is a collaboration between the Remote Communities Ceramic Network and Sydney’s Sabbia Gallery. The spacious, light-filled gallery on Seppeltsfield’s winery estate is the picture perfect setting for displaying these strikingly variegated bodies of work.

The ceramic artworks in Clay Stories have been sourced from remote Indigenous Art Centres located on the homelands of Indigenous people, from island to inland. These centres, controlled by members of local Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander communities, represent optimal practice in the field, with profits routinely re-invested back into the organisation, providing grassroots infrastructural support for younger or emerging artists.

Sabbia Gallery – Clay Stories – Lynette Lewis – Tjala – Honey Ants – 2017 stoneware with sgraffito – 450 h x 162mm d. Private Collection. Photo Sabbia Gallery.

Clay Stories includes works by ceramists from Hermannsburg in Central Australia, Ernabella Arts on the APY Lands, the Tiwi Islands, the Torres Strait Islands and the Girringun Aboriginal Art Centre in far northeastern Queensland. They have been grouped on the basis of their regional provenance, thus capturing the distinctiveness of each body of work.

A sensible curatorial decision, this allows visitors to understand the specific zeitgeists and socio-cultural contexts that have given rise to the works, in terms of location and terrain, whether land and/or sea, and each group’s unique pre- and post-contact historical circumstances.

The works of Tiwi potter Jock Puautjimi, equally esteemed for his sculptural Pukumani (funerary) poles, are those of an artist at the top of his game. Puautjimi’s Tiwi Bird is a re-creation of an episode in Tiwi oral tradition chronicling events that brought death to the Tiwi Islands.

Sabbia Gallery – Clay Stories No 80 – Jock Puautjimi – Tiwi Bird – 2017 – hand built carved and glazed stoneware 580 h x 200 w x 150 mm d. Photo Sabbia Gallery.

Two Ancestral Beings, the adulterous lovers Bima and Japara, contravened Tiwi Law. Their sexual transgression led to the death of Bima’s baby Jinani, the demise of these two star-crossed lovers and their eventual transformation into Other Beings. Tiwi Islanders became forever mortal thereafter.

Birds figure prominently in this foundational Tiwi narrative. Tiwi Bird is an elegant, deceptively simple work, masking the true art that conceals art. Puautjimi’s marvellous visual poetry is also evident in his Open Vase. Adorned with classical Tiwi geometric designs, the clean lines, bold design and skilled craftsmanship informing this work confirm Puautjimi’s status as an Old Master.

Erub Islander Jimmy Kenny Thaiday evokes age-old Torres Strait Islander tradition in his dramatic ceramic rendering titled Le Op. In this magisterial sculptural piece, Thaiday re-creates a type of ceremonial mask originally carved from turtle shell and worn by Torres Strait Islander men. Thaiday’s younger countrywoman, Ella Rose Savage, also demonstrates in her ceramic works how the richness of Islander tradition and cultural practice continues to serve as an abundant source of creativity, regardless of medium used.

Artistic renaissance at Girringun

Cardwell, a small township some 1,500 kilometres north of Brisbane on Queensland’s north-eastern coast, is the home of the Girringun Aboriginal Art Centre, a collective representing nine distinct language groups. Girringun has very quickly become a hothouse of constant, bubbling artistic activity. Ceramic works are at its forefront.

Sabbia Gallery – Clay Stories – Girringun Aboriginal Art Centre – Emily Murray 60 h x 17 w x 8 cm d. Photo Sabbia Gallery.

The local people, mostly descendants of rainforest tribes, traditionally carved Bagu figures, ochre-painted Fire-Spirit Beings, from slow-burning wood, typically the milky pine (Alstonia scholaris). These curious little wooden homunculi have deep cavities in place of the eyes from which licking flames and smoke would leap. Traditionally, jiman (firesticks) were attached to the Bagu (fireboards). In the old days, these enchanting, mercurial beings were regarded as having sorcery power, but their practical use was paramount. Fire was a precious commodity to be transported everywhere, lest flames be extinguished in that damp, dank rainforest environment.

An exciting artistic and cultural renaissance is currently taking place at Girringun Art Centre. People are making ceramic Bagu figures ranging in size from diminutive to monumental. Major artists include Sally Murray, Emily Murray and Eileen Tep, all of whom have Bagu ceramic works on display in Clay Stories. Something else very powerful seems to inhabit these charismatic Bagu re-creations, partially related to the force field that these figures seem to exert. In equal measure this is a result of the artists’ sheer brilliance.

Moving inland to Ernabella Arts, another ceramics workshop and business is thriving. Based in Pukatja in northern South Australia, and located on the homelands of the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara people, the Ernabella potters have been collaborating with the JamFactory for some years now.

Sabbia Gallery – Clay Stories – Rupert Jack at work at the Ernabella Arts Ceramic Studio 2017. Photo Ernabella Arts.

Rupert Jack’s stoneware with sgraffito work Ili evoking the native, desert or rock fig (Ficus platypoda) is among the standout exhibits on show, along with terrific work by Lynette Lewis, Alison Milyika Carroll and Derek Jungarrayi Thompson.

