Weekend Round-Up: An Impenetrable Museum, An Astronomical Clock, And The Best Photos Of 2017

Hero.jpg?ixlib=rails 1.1

We’re back with yet another installment of the Weekend Round-Up. To say it’s been a strange week in the news would be an understatement, but there are still tons of fun, uplifting, and in no way problematic stories for you to read on a lazy Saturday morning. Check out the below, tune out the news cycle, and just relax. 

Enjoy.

Best Photos Of 2017 – National Geographic

Photography just has a way of conveying what words just sometimes cannot – a way of illustrating worlds and circumstances that we, in our respective bubbles, are often oblivious to. Nobody does it like National Geographic and William Daniels’ shot of the woman at a refugee camp in Bangladesh ( #31) is particularly powerful.

– Will Holloway, Director of Content

The Rewatchables: Zodiac – The Ringer

This podcast is always outstanding, and the latest episode is about one of my all-time favorite movies, David Fincher’s Zodiac. The hosts cover everything from why this incredible flick was snubbed by the big awards, how the performances hold up, and how it’s more of a workplace procedural than a crime thriller. Watch the movie, then give it a listen.

– Stephen Pulvirent, Managing Editor

Why The Getty Center’s Art Stayed Put As Fires Raged Nearby – The New York Times

For those of us into overly-engineered, extravagantly-expensive feats of human ingenuity, this explanation of why LA’s Getty Center chose not to evacuate its priceless art collection even as embers from the nearby Skirball wildfire licked at the front door is a fun (quick) read.

– Walker Tovin, Associate Designer

Jens Olsen’s World Clock – Atlas Obscura

The astronomical clock of Jens Olsen deserves to be better known. An incredibly complex timepiece whose designer was inspired by the great astronomical cathedral clock in Strasbourg. The slowest turning wheel in the clock rotates once every 25,753 years (showing one full cycle of the precession of the Equinoxes – that is, the wobble of Earth on its axis).

– Jack Forster, Editor-in-Chief

Riding A Time Capsule To Apartment 8G – The New York Times

This story shines a light on a superannuated technology found in some of New York’s oldest apartment buildings. The last time I was in an elevator that required manual “leveling” by a trained operator was in my father’s office in the mid-80s. Even back then the whole thing was akin to entering a time capsule.

–  Jon Bues, Senior Editor

Source: http://ift.tt/1IiKaDm

Weekend Round-Up: An Impenetrable Museum, An Astronomical Clock, And The Best Photos Of 2017

Hero.jpg?ixlib=rails 1.1

We’re back with yet another installment of the Weekend Round-Up. To say it’s been a strange week in the news would be an understatement, but there are still tons of fun, uplifting, and in no way problematic stories for you to read on a lazy Saturday morning. Check out the below, tune out the news cycle, and just relax. 

Enjoy.

Best Photos Of 2017 – National Geographic

Photography just has a way of conveying what words just sometimes cannot – a way of illustrating worlds and circumstances that we, in our respective bubbles, are often oblivious to. Nobody does it like National Geographic and William Daniels’ shot of the woman at a refugee camp in Bangladesh ( #31) is particularly powerful.

– Will Holloway, Director of Content

The Rewatchables: Zodiac – The Ringer

This podcast is always outstanding, and the latest episode is about one of my all-time favorite movies, David Fincher’s Zodiac. The hosts cover everything from why this incredible flick was snubbed by the big awards, how the performances hold up, and how it’s more of a workplace procedural than a crime thriller. Watch the movie, then give it a listen.

– Stephen Pulvirent, Managing Editor

Why The Getty Center’s Art Stayed Put As Fires Raged Nearby – The New York Times

For those of us into overly-engineered, extravagantly-expensive feats of human ingenuity, this explanation of why LA’s Getty Center chose not to evacuate its priceless art collection even as embers from the nearby Skirball wildfire licked at the front door is a fun (quick) read.

– Walker Tovin, Associate Designer

Jens Olsen’s World Clock – Atlas Obscura

The astronomical clock of Jens Olsen deserves to be better known. An incredibly complex timepiece whose designer was inspired by the great astronomical cathedral clock in Strasbourg. The slowest turning wheel in the clock rotates once every 25,753 years (showing one full cycle of the precession of the Equinoxes – that is, the wobble of Earth on its axis).

