Twenty Thousand & Eighteen

If you follow, visit, peruse or otherwise…”pop” in to this blog…then you know we strive to “rock it” in the ambient mixological world. : )

And now, 2017 is finito…and 2018 looms large upon us. We’ll not disappoint you in the new year’s ambient realm…& that’s a promise!

Happy New Year!!!

Happy New Year 2018

 

 

Source: http://ift.tt/2kRlH58

Spoon & Tamago’s Most Popular Products of 2017

2017 marked the 4th-year of running our little shop alongside our blog, which this year turned 10. Both continue to be entirely bootstrapped and operated internally for both quality and experience control perspectives. Doing everything in-house poses several challenges but it enables us to form relationships with our favorite artists, makers and designers and be […]

Source: http://ift.tt/zlrR8Y

Spoon & Tamago’s Most Popular Products of 2017

2017 marked the 4th-year of running our little shop alongside our blog, which this year turned 10. Both continue to be entirely bootstrapped and operated internally for both quality and experience control perspectives. Doing everything in-house poses several challenges but it enables us to form relationships with our favorite artists, makers and designers and be […]

Source: http://ift.tt/zlrR8Y

Life-Size Cardboard Sculptures of Chinese Villagers Tap Into Artist Warren King’s Ancestral Heritage

Warren King began sculpting with cardboard as an attempt to add fantasy to the lives of his children, creatively crafting masks and helmets out of the recyclable material. This slowly evolved into a more time-consuming arts practice as King began focusing less time on costumes, and more time making large sculptures of his own. After a visit to his grandparents’ village in Shaoxing, China, the New York City-based artist felt compelled to more deeply connect with his cultural past. This sparked Grandfather’s Friend, and Arrival Times, a series of life-size cardboard recreations of his ancestors. 

“During my first visit to China about 7 years ago, I visited the village and spoke with residents who actually remembered my grandparents from over 50 years ago,” said King. “It was a pivotal experience for me, one that inspired me to become an artist. Through my work, I am attempting to understand the fragile connections to people and culture, and examine whether those connections, once broken, can be restored.”

King’s cardboard sculptures will be shown in the exhibition Art of Asia at the Peninsula Fine Arts Center from February 2 to March 28, 2018. You can see more of his work on his Instagram and Flickr.

Source: http://ift.tt/odnItH

Life-Size Cardboard Sculptures of Chinese Villagers Tap Into Artist Warren King’s Ancestral Heritage

Warren King began sculpting with cardboard as an attempt to add fantasy to the lives of his children, creatively crafting masks and helmets out of the recyclable material. This slowly evolved into a more time-consuming arts practice as King began focusing less time on costumes, and more time making large sculptures of his own. After a visit to his grandparents’ village in Shaoxing, China, the New York City-based artist felt compelled to more deeply connect with his cultural past. This sparked Grandfather’s Friend, and Arrival Times, a series of life-size cardboard recreations of his ancestors. 

“During my first visit to China about 7 years ago, I visited the village and spoke with residents who actually remembered my grandparents from over 50 years ago,” said King. “It was a pivotal experience for me, one that inspired me to become an artist. Through my work, I am attempting to understand the fragile connections to people and culture, and examine whether those connections, once broken, can be restored.”

King’s cardboard sculptures will be shown in the exhibition Art of Asia at the Peninsula Fine Arts Center from February 2 to March 28, 2018. You can see more of his work on his Instagram and Flickr.

Source: http://ift.tt/odnItH

Happy New Year 2018

Wishing you all a Fantastic, Remarkable, Incredible & Amazing Happy New Year 2018. May this New Year bring new hopes, new promises and new reasons to celebrate your presence in your life. Have a Joyous New Year 2018.

Happy New Year 2018

Hurray! Thank you, thank you thank you… all for your help, advice, support, kicks from behind to keep me spurred on, and for taking the time to read my articles and comment on them and how can we forget our Advertisers, who makes GDJ more powerful and give strength to make a contribution in Graphic Design and Blogging World. Thanks and happy new year.

 

I would like once again to wish you a

Emoji Happy New Year 2018

Source: http://ift.tt/1aq7nUh

Y.A. Tittle (1926-2017)

mobley.jpg

What a crazy and tumultuous year it was! Many arenas of public life were rocked, by storms political and literal, by recriminations and distrust, by escalating wars and ethnic conflicts, tarnished by sexual assault revealations, buffeted by the rising nationalist, racist, and toxic rhetoric. I thought we should end the year with a fitting image of exhaustion, resilience, and hope.

Y.A. Tittle, the quarterback for the New York Giants, who died earlier this year showed all those qualities in his last game as a pro footballer. 1964. It was Sept. 20, 1964, and ‘Big John’ Baker – 6-foot-7, 279-pound Pittsburgh Steelers lineman – had ploughed through him. Tittle, suffering from a concussion and bruised ribs, knelt in the end zone, his helmet gone and bleeding from two cuts on his forehead. He looked double his 37 years, many newspapers commented, and he soon retired.

The moment produced one of the most enduring images in sports, a photo which earned a place in the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Adding to the humanity was the background: a handful of fans sitting on the lawn chairs at field level, and mostly empty end-zone bleachers. It encapsulated the agony of defeat so well that it was for the longest time one of only three pictures in the lobby of the National Press Photographers Association headquarters, alongside with the Iwo Jima and the Hindenburg photos.