The Hermannsburg Potters

Hermannsburg, now known as Ntaria, is where the first modest foray of Aboriginal people into making and firing ceramics began on mainland Australia in the early 1960s. Two local Western Aranda men, Joseph Rontji and Nahasson Ungwanaka, worked with the mission gardener Vic Jaensch to construct a rudimentary kiln. They fired small, rather kitsch figurines.

Nahasson Ungwanaka (left) and Joseph Rontji at the Hermannsburg Mission, Northern Territory, working with clay to make ceramic figurines, photograph courtesy of Denise Mossel [née Kuhne], 1962.

After Jaensch departed the Mission there was a long hiatus in making ceramics until 1990 when the professional ceramist Naomi Sharp arrived. Sharp stayed for 16 years during which time the ceramists acquired professional skills.

Today’s Hermannsburg Potters are nationally and internationally acclaimed.
Rahel Kngwarriya Ungwanaka, Nahasson’s widow, has work in Clay Stories, as does Rona Panangka Rubuntja and the current and long term Chairperson of Hermannsburg Potters, Judith Pungkarta Inkamala. All three women began working with Sharp from the very beginning of what has now become a major enterprise.

Sabbia Gallery – Clay Stories No 67 – Rona Panangka Rubuntja – Nuka Pmere – My Country – 2017 – hand built terracotta and underglaze – 330 h x 270mm d. Photo Sabbia Gallery.

Rona Panangka Rubuntja’s Nuka Pmere (“My Country”), in which she portrays a mare and her foal, reveals this artist’s impish sense of fun. Peeking around the pot’s circumference, one can’t fail to notice that the foal’s mother is in fact taking a massive dump, graphically and humorously represented, in an understated way. This sent children (and many adults) off with big smiles on their faces as they moved through the gallery space.

The women’s ceramic works are mostly comprised of rounded bellies, a direct influence of Pueblo Native American pottery. Their lidded tops depict Dreamings, and/or local fauna and flora, historical scenarios, or scenes drawn from everyday life or other subject matter meaningful to each individual artist.

“Bush creatures” lovingly created by Judith Inkamala perch atop her rounded bowls. Inkamala’s ceramic magpie, for instance, seems poised to take flight, either to swoop down to gorge an attractively bald pate or take off skyward.

A brave new world

The works in Clay Stories also materialise to a greater or lesser extent the brave new world imposed upon their makers by British colonisation. But collectively, they serve to retain each group’s long-term social and cultural memories, standing against cultural and political amnesia.

Sabbia Gallery – Clay Stories No 37 Jimmy Kenny Thaiday – Little People – 2015 – hand built carved wood fired ceramic – tallest 360mm h. Private Collection. Photo Sabbia Gallery.

Not only are these ceramic works grounded in everyday living, but they’re also connected to country, and to narrative. Whilst many other contemporary Australian artists at times struggle to find inspiration for their artwork, these artists never angst about their choice of subject matter.

Clay Stories is a triumph. (It also exists at a fortuitous crossroads where art meets business.) These ceramic artists’ specific histories, Dreamings, and their country constantly replenish and refresh their artistic vision. Drawing on rich repositories of narrative these visual traditions continue to flow through the current generations. For this enduring source of cultural and visual fluency the artists have their Ancestors to thank. It isn’t just a matter of “mining the archive” but a means of representing their living cultures.

Clay Stories continues at the JamFactory’s Seppeltsfield Winery location until 10th December, after which it embarks on a national tour, which will continue well into, and beyond, 2019.

The Conversation

Christine Judith Nicholls does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organisation that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment.

Source: http://ift.tt/10p9N0X

Our Favorite Black Friday Deals!

IMG_5569

I hope everyone had an amazing Thanksgiving!! I’m up at my parents’ house with my family, enjoying the cooler weather and stuffing our faces. We all just woke up from our Thanksgiving naps and now we’re all talking about Black Friday sales! There are a lot of great sales this weekend and in an effort to help you save time, we rounded up  some of our favorite and most asked about items from that we used throughout the year – that also happen to be a part of some awesome Black Friday sales!

Gentry One Room Challenge-52

Indigo Lamp Base – $34!

We used this dark indigo lamp in our One Room Challenge master bedroom and it is so, so beautiful! It is the absolute perfect shade of blue!!

Gentry One Room Challenge-32

Brass Wall Sconce – Only $44!

These weren’t the original sconces we intended to use in this space, but this last minute change ended up being one of our absolute favorite elements of the room!! These sconces are so beautiful and look SO much more rich than the $44 price tag!

Seven Magic Mountains Living Room-8

Moroccan Rug – 6×9 only $141!!

This is one of our absolute favorite rugs! You really can’t beat this price for a rug of this size and quality! It’s a great, low commitment way to transform your living room.

IMG_7398 copy

Live Edge Coffee Table – $179

We still get SO many questions about this rug. Again, you cant beat this price for a rug of this size! This color and pattern are also perfect for familes with kids and pets – it hides everything!!!

GM-30

Overdyed Blue Rug – 6×9 only $115!!

And these black and white lumbars are still a favorite! They’re on major clearance this weekend for only $17!