– Jack Forster, Editor-in-Chief

Riding A Time Capsule To Apartment 8G – The New York Times

This story shines a light on a superannuated technology found in some of New York’s oldest apartment buildings. The last time I was in an elevator that required manual “leveling” by a trained operator was in my father’s office in the mid-80s. Even back then the whole thing was akin to entering a time capsule.

–  Jon Bues, Senior Editor

Source: http://ift.tt/1IiKaDm

Weekend Round-Up: An Impenetrable Museum, An Astronomical Clock, And The Best Photos Of 2017

Hero.jpg?ixlib=rails 1.1

We’re back with yet another installment of the Weekend Round-Up. To say it’s been a strange week in the news would be an understatement, but there are still tons of fun, uplifting, and in no way problematic stories for you to read on a lazy Saturday morning. Check out the below, tune out the news cycle, and just relax. 

Enjoy.

Best Photos Of 2017 – National Geographic

Photography just has a way of conveying what words just sometimes cannot – a way of illustrating worlds and circumstances that we, in our respective bubbles, are often oblivious to. Nobody does it like National Geographic and William Daniels’ shot of the woman at a refugee camp in Bangladesh ( #31) is particularly powerful.

– Will Holloway, Director of Content

The Rewatchables: Zodiac – The Ringer

This podcast is always outstanding, and the latest episode is about one of my all-time favorite movies, David Fincher’s Zodiac. The hosts cover everything from why this incredible flick was snubbed by the big awards, how the performances hold up, and how it’s more of a workplace procedural than a crime thriller. Watch the movie, then give it a listen.

– Stephen Pulvirent, Managing Editor

Why The Getty Center’s Art Stayed Put As Fires Raged Nearby – The New York Times

For those of us into overly-engineered, extravagantly-expensive feats of human ingenuity, this explanation of why LA’s Getty Center chose not to evacuate its priceless art collection even as embers from the nearby Skirball wildfire licked at the front door is a fun (quick) read.

– Walker Tovin, Associate Designer

Jens Olsen’s World Clock – Atlas Obscura

The astronomical clock of Jens Olsen deserves to be better known. An incredibly complex timepiece whose designer was inspired by the great astronomical cathedral clock in Strasbourg. The slowest turning wheel in the clock rotates once every 25,753 years (showing one full cycle of the precession of the Equinoxes – that is, the wobble of Earth on its axis).

– Jack Forster, Editor-in-Chief

Riding A Time Capsule To Apartment 8G – The New York Times

This story shines a light on a superannuated technology found in some of New York’s oldest apartment buildings. The last time I was in an elevator that required manual “leveling” by a trained operator was in my father’s office in the mid-80s. Even back then the whole thing was akin to entering a time capsule.

–  Jon Bues, Senior Editor

Source: http://ift.tt/1IiKaDm

Le Roi des Oiseaux by Michel Lauricella and Jean-Dominique Ferrucci in Paris, France

Recently, some very interesting and similar style paste-ups have appeared on the streets of Paris… Turns out, these have been put up by two friends who share common artistic territories and the series are called “Le Collectif Aorte” by Michel Lauricella and Jean-Dominique Ferrucci. Michael is a drawer, sculptor, teacher of morphology drawings and book author. Jean-Dominique is a director, photographer and a visual artist.

“Le roi des oiseaux” (the king of the birds) paste-ups went up on Rue Toussaint Féron street in Paris and here’s a short description from Jean-Dominique on how this work came together…

The idea was to make a common work, and because we love Street Art, we decided to invest Street Art with a mix of our works… and we had a lot to learn on how to share and work together. Collective works are not so easy, and we had to find our own way. We respect each others work greatly. Maybe a bit too much at the beginning, so it was difficult to create a strong work without considering that each work was on a bigger work’s service. Now, it’s easier. And our common work is signed under “Le Collectif Aorte”.

It’s possible because we have some common deep streams, we talk about the books we read, the films we see, the doubts we have in art practice, the emotions we feel in life and how it influences our work…
 
We are interested and sensitive to the way people are treated in general, to migrants, to the bodies, to the differences… and without being religious, we are very touched by the sacred. And the question of the death is very present in our works. I am very moved by the animals and the relationship with them…
 
For this work, I think we wanted to make a proposition that can be interpreted in different ways, that was not too directive, without guiding too much the interpretations. And we had several discussions with people in the streets about the pictures, and it was very interesting to see that they had other ideas, feelings, interpretations… The street is the best, the most lively gallery! I think, what we like is that these images are just jumping in people’s faces and lives, we love the poetry that appears in life!
 
