Grant Green – The Complete Quartets With Sonny Clark II

Just like rice and beans, Grant Green and Sonny Clark created a synergy that was more than the sum of its parts. Nowhere is that more apparent than on "The Complete Quartets," where there were no horns competing for solos. The elegant, laid-back style that characterizes these recordings was the one in which both Green and Clark seemed most comfortable, and it shows. Ironically, neither Green nor Clark was around to see any of this music released. Apparently due to Green’s prodigious output in the early ’60’s, Blue Note decided to shelve these "less commercial" recordings in favor of his more groove-oriented soul-jazz material. The wrong was corrected in 1980, when "Nigeria," "Gooden’s Corner," and "Oleo" were released, combining to contain all the music found here except for a couple alternates. My opinion is that these tunes swing as hard as anything I’ve heard, and that their appeal runs the gamut — there is nothing not to like. Green’s delicious riffs flow from his guitar like water from a glacier, and the analogy of melting ice shouldn’t be lost; the mood here is so "cool" it burns. This is the type of music whose implied swing is so ferocious it has you on the edge of your seat howling with ecstasy. The highlight of the first disc is Gershwin’s chestnut "It Ain’t Necessarily So," which clocks in as the longest of the set at 10:20. Drummer Art Blakey starts things off with a subtly Latin 12/8 groove as Green joins him and sympathetic bassist Sam Jones with a decidedly loose interpretation of the melody. Blakey kicks into a straight four rhythm as Green’s guitar sails over the changes, accompanied by Sonny Clark’s bluesy punches and full keyboard slides. Blakey, overcome with the irresistability of the music, starts hootin’ and hollerin’ as Clark takes his solo. Clark, like Green, is a master of understatement and uses this to full advantage by teasing the listener with half-finished motifs drenched with the blues. As he gets ready to turn the melody back over to Green, Blakey insists for him to continue – "No, go ahead, go ahead" – a revelatory glance into the atmosphere of the session. The immensely likeable playing is augmented by excellent song selection, with some standouts being a smokin’ "The Song is You," "On Green Dolphin Street," Henri Mancini’s "Moon River," "Tune Up," and a "My Favorite Things" that stays much truer to the heart of the tune than any of Coltrane’s more impassioned renditions. Full of intuition, soul, and swing, and lacking in pretense, "The Complete Quartets with Sonny Clark" has me asking myself"does music get any better than this?" – by Reid Thompson, AllAboutJazz.com

Artist: Grant Green
Album: The Complete Quartets With Sonny Clark I-II
Label: Blue Note Records (1999, SBM Reissue)
Year: 1961-1962
Runtime:
CD2 63:10

CD2 Tracks:
01.  Moon River (Henry Mancini/Johnny Mercer) 5:34
02.  Gooden’s Corner (Grant Green) 8:11
03.  Two For One (Grant Green) 7:38
04.  Oleo (Sonny Rollins) 5:35
05.  Little Girl Blue (Lorenz Hart/Richard Rodgers) 7:12
06.  Tune Up (Miles Davis) 7:17
07.  Hip Funk (Grant Green) 8:35
08.  My Favourite Things (Oscar Hammerstein II/Richard Rodgers) 8:28
09.  Oleo (Alternate Take) (Sonny Rollins) 6:00

Personnel:
Grant Green (Guitar)
Sonny Clark (Piano)
Sam Jones (Double Bass)
Louis Hayes (Drums) Source: http://ift.tt/2eRoURb

Grant Green – The Complete Quartets With Sonny Clark I

Just like rice and beans, Grant Green and Sonny Clark created a synergy that was more than the sum of its parts. Nowhere is that more apparent than on "The Complete Quartets," where there were no horns competing for solos. The elegant, laid-back style that characterizes these recordings was the one in which both Green and Clark seemed most comfortable, and it shows. Ironically, neither Green nor Clark was around to see any of this music released. Apparently due to Green’s prodigious output in the early ’60’s, Blue Note decided to shelve these "less commercial" recordings in favor of his more groove-oriented soul-jazz material. The wrong was corrected in 1980, when "Nigeria," "Gooden’s Corner," and "Oleo" were released, combining to contain all the music found here except for a couple alternates. My opinion is that these tunes swing as hard as anything I’ve heard, and that their appeal runs the gamut — there is nothing not to like. Green’s delicious riffs flow from his guitar like water from a glacier, and the analogy of melting ice shouldn’t be lost; the mood here is so "cool" it burns. This is the type of music whose implied swing is so ferocious it has you on the edge of your seat howling with ecstasy. The highlight of the first disc is Gershwin’s chestnut "It Ain’t Necessarily So," which clocks in as the longest of the set at 10:20. Drummer Art Blakey starts things off with a subtly Latin 12/8 groove as Green joins him and sympathetic bassist Sam Jones with a decidedly loose interpretation of the melody. Blakey kicks into a straight four rhythm as Green’s guitar sails over the changes, accompanied by Sonny Clark’s bluesy punches and full keyboard slides. Blakey, overcome with the irresistability of the music, starts hootin’ and hollerin’ as Clark takes his solo. Clark, like Green, is a master of understatement and uses this to full advantage by teasing the listener with half-finished motifs drenched with the blues. As he gets ready to turn the melody back over to Green, Blakey insists for him to continue – "No, go ahead, go ahead" – a revelatory glance into the atmosphere of the session. The immensely likeable playing is augmented by excellent song selection, with some standouts being a smokin’ "The Song is You," "On Green Dolphin Street," Henri Mancini’s "Moon River," "Tune Up," and a "My Favorite Things" that stays much truer to the heart of the tune than any of Coltrane’s more impassioned renditions. Full of intuition, soul, and swing, and lacking in pretense, "The Complete Quartets with Sonny Clark" has me asking myself"does music get any better than this?" – by Reid Thompson, AllAboutJazz.com