5I5A2726 copy

Black & White Pillows – $17

______________________________________

Screen Shot 2017-11-21 at 11.59.53 AM

source

One of our favorite pillow makers, Danielle Oakey, is offering 15% off from the 24th-27th! Here are a few of our favorite styles!

do

1  //  2  //  3  //  4  //  5

Everything in The Vintage Rug Shop is 30% off! If you are in the market for some gorgeous vintage rugs, now is the time to grab one! Use code YAYBLACKFRIDAY!

Screen Shot 2017-11-23 at 11.51.21 AM

source

Screen Shot 2017-11-23 at 11.51.47 AM

source

______________________________________

We got so many questions about the two new prints we used in the One Room Challenge bedroom! MERCER and COTTONWOOD will be available in the Print Shop at midnight on Sunday night. We are doing a HUGE Cyber Monday sale that will launch at the same time, so be sure to sign up for the newsletter and to follow us on Instagram for the announcement this weekend!

Gentry One Room Challenge-18

MERCER print

Gentry One Room Challenge-35

COTTONWOOD print

Happy shopping, friends! xo

The post Our Favorite Black Friday Deals! appeared first on Little Green Notebook.

Source: http://ift.tt/25Rr0WW

Adobye?

“Corporations are evil”, is what we hear around us often enough. I have often thought that this was at best an exaggeration, but now I am not so sure: Adobe is doing a good job of appearing to be as evil as possible.

I am talking about Adobe Lightroom, the application that I, my students, and most professional photographers use to run their business. Lightroom rocks. Or rather, it used to rock.

There are now three versions:

  1. The almost-impossible-to-find standalone version. This version is now at 6.13 and, even though it is already missing features, will not be updated anymore. So if you run this, do upgrade, but expect nothing new, now or ever.
  2. Lightroom CC. This is a dumbed-down version for web- and portable-based use. It is missing many essential features: it is basically a toy for people who are unable to learn file management and similar sophisticated features. CC means Creative Cloud: meaning you get to pay Adobe US$10 (which will go up, no doubt) each and every month for the rest of your life (yeah, do the math). Worse, it will need regular permission from Adobe to run. Who on earth would allow their business to be held hostage by some US mega-corporation in this way? Your payment does not reach them, or the login server malfunctions, or Adobe goes broke (you can always hope), or your Internet connection is down when it is most needed – and wham, you are not given permission by Adobe to see your own work.
  3. Lightroom Classic CC. This is basically the existing Lightroom, but with upgrades, and alas, also with the same huge “CC” drawbacks.

Both versions 2 and 3 do everything they can to drive you to the web and to mobile devices. From my perspective, this is dumb, dumb, dumb. Mobile devices are limited, and the last thing a pro needs is “limited”. Why would I handcuff myself? I’ll edit on my Mac, thanks.

And web-based: right. I have 8 TB of photos. which would take about 8 months to upload, with my Internet connection pinned at full capacity for all of those eight months. Not gonna happen. Also, with the top version of the app you get 1 TB of capacity, not 8.

My strategy is simple.

  1. Continue to use 6.13 for as long as I can.
  2. Wait desperately for a competitor (and many companies are working on it)
  3. Change from a Pro-Lightroom evangelist into an Anti-Adobe evangelist.

The Adobe support person who just conformed all this to me said “if I were you I would feel the same way”. Who knows, if enough of us refuse to move to CC, Adobe may yet reverse their decision. But I am not holding my breath.

 

Source: http://ift.tt/2uQgpuY

Adobye?

“Corporations are evil”, is what we hear around us often enough. I have often thought that this was at best an exaggeration, but now I am not so sure: Adobe is doing a good job of appearing to be as evil as possible.

I am talking about Adobe Lightroom, the application that I, my students, and most professional photographers use to run their business. Lightroom rocks. Or rather, it used to rock.

There are now three versions:

  1. The almost-impossible-to-find standalone version. This version is now at 6.13 and, even though it is already missing features, will not be updated anymore. So if you run this, do upgrade, but expect nothing new, now or ever.
  2. Lightroom CC. This is a dumbed-down version for web- and portable-based use. It is missing many essential features: it is basically a toy for people who are unable to learn file management and similar sophisticated features. CC means Creative Cloud: meaning you get to pay Adobe US$10 (which will go up, no doubt) each and every month for the rest of your life (yeah, do the math). Worse, it will need regular permission from Adobe to run. Who on earth would allow their business to be held hostage by some US mega-corporation in this way? Your payment does not reach them, or the login server malfunctions, or Adobe goes broke (you can always hope), or your Internet connection is down when it is most needed – and wham, you are not given permission by Adobe to see your own work.
  3. Lightroom Classic CC. This is basically the existing Lightroom, but with upgrades, and alas, also with the same huge “CC” drawbacks.

Both versions 2 and 3 do everything they can to drive you to the web and to mobile devices. From my perspective, this is dumb, dumb, dumb. Mobile devices are limited, and the last thing a pro needs is “limited”. Why would I handcuff myself? I’ll edit on my Mac, thanks.

And web-based: right. I have 8 TB of photos. which would take about 8 months to upload, with my Internet connection pinned at full capacity for all of those eight months. Not gonna happen. Also, with the top version of the app you get 1 TB of capacity, not 8.

My strategy is simple.