So we wanted to work with Michel’s portraits and the pictures I took of animals, dead or alive. And to mix them… Michel is drawing all the time. He draws nature, people, bodies, movement. He often draws models that are very special.. Sometimes, we feel they could be homeless, or survivors… of a terrible thing… that’s just life.  And I make some boxes, reliquaries with dead birds, that I found in voodoo markets in Africa, or dead in landscapes, and now friends bring me some when they find some (already dead, of course) so I can photograph them.
 
The birds of this series were found dead in the nature and I photographed them. The dog with the drawing of the old lady, I photographed him during the night in India. He was a stray dog. A bit like the men Michel often draws… they look like stray men.
 
So we scan Michel’s drawings, portraits and we try to add them an animal. We are looking for a very graphic image, with a strong solemnity but also with tenderness. We try to make a composition that tells something about the relationship between people and an animal…
 
So we move, we adjust the images with photoshop, we try, until we find a certain emotion, until we imagine a story…
 
There’s this man with this bird in his arms, like a pieta. There’s this same man in the wing (arm?) of this white bird in the sky. He is a kind of a Christ (we like the figure of the Christ). And there’s this old lady with the lost dog… you just have to look at old ladies in the street when they have a dog to imagine the strength of their relationship, to imagine the emptiness in their lives when the dog dies…
 
At this time, we don’t ask any authorisation, we just do it. We try not to be too decorative. But emotional! We try to have a message, but without being too prescriptive, and to offer many signs of interpretation… we try this.

 

Check out all of the works below and stay tuned for more updates from “Le Collectif Aorte” works in Paris soon!

The post Le Roi des Oiseaux by Michel Lauricella and Jean-Dominique Ferrucci in Paris, France appeared first on StreetArtNews.

Source: http://ift.tt/2ff4Qa9

Le Roi des Oiseaux by Michel Lauricella and Jean-Dominique Ferrucci in Paris, France

Recently, some very interesting and similar style paste-ups have appeared on the streets of Paris… Turns out, these have been put up by two friends who share common artistic territories and the series are called “Le Collectif Aorte” by Michel Lauricella and Jean-Dominique Ferrucci. Michael is a drawer, sculptor, teacher of morphology drawings and book author. Jean-Dominique is a director, photographer and a visual artist.

“Le roi des oiseaux” (the king of the birds) paste-ups went up on Rue Toussaint Féron street in Paris and here’s a short description from Jean-Dominique on how this work came together…

The idea was to make a common work, and because we love Street Art, we decided to invest Street Art with a mix of our works… and we had a lot to learn on how to share and work together. Collective works are not so easy, and we had to find our own way. We respect each others work greatly. Maybe a bit too much at the beginning, so it was difficult to create a strong work without considering that each work was on a bigger work’s service. Now, it’s easier. And our common work is signed under “Le Collectif Aorte”.

It’s possible because we have some common deep streams, we talk about the books we read, the films we see, the doubts we have in art practice, the emotions we feel in life and how it influences our work…
 
We are interested and sensitive to the way people are treated in general, to migrants, to the bodies, to the differences… and without being religious, we are very touched by the sacred. And the question of the death is very present in our works. I am very moved by the animals and the relationship with them…
 
For this work, I think we wanted to make a proposition that can be interpreted in different ways, that was not too directive, without guiding too much the interpretations. And we had several discussions with people in the streets about the pictures, and it was very interesting to see that they had other ideas, feelings, interpretations… The street is the best, the most lively gallery! I think, what we like is that these images are just jumping in people’s faces and lives, we love the poetry that appears in life!
 
So we wanted to work with Michel’s portraits and the pictures I took of animals, dead or alive. And to mix them… Michel is drawing all the time. He draws nature, people, bodies, movement. He often draws models that are very special.. Sometimes, we feel they could be homeless, or survivors… of a terrible thing… that’s just life.  And I make some boxes, reliquaries with dead birds, that I found in voodoo markets in Africa, or dead in landscapes, and now friends bring me some when they find some (already dead, of course) so I can photograph them.
 
The birds of this series were found dead in the nature and I photographed them. The dog with the drawing of the old lady, I photographed him during the night in India. He was a stray dog. A bit like the men Michel often draws… they look like stray men.
 