The photo was above taken by Dozier Mobley covering the Steelers-Giants game for The Associated Press. Another photographer, Morris Berman, took an almost identical image for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, but his editor refused to publish it ‘because of its lack of action’. Berman instead entered his photo in a contest later, and it won the 1964 National Headliner award for best sports photograph. Two versions of the photo are frequently mistaken for one another, not least by Tittle, who used the Berman photo and credited it to Mobley in his autobiography, Nothing Comes Easy: My Life in Football.

Mobley remembered that day inside the Pitt Stadium: “But I missed the best shot, we all did. After that picture, we put our cameras down. Then, there he was, looking up at the sky with a terrible grimace. And there was no time to get it.”

*

My Patreon Ad: Patreon is an Internet-based platform that allows content creators to build their own subscription content service. You can subscribe to my channel there for as little as $1 and get some extra comments and commentary.

It has been a few months since I started Patreon, and it has given me a few creative ideas,  encouragements, and good interactions with readers. I had tremendous fun researching and writing Iconic Photos, and the Patreon is a way for this blog to be more sustainable and growth-focused. Here is the link to my Patreon:

http://ift.tt/2q5lcpx.

Filed under: Sports Tagged: Dozier Mobley, football, Giants, Morris Berman, Steelers, Y A Tittle Source: http://ift.tt/1sTYDkI

Product Of The Week: 3 Cool Calendars For 2018

Year in Review 2017

The fire is crackling, I am sat snug in my Chesterfield with a glass of warm brandy and a pile of illustration books within arms-reach. In this period of reflection, I look back at 2017 and the Lounge’s journey so far.

The Illustrator’s Lounge started in 2011 as a daily blog, created by three like-minded illustration enthusiasts. Our goal was clear; to bring more attention to illustrators from around the world. Our posts were short and to the point. One paragraph with lots of pictures.  However, we also enjoyed sharing our opinions on each illustrator and what made them stand out to us which resulted in longer features. For almost three years, we did a pretty good job of posting daily but as other commitments took hold, gaps in frequency began to appear.

By early 2014, two of the three contributors had to wind down their involvement entirely and since then I have been the sole contributor. As such, you may have noticed output has dropped, with a significant dip this year. But heading into 2018 my aim is to post at least twice a week. It’s a privilege to connect with the illustration community across the globe and I continue to appreciate all the positive feedback and support we’ve had during our evolution. This year, although output was low, the Lounge launched three, exciting and popular new features – ‘Editions’, ‘Monographs’ and ‘In Their Own Words’.

Editions

The Lounge launched a range of exclusive high-quality art prints, called ‘Editions’.

This was borne from the belief that high quality, original illustration prints should be available to all, at an affordable price.  To produce each Edition, the Lounge collaborates with an influential member of the illustration community.

For each print,  I chose museum-grade paper, 100% cotton rag, OBA (Optical Brightener Additives) free paper and to use archival pigment inks. Nowadays, there is a focus on screen printing art prints. While screen printing has a wonderful tactile history, it inherits limitations. We use giclée printing, to reproduce a lasting image exactly as intended by the illustrator.

The first Edition print, ‘Lanzarote’ is by Game of Thrones illustrator Robert Ball. You can buy it from our shop.

Look out for more exclusive Edition prints from high profile illustrators including Neil Packer and Jan Bielecki, in 2018.

Monographs

At the start of 2016, we began journeying across Britain to meet, interview and film professional illustrators in their studios.

From this, in 2017, we launched a new video series ‘Monographs’ which creates a full picture of today’s illustration industry and community. Going behind the scenes of the creative process, it gives illustrators a chance to talk about their career, techniques and to share their insight on industry trends. I am extremely proud of this series and am grateful to all of the illustrators who have helped to shape it.

In Monographs Episode 1, we met London-based illustrator Robert Ball who discusses how his portrait style garnered attention and how artistic imitation has impacted him.

Look out for even more Monographs lined up for 2018, including Jan Bielecki, Neil Packer and William Grill.

In Their Own Words

In November the Lounge introduced an exciting regular feature ‘In Their Own Words’ where we invited illustrators from across the globe to share their creative journeys. The series was launched by Jameela Wahlgren and contributors so far have included: Steeven Salvat, Kaley McKean, Eunjeong Yoo and Leonardo Santamaria.

For those keeping count, this is our fourth regular feature, joining Manga Mondays, Fashion Fridays and Sequential Sundays and it will continue to grow in 2018.

Thank you

Thank you fellow Loungers for your constant support, your regular visits and shares. Hope to see you in the new year!

— Mr Geo Neo

Source: http://ift.tt/1DBQEwm

“Amers Perdus” by Michel Lauricella and Jean-Dominique Ferrucci in Paris, France

Michel Lauricella and Jean-Dominique Ferrucci are back with another paste-up on their home, Paris streets. Located on Rue des 2 Avenues, this piece is dedicated to migrants and it took the artists two long, rainy and cold nights to put up.

We wanted to make a work about migrants. Because migrants are a symptom of the state of the world, a terrible symptom. A photo of the sea with mountains far away, evanescent faces, words, pieces of papers with words, runs of painting, garbage and wood on the floor… and 2 fires in the night. It’s not easy to read or understand this picture. If you are just walking by, you may not even notice it, it looks as it is a part of the wall… You need to make a stop to see the faces, to read a few words… As an allegory of the transparence of the migrants in our daily lives…

As usual, artists worked together when mixing their work and ideas to bring out this very humble tribute. Michael’s drawings and Jean-Dominique’s photos made this complex and chaotic form, with the work being more committed than decorative…

Check out more pictures below and stay tuned for more updates from this duo in the future!

The post “Amers Perdus” by Michel Lauricella and Jean-Dominique Ferrucci in Paris, France appeared first on StreetArtNews.

Source: http://ift.tt/2ff4Qa9