  1. Continue to use 6.13 for as long as I can.
  2. Wait desperately for a competitor (and many companies are working on it)
  3. Change from a Pro-Lightroom evangelist into an Anti-Adobe evangelist.

The Adobe support person who just conformed all this to me said “if I were you I would feel the same way”. Who knows, if enough of us refuse to move to CC, Adobe may yet reverse their decision. But I am not holding my breath.

 

Source: http://ift.tt/2uQgpuY

Cakewalk Ceases New Product Development

Cakewalk just issued a statement that the company will cease new product development and reduce overall operations. Cakewalk is assuring that their software products and servers will continue to operate, monthly updates for SONAR however will cease. You can read the full story here. Source: http://ift.tt/ZsssYX

Cakewalk Ceases New Product Development

Cakewalk just issued a statement that the company will cease new product development and reduce overall operations. Cakewalk is assuring that their software products and servers will continue to operate, monthly updates for SONAR however will cease. You can read the full story here. Source: http://ift.tt/ZsssYX

Friday essay: why grown-ups still need fairy tales

Edmund Dulac’s 1910 illustration of Sleeping Beauty Wikimedia images

For as long as we have been able to stand upright and speak, we have told stories. They explained the mysteries of the world: birth, death, the seasons, day and night. They were the origins of human creativity, expressed in words but also in pictures, as evidenced by the cave paintings of Chauvet (France) and Maros (Indonesia). On the walls of these caves, the paintings, which date back to around 30-40,000 BC, tell us myths or sacred narratives of the spirits of the land, the fauna of the regions, and humankind’s relationship to them.

A hyena painting found in the Chauvet cave.
Wikimedia images

As humanity progressed, other types of stories developed. These were not concerned with the mysteries of the meaning of life but with everyday, domestic matters. While they were more mundane in the issues they explored, such tales were no less spectacular in their creativity and inclusion of the supernatural.

These smaller, everyday stories, combining the world of humans with fantastical creatures and seemingly impossible plots are now classified as fairy tales or folk tales. Such tales, originating in pre-literate societies and told by the folk (or the average person), capture the hopes and dreams of humanity. They convey messages of overcoming adversity, rising from rags to riches, and the benefits of courage.

Hansel and Gretel by Arthur Rackham.
Wikimedia images

Fairy tales are also extremely moral in their demarcation between good and evil, right and wrong. Their justice references the ancient tradition of an eye for an eye, and their punishments are ruthless and complete. Originally for adults (sometimes for children), fairy tales can be brutal, violent, sexual and laden with taboo. When the earliest recorded versions were made by collectors such as the Brothers Grimm, the adult content was maintained. But as time progressed and Christian morality intervened, the tales became diluted, child-friendly and more benign.

Despite these changes, it is apparent that fairy tales are still needed today, even for grown-ups. In an uncanny, sometimes inexplicable way, we consciously and unconsciously continue to tell them, despite advances in logic, science and technology. It’s as if there is something ingrained in us – something we cannot suppress – that compels us to interpret the world around us through the lens of such tales. And if we are not the tellers, we are the greedy consumers.

‘Fairy tale’ princesses and ‘wicked witches’

The 20th anniversary of the death of Diana, Princess of Wales, for example, has been cast – like her life – as a fairy tale. Throughout the year, she has been commemorated in articles with headings such as “a troubled fairy tale”, “beyond a fairy tale”, and “just another fairy tale”. While these articles have endeavoured to deconstruct the familiar narrative, they have not been entirely successful.

Fairy tale wedding? Prince Frederik and Princess Mary.
Jerry Lampen/Reuters

The notion of a fairy tale princess has also characterised the coverage of Princess Mary of Denmark and Duchess Catherine of Cambridge. Even after 13 years of marriage, our own “Aussie princess” is described as living a fairy tale, evident in 2017 media stories with titles such as “Princess Mary and Prince Frederik’s fairy tale royal romance”. Likewise, Kate, once a commoner, now a princess, has featured in articles titled “Prince William and Duchess Kate’s fairy-tale love story” and “Kate’s Most Royal Fairy Tale Gown (To Date)”. As the titles of some of these stories show, they also feature the mandatory prince charming (William), or the prince who is revealed to be not-so-charming after all (Charles). Others extend the fairy tale formula to include wicked stepmothers (Di’s real life stepmother) and wicked witches (Camilla).

Is such recourse to fairy tales merely a media stunt to sell stories packaged in an easily consumable, gossip-laden snack box? Or, do these stories reflect that deep-seated compulsion of ours to tell and, in turn, to listen to stories? The answers are “yes” and “yes”. But let’s forget the media’s role and look at the more interesting latter point.

Many fairy tales began thousands of years ago, the age depending on the tale itself. Beauty and the Beast has its origins in the story of Cupid and Psyche from the Greek novel, The Golden Ass, from the second century AD.

Jacques-Louis David’s 1817 painting of Cupid and Psyche, the inspiration for Beauty and the Beast.
Wikimedia images

In this tale, the beautiful Psyche is visited at night by an invisible lover – hearing only a voice – whom she is led to believe is a monster. While recorded by the novelist, Apuleius, the story is almost certainly much older; perhaps having its origins in myth and ritual, and handed down by word of mouth.