So we scan Michel’s drawings, portraits and we try to add them an animal. We are looking for a very graphic image, with a strong solemnity but also with tenderness. We try to make a composition that tells something about the relationship between people and an animal…
 
So we move, we adjust the images with photoshop, we try, until we find a certain emotion, until we imagine a story…
 
There’s this man with this bird in his arms, like a pieta. There’s this same man in the wing (arm?) of this white bird in the sky. He is a kind of a Christ (we like the figure of the Christ). And there’s this old lady with the lost dog… you just have to look at old ladies in the street when they have a dog to imagine the strength of their relationship, to imagine the emptiness in their lives when the dog dies…
 
At this time, we don’t ask any authorisation, we just do it. We try not to be too decorative. But emotional! We try to have a message, but without being too prescriptive, and to offer many signs of interpretation… we try this.

 

Check out all of the works below and stay tuned for more updates from “Le Collectif Aorte” works in Paris soon!

The post Le Roi des Oiseaux by Michel Lauricella and Jean-Dominique Ferrucci in Paris, France appeared first on StreetArtNews.

Source: http://ift.tt/2ff4Qa9

100 Fiberglass and Resin Skulls Fill a Room at the National Gallery of Victoria in Melbourne

Ron Mueck, an Australian artist known for his hyperrealistic figural sculptures, has created his largest work to date. His installation Mass contains 100 human skulls which are scattered and stacked throughout a gallery at the National Gallery of Victoria in Melbourne, Australia.

The individual forms are created from fiberglass and resin, and when stood upright, rise to approximately three feet tall. In some areas of the installation piles reach five skulls in height, while in others visitors can approach individual works resting on the gallery’s floor. Placed amongst gilded paintings the works offer a somber reality, a morose peek into what physically relates each of us.

Mass opens December 15, 2017 as a part of the inaugural National Gallery of Victoria Triennial. Mueck is one of 100 international creatives that has contributed work to the exhibition which will run through April 18, 2018. (via Designboom)

Source: http://ift.tt/odnItH

“Broken” by INO in Fortaleza, Brazil

Greek artist INO was invited to paint in the 4th edition of Festival Concreto  that happened in Fortaleza city, Brazil.

A place that anyone can see very large contradictions, the poverty in the street, people begging for food while you eat at the restaurant, the prostitutes every night on the streets. All these mix together with the luxury, the expensive apartments in huge buildings that look empty, the barbwires on the fences of each condominium yard.

Known for his provocative images and after he was given a wall of a luxury hotel (51m high), INO had the chance to emphasise the phenomenon of prostitution. He painted a picture of a naked thin woman on a position of offering her body with a black splash coming out of her head and named it “Broken”. Because of the strong sun, INO was also working at night. Every night under the building, there were women selling their body. (photo from the lift attached)

The post “Broken” by INO in Fortaleza, Brazil appeared first on StreetArtNews.

Source: http://ift.tt/2ff4Qa9

“Broken” by INO in Fortaleza, Brazil

Greek artist INO was invited to paint in the 4th edition of Festival Concreto  that happened in Fortaleza city, Brazil.

A place that anyone can see very large contradictions, the poverty in the street, people begging for food while you eat at the restaurant, the prostitutes every night on the streets. All these mix together with the luxury, the expensive apartments in huge buildings that look empty, the barbwires on the fences of each condominium yard.

Known for his provocative images and after he was given a wall of a luxury hotel (51m high), INO had the chance to emphasise the phenomenon of prostitution. He painted a picture of a naked thin woman on a position of offering her body with a black splash coming out of her head and named it “Broken”. Because of the strong sun, INO was also working at night. Every night under the building, there were women selling their body. (photo from the lift attached)

The post “Broken” by INO in Fortaleza, Brazil appeared first on StreetArtNews.

Source: http://ift.tt/2ff4Qa9

Photo Report: Roger W. Smith At The Horological Society Of New York

L1006999.jpg?ixlib=rails 1.1

On December 4, 2017, Roger W. Smith lectured at the Horological Society of New York (HSNY) on the development of practical watch escapements. The large crowd was enthusiastic to hear Smith speak and to meet him in person, with many attendees lining up after the lecture to ask for autographs and photos. This guy is a (humble) horological rockstar if there ever was one. 

A group of watchmaking students attended the lecture from both Rolex’s Lititz Watch Technicum in Pennsylvania and the Patek Philippe Watchmaking School here in New York City, and a handful of people flew in to NYC to attend the much-anticipated lecture. The Sunday before Smith’s lecture at HSNY, he guest instructed a special horological education class for six lucky students. The class was an opportunity for students to learn from one of the world’s leading watchmakers, over an afternoon in Brooklyn.

