Color Inspiration: Marc Jacobs Fall/Winter ’18 collection

Color Inspiration: Marc Jacobs Fall/Winter '18 Show

I’m always looking for inspiration for my projects and the world of fashion is always fertile ground to draw from. Last week, Marc Jacobs showed his FW18 collection at New York Fashion Week and it was a stunning affair. He sent down the runway a love letter to 1980’s haute couture, made up of exaggerated over coats, layers of scarves, and dramatic hats that transformed models into mysterious femme fatales.

What really spoke to me were the striking color combinations and the intense contrast of each piece that made the show all the more profound. The hues were vibrant and jewel-like, which radiated against deep shades of olive, plum, and blacks. The palette is certainly evocative of the 80’s but thanks to his styling and color pairings these look feel contemporary and of the now.

I’ve pulled swipe from Marc Jacobs personal and brand Instagrams to give a more comprehensive look of the output and the decisions that went into the clothes. I mean, how cool are the hairdos below? Those gradients are everything. Hopefully this sparks some ideas in your own work!

Color Inspiration: Marc Jacobs Fall/Winter '18 Show

Color Inspiration: Marc Jacobs Fall/Winter '18 Show

Color Inspiration: Marc Jacobs Fall/Winter '18 Show

Color Inspiration: Marc Jacobs Fall/Winter '18 Show

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Kate Ballis’ ‘Infra Realism’ series captures Palm Springs in an alien way

Kate Ballis' 'Infra Realism' photo series

If you combine Palm Springs, my favorite Los Angeles getaway location, and pair it with fluorescent shades of pinks, purple, and reds, you’ll grab my attention in a heartbeat. Kate Ballis, an Australian photographer who considers herself an “aestheticist,” creates pieces that capture and explore the natural world in a grounded, but other-worldly fashion.

Her series Infra Realism does exactly that, taking the arid deserts and lush mid-century homes of the Palm Springs area and captures them with infrared film. The result is a version of the city that looks like a Star Trek acid trip (I mean that in the best way possible!). Here’s her take, from last year’s interview with Another Magazine:

“Before this I produced the Glace Noir series, which is very dark and mysterious.” These images use a similar subversion by representing vast glaciers in a palette of inky blacks and blues. “Both projects actually have a lot in common, it’s about representing this otherworldliness, and infrared has simply given me another tool to express what I was already exploring.”

You can see more of Kate’s photography by clicking here.

Kate Ballis' 'Infra Realism' photo series

Kate Ballis' 'Infra Realism' photo series

Kate Ballis' 'Infra Realism' photo series

Kate Ballis' 'Infra Realism' photo series

Kate Ballis' 'Infra Realism' photo series

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Bold shapes inspired México’s Caribbean come to life in the work of Hola Lou

Hola Lou - Artist

Last year I came across the work of Hola Lou, a visual artist and graphic designer based in Mexico, who’s site I frequently visit to see what new pieces she’s added. Her style, inspired by her right now home of Mexico’s Caribbean, incorporates bold, geometric shapes brought to life by an invigorating color palette. This the kind of art I want to wake up to in the morning, that gives me a feeling of good energy and life.

Hola Lou - Paintings

Hola Lou - Prints

One thing I really appreciate about her online store is that she has a range of products at all different prices. If her original paintings are out of your price range you can snag one of her giclées or screen prints which are equally beautiful. She even has a “freebies” section where you can download some of her works as wallpapers for your mobile devices.

Hola Lou - Freebies

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Florence, an intimate love story experienced through a game

Florence,  an intimate love story experienced through a game

I remember my twenties as a very exciting but often frustrating time. I began to feel like the real me, the person I always wanted to be, but it was oftentimes fraught with frustration, self-doubt, and a steady stream of relationships that didn’t seem to go anywhere. So a game like Florence, if a game is really even the right word for it, strikes a chord with me, and I’m sure many others.

You experience the world of Florence Yeoh, a women in her twenties who feels a bit stuck in her daily routine. That is until she hears encounters Krish, a cello player performing in the park, and their relationship begins to unfold. The story is straightforward, but the experience that the team at Mountains has created truly makes you feel involved in Florence and Krish’s time together. From the App Store review:

There is a subtle beauty to Florence. This poignant love story intertwines a succinct narrative with smart interaction design to create moments of surprising emotional weight. Conversations are turned into puzzles that evolve as the characters’ moods shift. Memories fade into focus like old Polaroid photos. The way you touch the screen becomes just as important as the plot, which makes for a story you want to steer as well as follow.

What should also be mentioned is the brilliant art style of the game, which was lead by Ken Wong. It gives the experience such a warm and inviting feeling, one that you might experience in a graphic novel or a web comic. The simplified color palette is also a really nice touch.

You can download Florence for iPhone and iPad (coming to Android soon) by clicking here.

Florence,  an intimate love story experienced through a game

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The extraordinary outer and inner world’s of Eleanor Davis

American illustrator Eleanor Davis is giving me all the feelings this morning with her expressive and playful art style. I love that her work is expressed in different styles, sort of a hybrid of colored pencil and watercolor which gives everything this dreamy feeling. Beyond that I feel like she does a great job of illustrating subjects that are hard to define, like the second image below, which beautifully captures the idea of understanding Alzheimer’s.

You can check out more of Eleanor’s work by clicking here.