The research of Dr Jamie Tehrani has unearthed an early date for Red Riding Hood, which he has traced back to at least 2,000 years; not originating in Asia, as once believed, but most likely in Europe. Other tales studied by Tehrani have been dated to as early as 6,000 years ago.

Fairy tales are excellent narratives with which to think through a range of human experiences: joy, disbelief, disappointment, fear, envy, disaster, greed, devastation, lust, and grief (just to name a few). They provide forms of expression to shed light not only on our own lives but on the lives beyond our own. And, contrary to the impression that fairy tales always end happily ever after, this is not the case – therein lies much of their power.

They helped our ancestors make sense of the unpredictability or randomness of life. They repeated familiar experiences of unfairness, misfortune, bad luck, and ill-treatment and sometimes showed us how courage, determination and ingenuity could be employed even by the most disempowered to change the course of events.

Arthur Rackham’s Jack and the Beanstalk Giant.
Wikimedia images

Jack and the Beanstalk, for example, tells how a chance encounter with a stranger (an old man who provides magic beans) can bring about terrible danger (meeting a giant) but also terrific good fortune (acquiring a hen that lays golden eggs). The tale also celebrates how a poor boy can make the most of an arbitrarily dangerous situation that could have gone either way – being eaten or becoming rich – through his bravery and his intellect.

Fairytales also celebrated unexpected good fortune and acts of kindness and heroism, thereby reinforcing – even restoring – our faith in humanity. As tales of the folk, they not only entertained, but reflected the turmoils and triumphs of the lower classes, and enabled them to fantasise about how the “other half” lived.

Cinderalla and social criticism

But tales of kings, queens, princes and princesses – of which there are many – are not only a means of mental escape for the poor. They are also a means of social criticism.

19th century engraving of Gustave Doré’s Cendrillon – Cinderella. From Dore’s 1864 edition of Stories or Fairy Tales from Past Times with Morals, originally published in 1697.
Wikimedia images

In Cinderella, as recorded by Charles Perrault, the two stepsisters may have every material possession imaginable, but their cruelty renders them grotesque. And, of course, the lowly Cinderella triumphs. In the German version, Aschenputtel, recorded by the Brothers Grimm, the fate of the stepsisters is very different. Whereas Perrault’s version has the kindly Cinderella forgive them, the Grimms – clearly working from another tradition – describe how they have their eyes plucked out by pigeons!

Such stories of fantasising about a royal life and simultaneously despising it may have functioned as an emotional release similar to the ancient Greek experience of catharsis (the shedding of anxieties through watching outrageous tragedies and obscene comedies).

Taking the fascination with Diana’s life as a fairy tale, for example, we still employ the cathartic release of the genre to interrogate her and, for those of us so inclined, to find some meaning in the Di phenomenon. From the romantic courtship, to the wedding of the century and that dress, to motherhood, glamour, betrayal, heartbreak, divorce, alienation and a new love cut short by an early death.

Diana on her wedding day in 1981.
Mal Langsdon/Reuters

Some, of course, have criticised the warm, fuzzy emotionalism that has sprung from the fairy tale of Di’s life. If it is not to your liking, there are more robust tales with powerful messages of resistance and resilience. In tales such as Hansel and Gretel and Donkeyskin, the young protagonists are persecuted and abused by predators.

There is much to complain about in these tales from a politically correct or feminist perspective. They are violent and subversive: Gretel pushes a witch into an oven and in Perrault’s version of Donkeyskin, a king wishes to marry his daughter following the death of his wife. But they are more than narratives of abuse. They are also about courage and ingenuity on the part of the young survivors.

Miwa Yanagi, Gretel 2004, gelatin silver print.
Collection of the Hara Museum of Contemporary Art

Courtesy of the artist and Yoshiko Isshiki Office, Tokyo

Donkeyskin, variants of which are extant in English (Catskin) and German (All-Kinds-Of-Fur), champions the bravery and inherent goodness of the young heroine who dresses in the skin of a donkey and leaves the palace in order to escape her father’s desires. Her subsequent life as a servant, filthy, humiliated, reviled and renamed “Donkeyskin” by her fellow servants, never crushes her soul.

Within the fantasy and the convenient appearance of supernatural assistants or a romantic ending, both of which feature in Donkeyskin, these stories are powerful reminders that evil exists in the world in the form of human beings – but it is not definitive or unconquerable.

Contemporary reworkings

With the publication of the Grimms’ Children’s and Household Tales in 1812, artists and illustrators were the first interpreters of fairy tales. Visual responses have ranged from famous works by Gustave Doré, Arthur Rackham and Edmund Dulac to Maurice Sendak and Jan Pieńkowski.

More dissident responses have included the photographs of Dina Goldstein, whose Fallen Princesses series (2007-2009) is an astute response to the Disney princess phenomenon of unattainable, debilitating images of femininity and romance in bowdlerised versions of the original tales. Here, Goldstein critiques the superficiality of the princess stereotype, reminding us that it is as facile for children as the Diana fairy tale dream is for adults.

Before Goldstein, photographer Sarah Moon also challenged the dilution of fairy tales in the modern west through her provocative (sometimes banned) interpretation of Little Red Riding Hood. In this powerful rendition, Moon takes her child reader back to the original and raw meanings embedded in the tale through her exploration of the theme of the human predator in the symbolic guise of the wolf.