Roger W. Smith at the Horological Society of New York

Smith describing the functionality of the cylinder escapement.

<p>Smith speaking with attendees after his lecture.</p>

Smith speaking with attendees after his lecture.

<p>Watchmaking students from the Rolex and Patek Philippe schools being recognized before Smith's lecture.</p>

Watchmaking students from the Rolex and Patek Philippe schools being recognized before Smith’s lecture.

Roger W. Smith at the Horological Society of New York

Smith lecturing at the Horological Society of New York.

<p>Smith discussing escapement mechanics.</p>

Smith discussing escapement mechanics.

<p>Smith speaking with Tom Wilcox, Executive Director of the National Association of Watch &amp; Clock Collectors.</p>

Smith speaking with Tom Wilcox, Executive Director of the National Association of Watch & Clock Collectors.

Roger W. Smith at the Horological Society of New York

Smith lecturing at the Horological Society of New York.

Roger W. Smith at the Horological Society of New York

Smith wearing a Series 2 Open Dial watch.

Sunday, December 3, 2017: Horological Education Class In Brooklyn

Smith instructing a horological education class.

Smith instructing a horological education class.

<p>Smith demonstrating balance installation to the students.</p>

Smith demonstrating balance installation to the students.

<p>Smith instructing a horological education class.</p>

Smith instructing a horological education class.

Smith instructing a horological education class.

Smith assisting a student.

Bonus: Video Recording Of Smith’s Lecture

All HSNY lectures are video recorded and made available to HSNY members. For Smith’s lecture, HSNY has made the video recording available to the public. Enjoy!

For more information, visit the Horological Society of New York’s website.

HODINKEE is a sponsor of the Horological Society of New York.

Photographs by Atom Moore and Liam O’Donnell.

Source: http://ift.tt/1IiKaDm

Photo Report: Roger W. Smith At The Horological Society Of New York

L1006999.jpg?ixlib=rails 1.1

On December 4, 2017, Roger W. Smith lectured at the Horological Society of New York (HSNY) on the development of practical watch escapements. The large crowd was enthusiastic to hear Smith speak and to meet him in person, with many attendees lining up after the lecture to ask for autographs and photos. This guy is a (humble) horological rockstar if there ever was one. 

A group of watchmaking students attended the lecture from both Rolex’s Lititz Watch Technicum in Pennsylvania and the Patek Philippe Watchmaking School here in New York City, and a handful of people flew in to NYC to attend the much-anticipated lecture. The Sunday before Smith’s lecture at HSNY, he guest instructed a special horological education class for six lucky students. The class was an opportunity for students to learn from one of the world’s leading watchmakers, over an afternoon in Brooklyn.

Roger W. Smith at the Horological Society of New York

Smith describing the functionality of the cylinder escapement.

<p>Smith speaking with attendees after his lecture.</p>

Smith speaking with attendees after his lecture.

<p>Watchmaking students from the Rolex and Patek Philippe schools being recognized before Smith's lecture.</p>

Watchmaking students from the Rolex and Patek Philippe schools being recognized before Smith’s lecture.

Roger W. Smith at the Horological Society of New York

Smith lecturing at the Horological Society of New York.

<p>Smith discussing escapement mechanics.</p>

Smith discussing escapement mechanics.

<p>Smith speaking with Tom Wilcox, Executive Director of the National Association of Watch &amp; Clock Collectors.</p>

Smith speaking with Tom Wilcox, Executive Director of the National Association of Watch & Clock Collectors.

Roger W. Smith at the Horological Society of New York

Smith lecturing at the Horological Society of New York.

Roger W. Smith at the Horological Society of New York

Smith wearing a Series 2 Open Dial watch.

Sunday, December 3, 2017: Horological Education Class In Brooklyn

Smith instructing a horological education class.

Smith instructing a horological education class.

<p>Smith demonstrating balance installation to the students.</p>

Smith demonstrating balance installation to the students.

<p>Smith instructing a horological education class.</p>

Smith instructing a horological education class.

Smith instructing a horological education class.

Smith assisting a student.

Bonus: Video Recording Of Smith’s Lecture

All HSNY lectures are video recorded and made available to HSNY members. For Smith’s lecture, HSNY has made the video recording available to the public. Enjoy!

For more information, visit the Horological Society of New York’s website.

HODINKEE is a sponsor of the Horological Society of New York.

Photographs by Atom Moore and Liam O’Donnell.

Source: http://ift.tt/1IiKaDm