Eleanor Davis - Illustration

Eleanor Davis - Illustration

Eleanor Davis - Illustration

Eleanor Davis - Illustration

Eleanor Davis - Illustration

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The extraordinary outer and inner world’s of Eleanor Davis

American illustrator Eleanor Davis is giving me all the feelings this morning with her expressive and playful art style. I love that her work is expressed in different styles, sort of a hybrid of colored pencil and watercolor which gives everything this dreamy feeling. Beyond that I feel like she does a great job of illustrating subjects that are hard to define, like the second image below which beautifully captures the idea of understanding Alzheimer’s.

You can check out more of Eleanor’s work by clicking here.

Eleanor Davis - Illustration

Eleanor Davis - Illustration

Eleanor Davis - Illustration

Eleanor Davis - Illustration

Eleanor Davis - Illustration

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The extraordinary outer and inner world’s of Eleanor Davis

American illustrator Eleanor Davis is giving me all the feelings this morning with her expressive and playful art style. I love that her work is expressed in different styles, sort of a hybrid of colored pencil and watercolor which gives everything this dreamy feeling. Beyond that I feel like she does a great job of illustrating subjects that are hard to define, like the second image below which beautifully captures the idea of understanding Alzheimer’s.

You can check out more of Eleanor’s work by clicking here.

Eleanor Davis - Illustration

Eleanor Davis - Illustration

Eleanor Davis - Illustration

Eleanor Davis - Illustration

Eleanor Davis - Illustration

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Spotted: York freshens up their branding

New branding and logo for York - Peppermint Patties - Hershey

I stopped by the store last night for some much needed “post-airport craziness” bubbly wine, and I was waiting in line at the register I happened to notice a new logo and branding for York. You know, the Hershey company that makes peppermint patties.

The mark is a really nice evolution from the previous version, but what I specifically love about it is how the lettering mimics the look of the peppermint icing inside of a peppermint pattie. If you’ve ever taken a half bite of one of these the icing tends to be slightly stringy and a little messy, and the mark does a great job of mimicking that physical quality of the candy (quite literally in fact at the end of the circle container around the logo).

The letter forms themselves are way more elegant and considered. The old Y is kind of a hot mess balance-wise, with the over inflated upper and shrunken descender. The O to the R has a really nice playfulness, the K flows nicely into the circular container around it now, and I’m a big fan of the Y descending down and out of the blue container lozenge. Getting rid of the “Get the sensation!” tagline really helped the overall lock-up as it provides a lot of great negative space above and below the logo, giving it a much more elevated feeling overall.

New branding and logo for York - Peppermint Patties - Hershey

As you can see in the gross, conveyer belt photo I took below, they don’t seem to be printing that distracting dot pattern on the package which I think is a plus. I thought it was helpful to see how the metallic package is really quite striking with the pop of royal blue, and how the white of the logo has a nice contrast with the blue.

Overall, this is a beautifully refined word mark/focused branding effort that most consumers won’t notice, but clearly it’s remarkable enough for me to notice at a busy check stand. Now the big question: Anyone know who did the work? I’d love to be able to credit them! Email me if you have details.

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New Music: Nils Frahm’s ‘All Melody’ and Anenon’s ‘Tongue’

New Music: Nils Frahm's 'All Melody' and Anenon's 'Tongue'

I travelled to Portland over the weekend for some family matters, and as I was about to board the plane, I realized I didn’t have any music downloaded on to my phone for the trip, as it’s a newish phone. I hurriedly joined the always sketchy WiFi at LAX and was able to pull down two albums: Nils Frahm’s All Melody and Anenon’s Tongue.

As luck or fate would have it, the albums have a musical simpatico with each other. To me they share a sameness of DNA, a jazz backbone, layered with lush synthesizers, piano through lines that bring a lot of the works together. In my plane focused mind the works fused together in many ways, creating a dialogue that communicated beautifully.

Listen to Nils Frahm – All Melody: Spotify – Apple Music
Listen to Anenon – Tongue: Spotify – Apple Music


You can read more about Anenon’s song-by-song process in creating Tongue by clicking here, which seems like it was birthed from an amazing time spent in the Italian countryside.

Funkhaus - Saal 3 - Nils Frahm

Additionally, there’s a great look at where Frahm’s recorded All Melody over on The Spaces. Situated in East Berlin on the banks of the River Spree sits Funkhaus, a 1950’s building with Soviet architecture influences that was originally used to record chamber music. As you can see in the photo above it’s a beautiful space that must have been incredible to record in.

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Look! Look! Look!, a pink, pineapple shaped pavilion by Studio Morison

Look! Look! Look!, a pink, pineapple shaped pavilion by Studio Morison

Contrast in design creates striking moments. A great example of this is when you mix something new with something old. The Louvre Pyramid by I.M. Pei at the Louvre Palace is a perfect example of architectural contrast. Not all projects need to be quite so stark though as evidenced by this lovely pavilion intervention at Berrington Hall.

As described by it’s website, Berrington Hall is a “neo-classical mansion with fine interiors, set in landscape grounds,” a posh canvas for which Studio Morison introduced a giant, pink pineapple that’s origami in form. It’s funny because I feel like the pavilion is so different from the environment around it, but the fact that it’s set in a garden is very appropriate. Pineapple’s are grown in the ground, the pink color harkens back to a victorian color palette, and the origami form is very flower like overall.

It’s definitely a fun intervention that would bring a smile to the face of any person who came across it.

Look! Look! Look!, a pink, pineapple shaped pavilion by Studio Morison

Look! Look! Look!, a pink, pineapple shaped pavilion by Studio Morison

Look! Look! Look!, a pink, pineapple shaped pavilion by Studio Morison

Look! Look! Look!, a pink, pineapple shaped pavilion by Studio Morison

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