Moon’s decision to return to the terror and drama of the Grimms’ version is testimony to the need to challenge the dilution and contamination of the tales. Even the Grimms were guilty of adding and subtracting to the material, particularly when it came to the insertion of overt Christian morality. Equally if not more so, the Disneyfication of fairy tales has stripped them of the power and the pain to which Moon returns.


Writers and poets have also responded to the tales and, like Moon, have regularly sought to return them to their once formidable status. Women authors in particular have created powerful, sometimes heartbreaking – but always real and truthful – new versions.

Among the thousands of old tales in new clothes is the literature of second wave feminists, including the suite entitled Transformations (1971) by renegade poet Anne Sexton, who takes the domesticity of the original tales and mocks, ridicules, cherishes and – literally – transforms them. Angela Carter’s The Bloody Chamber (1979), a magnificent collection of retellings of famous fairy tales, is full of female empowerment, sensuality and violence in a tour de force that both reinstates the potency of the stories and re-imagines them.

Novelist, poet and essayist, Margaret Atwood also transforms the originals. Her response to The Girl Without Hands, which tells the story of a young woman who agrees to sacrifice her hands in order to save her father from the devil, in a poem of the same name is a profound meditation on the continuation of both abuse and survival.

The fairy tales first preserved by collectors such as the Brothers Grimm – retold, bastardised, edited, annotated, banned and reclaimed – belong ultimately to the folk who first told them. And the folk continue to tell and retell them. Closer to home than the Black Forest, a new show at the The Ian Potter Museum of Art contains work by international and Australian artists, including Tracy Moffatt and Sally Smart. The show returns – once again – to fairy tales to express social concerns and anxieties surrounding issues such as the abuse of power, injustice and exploitation.

Dina Goldstein, Snowy 2008 from the Fallen Princess series.
digital photograph

Courtesy of the artist

Fairy tales are, indeed, good to think with, and their retellings shed light on cultural, societal and artistic movements. Both children and adults should read more fairy tales – both the original and the transformed versions, for they are one of our cultural touchstones.

All the better to see you with: Fairy tales transformed, is on from Thursday 23 Nov 2017 to Sunday 4 Mar 2018 at The Ian Potter Museum of Art, The University of Melbourne.

The Conversation

Marguerite Johnson does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organization that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment.

Source: http://ift.tt/10p9N0X

22 Fresh Free Fonts Download

New free fonts 100% free download and used in commercial work. Fresh handwritten brush fonts, script fonts and typefaces perfect for logotypes, badge, packaging, headline, poster, t-shirt/apparel, greeting card, and wedding invitation. The following fonts are ideal to make an attractive design and fit for any artwork. Take a look at beautiful, bold condensed, vintage, sans serif commercial fonts for professional design, based upon suggestions from designers and web developers all over the world.

All fonts are free and available for commercial use. If you need more cool fonts, you must check our font’s collection, because we published thousands of free fonts for graphic and web design projects.

You may be interested in the following related articles as well.

Fresh Free Fonts Download for Commercial Work

GDJ always keep our readers up-to-date with fresh graphic design resources, especially about the fonts. In this post, I’ll be featuring twenty five free commercial Fonts For Designers. So what are your waiting, go and check out all of them and download the ones you like most.

Mr. Quincy Free Font

Mr. Quincy Free Font
Mr. Quincy Free Font Letters

Font Download

Elephant Display Free Font

Elephant Display Free Font
Elephant Display Free Font Letters

Font Download

Storytella Free Font

Storytella Free Font
Storytella Free Font Letters

Font Download

Garment District Free Font

Garment District Free Font
Garment District Free Font Letters

Font Download

Fenway Script Free Font

Fenway Script Free Font
Fenway Script Free Font Letters

Font Download

Kung Free Font

Kung Free Font
Kung Free Font Letters

Font Download

Endoell Free Brush Font

Endoell Free Font
Endoell Free Font Letters

Font Download

Neoneon Free Font

Neoneon Free Font
Neoneon Free Font Letters

Font Download

The Booster Free Font

The Booster Free Font
The Booster Free Font Letters

Font Download

Ciderhouse Free Font

Ciderhouse Free Font
Ciderhouse Free Font Letters

Font Download

Crash One Free Font

Crash One Free Font
Crash One Free Font Letters

Font Download

Woodbone Free Font

Woodbone Free Font
Woodbone Free Font Letters

Font Download

Silverwood Free Font

Silverwood Free Font
Silverwood Free Font Letters

Font Download

Botera Free Font

Botera Free Font
Botera Free Font Letters

Font Download

Fili & Kyla – Monoline Handwriting Script Free Font

Fili & Kyla Free Font
Fili & Kyla Free Font Letters

Font Download

56th Street Free Font

56th Street Free Font
56th Street Free Font Letters

Font Download

Quenos Free Font

Quenos Free Font
Quenos Free Font Letters

Font Download

Airfool Free Font

Airfool Free Font
Airfool Free Font Letters

Font Download

NMF Burner Free Font

NMF Burner Free Font
NMF Burner Free Font Letters

Font Download

Bahagia Free Font

Bahagia Free Font
Bahagia Free Font Letters

Font Download

Messages Free Font

Messages Free Font
Messages Free Font Letters

Font Download

Grand Finale Free Font

Grand Finale Free Font
Grand Finale Free Font Letters

Font Download

Source: http://ift.tt/1aq7nUh

SOG Baton Q2 Urban Multi-Tool Is Basic Essential for Urban Adventurer

Functional and reliable, SOG Baton Q2 Urban Multi-Tool offers you basic essentials during your urban adventure or wilderness. This new design is based on the classic multi-tool, this time, it features new sleek 6.3-inch design and 4 useful tools: straight edge blade, bottle opener, LED flashlight, and medium Flathead screwdriver. [Buy It Here]

SOG Baton Q2 Urban Multi-Tool

SOG Baton Q2 Urban Multi-Tool

SOG Baton Q2 Urban Multi-Tool fits your adventure lifestyle, even though it’s designed as everyday carry, each tool offers different purpose that you might need in an unexpected event or place. Slim and compact, this multi-tool has the same dimensions as your ink marker, therefore, it fits easily in your pocket or backpack. This tool is specially designed to accommodate different kinds of users, such as office and administrative work, basic wilderness, urban emergency, daily essential, and many more. [Buy It Here]

SOG Baton Q2 Urban Multi-Tool

SOG Baton Q2 Urban Multi-Tool

SOG Baton Q2 Urban Multi-Tool





Source: http://www.tuvie.com

40 Beautiful Accent Chairs That Add Splendour to Your Seating

No interior is complete without a gorgeous accent chair. Whether lounging in the library, sitting afront your powdering table or making you feel boss in the office, there’s a beautiful chair for every interior setting. Set a powder blue swan astride your bedroom table, creating a space to relax before dressing. Cradle your newborn to sleep, in an orange leather egg. Sit a golden creation behind your desk, with a stone linen seat set atop a fan of metal gold. Surprise and delight yourself each time you sit down, with our top forty picks for snazzy accent chairs.


$90BUY IT

Pink Accent Chair With Wooden Legs: Go back to the fifties in glamorous velvet. This dusky rose, sturdy-legged chair could look a dream in your living room or beside your bedside table.


$122BUY IT

Small Modern Accent Chair: Get artistic with your curves. Solid and masculine, this plywood frame and faux leather seat make a mockery out of expensive walnut and leather upholstery prices.


$162BUY IT

Mid-Century Modern-Style Walnut Accent Chair: Want to get closer to the real deal? The smooth lines of these mid-century chairs are created with basswood and poplar, boasting a walnut-look finish as their final punctuation. Stainless steel legs with non-marking feet ensure a floor that’s just as beautiful.


$397BUY IT

Wood & Faux Leather Accent Chair With Arms: Relax a little more, in this reclaimed wood chair. A soft, upholstered seat in tan faux leather lets red oak hues do the talking.


$253BUY IT

Arne Jacobsen-Style Swan Chair: For a bedroom staple both man and wife can lie in, it doesn’t come much easier than this swan chair. Framed in metal and coloured in powdered blue or red, lift its under-seat adjustment to make it sit at your level. Ottoman available separately.


$350BUY IT

Verner Panton S Chair: Make a statement in your office. This gorgeous, teardrop-shaped beauty is lined in crimson cashmere on hardwood and steel. Its roller wheels let you skirt around your office on the hunt for paper files.


$181BUY IT

Wegner-Style Shell Chair: Want somewhere to lean back and read the paper? This shell-shaped chair in solid oak provides padding in black leather, managing to look stylish and comfortable at the same time. Find its 1963 original for sale here.


$139BUY IT

Panton S Chair: Draw one single line in your choice of seating. Architects and engineers will love this ABS-engineered seat, formed from one continuous piece of plastic and stacking up to four seats high. Choose from black, red, blue or white.


$300BUY IT

Arne Jacobsen-Style Egg Chair: Think velvet is old-fashioned? Think again with this contoured egg chair swivelling on steel. Its deep seat and high-back form are perfect for enjoying your morning latte or pondering life’s intricacies.


$550BUY IT

Leather Barcelona Chair: Buy a psychologist’s couch of your own. Covered from top to toe in fine aniline leather (even over the piping and buttons), this sophisticated, Freud-esque design was first launched in 1929.


$178BUY IT

Bertoia-Style Diamond Wire Accent Chair: Go outside the boundaries. This modern chair with continuous wire design adds flair. Vinyl leather seating offers a comfortable base for your bachelor pad or home office.


$148BUY IT

Modern Lime Green Accent Chair: Fancy a bit of green in your life? This faux-leather chair makes a colourful friend, as its brushed-silver finish legs hold your form on high.


$200BUY IT

Mid-Century Modern Tufted Accent Chair: After a little tufting? This grey find quilts its sides in soft linen, showing off exposed stitching and a built-in pillow for your back.


$200BUY IT

Modern Grey Accent Chair: Want a chair that follows a Scandinavian feel? This grey linen fabric seat atop four natural wooden legs offers style with two cushions to boot.


$927BUY IT

Hans Wegner-Style Papa Bear Chair: Lauded as ‘the most comfortable chair ever made’, the solid ash wood frame and woollen upholstery of this arm-rested chair has all papa bears needing a seat. Buy it in grey or white to add an heirloom to the office.


$140BUY IT

Modern Black Velvet Accent Chair: Want a different kind of armchair luxury? Coat it in black velvet and line it with high-density foam, creating a hardwood seat with a high back’s drama.


$4,125BUY IT

Wittmann Vuelta 80 Red Accent Chair: Receive ‘oohs’ and ‘aahs’ when guests enter the room. This stunning luxury accent chair by Jaime Hayon is set upon a wood and metal frame, with a leather and velvet overlay. Buy it in eight decadent colours.


$180BUY IT

Tufted High Back Accent Chair: Want a more elongated statement? This lighter-red velvet chair removes the armrests, builds in tufting and sits its pretty form on solid wooden feet.


$160BUY IT

Upholstered Barrel Accent Chair: Get a chair that’s as good-looking as it is easy to clean. This teal number’s solid wood frame can support large loads, while its removable polyester cushion makes washing it a breeze.


$220BUY IT

Chesterfield Blue Accent Chair: Find a chair with a classic shape. Upholstered in blue velvet, the tufting and armrests of this timeless design can withstand the ages.


$773BUY IT

Tufted Low-Back Navy Blue Accent Chair: Make it more square. The straight lines of this tufted and nail-head trimmed creation are finished off perfectly in velvet.


$285BUY IT

Traditional French-Style Accent Chair With Stripes: Introduce some French flair into your household. Framed in cedar wood with a cotton seat base, this chair’s subtle stripes and distressing evoke the feeling of the French countryside.


$540BUY IT

Gold Accent Chair: Go super modern with a chair in gold. Geometric shapes design the back of its powder-coated steel, while its seat is easily personalised with your choice of cushion.


$1,200BUY IT

Golden Base Accent Chair: A white fluffy chair is the stuff dreams are made of. Complement your dressing table with this sea of white faux fur, elegantly poised on a gold-painted metal frame.


$860BUY IT

Platner-Style Accent Chair: Add subtle flair to your accent chair. Designed mid-century, its linen base fronts a veritable fan of gold metal panelling. Buy the original design here.


$678BUY IT

Industrial-Style Metal And Leather Brown Accent Chair: Add to your industrial home decor with a unique accent chair. Made of pewter wood and distressed leather upon a sturdy metal frame, it’s the perfect way to relax within constructed lines.


$170BUY IT

Modern Orange Accent Chair: Inject some art deco into your home. This soft microfiber chair offers comfort and a cavity at its back. Pop it in your waiting area beside a bunch of flowers.


$504BUY IT

Curvy Maroon Accent Chair With Ottoman: Introduce some real luxury into your lounge or bedroom. Complete with matching ottoman, this purple velvet find’s lines mold to the shape of a relaxed posterior.


$654BUY IT

Bohemian-Style Upholstered Patchwork Chair: Are you a fan of patchwork? Make your next nook or cranny colourful, with this statement chair upheld by wood-look legs.


$175BUY IT

Floral Barrel Chair: Bring spring (or fall!) home with this beautiful floral fabric chair!


$268BUY IT

Faux Cowhide Black & White Accent Chair: Wondered how this cow-hide chair is such a great price? Shhh, it’s not real. Lined with faux leather to the back and nail-head trimming on its sides, this wingback chair is a little animalistic.


$72BUY IT

Purple Faux Fur Accent Chair: Available in 14 colours, these faux fur chairs mix Scandinavian-style legs with Oscar the Grouch.


$100BUY IT

Eames Rocker Chair: Rock your child to sleep in a stylish cubby. Formed using heavy-duty plastic, its chromed-wire legs and wooden runners bring tradition to a famous design.


$1,860BUY IT

Saarinen Womb Red Accent Chair: Just given birth? Relax in this chair named ‘womb’. Its fibreglass shell and hand-stitched cashmere have brought feelings of security since 1948.


$890BUY IT

Wegner Wing Chair Replica: Looking for something more muted? This replica chair’s molded foam seat, stainless steel frame and woollen upholstery add class.


$875BUY IT

Kardiel Cub Yellow Accent Chair: With the original priced over $3,500, this handmade chair and ottoman are a steal. Built upon an ash wood frame, its Danish-style twill comes in four colours.


$138BUY IT

Small Teal Accent Chair: After a smaller seat? This Scandinavian scoop chair does the trick.


$260BUY IT

Butterfly Leather Chair: Don’t have space for an accent chair all of the time? Showcase this leather chair some of the day, folding its hand-stitched form away by night.


$209BUY IT

Rattan Papasan Chair: Give your home a Moroccan feel. This hand-crafted rattan round complete with acrylic cushion can be seated indoors or outdoors, thanks to its UV and mildew-resistant fabric.


$242BUY IT

Multi-Color Rattan Accent Chair: Another hand-crafted rattan gem, this colourful seat comes complete with a cushion and one-year warranty.

Recommended Reading:
32 Comfortable Reading Chairs To Help You Get Lost In Your Literary World
50 Modern Dining Chairs To Set Your Table With Style
50 Stunning Scandinavian Style Chairs To Help You Pull Off The Look

Related Posts:

Source: http://ift.tt/NlZgQi