Artist: Grant Green
Album: The Complete Quartets With Sonny Clark I-II
Label: Blue Note Records (1999, SBM Reissue)
Year: 1961-1962
Runtime:
CD1 62:20

CD1 Tracks:
1.  Airegin (Sonny Rollins) 7:32
2.  It Ain’t Necessarily So (George Gershwin/Ira Gershwin) 10:20
3.  I Concentrate On You (Cole Porter)5:40
4.  The Things We Did Last Summer (Sammy Cahn/Jule Styne) 5:54
5.  The Song Is You (Oscar Hammerstein II/Jerome Kern) 7:44
6.  Nancy (With The Laughing Face) (James Van Heusen/Phil Silvers) 6:20
7.  Airegin (Alternate Take) (Sonny Rollins) 7:34
8.  On Green Dolphin Street (Bronislaw Kaper/Ned Washington) 6:25
9.  Shadrack (Robert MacGimsey) 6:20
10.  What Is This Thing Called Love (Cole Porter) 5:49 

Personnel:
Grant Green (Guitar)
Sonny Clark (Piano)
Sam Jones (Double Bass)
Art Blakey (Drums) Source: http://ift.tt/2eRoURb

Jan Garbarek – In Praise of Dreams

It has been six years since saxophonist/composer Jan Garbarek issued a new recording under his own name. For In Praise of Dreams Garbarek enlisted violist Kim Kashkashian and frequent collaborator Manu Katché on drums. Garbarek, who composed the album’s 11 selections, plays saxophones as well as a host of keyboards and percussion, while Katché plays acoustic and electronic drums along with Kashkashian’s viola. In many ways this is the most radical recording that Garbarek has ever issued, but not because it’s outside — quite the opposite. This is easily the warmest, most accessible outing Garbarek has ever issued because though there are no vocals, Garbarek has clearly written "songs" on this set, with identifiable structures that are followed almost throughout. Though he is no stranger to the form, having employed it almost continually for the last 20 years, he has never engaged it so thoroughly and completely. Previously, he has engaged improvisation to get song to the breaking point and move it somewhere else. Here it is always present; surprise happens inside the formal frameworks of these compositions. Beautiful, soulful lines underscore and recontextualize the saxophonist’s trademark Nordic iciness of tone on the opener, "As Seen from Above," with its spiraling soprano, lush keyboards, and hypnotic loops. In its warmth, it comes very close to a distinctly European kind of groove/soul-jazz. The interplay between Kashkashian and Garbarek on the title track offers rounded, multidimensional sonorities winding through the intro before spilling into a call-and-response melody. The repetitive keyboard line and Katché’s mantra-like drumming under the loops draw the listener inside the song’s heart and extend the edge for the front line. The restrained romanticism shown by Kashkashian on her nocturnal solo intro to "One Goes There Alone" is nearly breathtaking. As it gives way to the tune itself, it’s slow, reflective, and rooted deeply in the tension created between percussion and Garbarek’s minimal backing response lines. When he solos later in the tune, he’s clearly blowing blues into her elegiac line. The blues notion continues in his phrasing on "Knot of Place and Time," slipping through the landscape of Kashkashian’s elegant, near heartbreakingly poetic soundscape. And so it goes. Things get more speculative on "Scene from Afar" and "Cloud of Unknowing," but it hardly matters since these song forms are nonetheless immediately recognizable, presenting the nether side of the equation. It emerges again with "Conversation With a Stone" and whispers to a close with "A Tale Begun," a mantra-like duet that closes this strong set that will undoubtedly, if it gets the opportunity to be heard, garner Jan Garbarek some new fans. Poetic, moving, and marvelous, In Praise of Dreams is a welcome return. – by Thom Yurek, AMG

Artist: Jan Garbarek
Album: In Praise of Dreams
Year: 2004
Label: ECM
Runtime: 52:25
Recorded at the Blue Jay Recording Studio (Carlisle, USA, 2003)) 

Tracks:
1.  As Seen From Above 4:44 
2.  In Praise Of Dreams 5:25 
3.  One Goes There Alone 5:09 
4.  Knot Of Place And Time 6:27 
5.  If You Go Far Enough 0:44 
6.  Scene From Afar 5:19 
7.  Cloud Of Unknowing 5:26 
8.  Without A Visible Sign 5:04 
9.  Iceburn 5:03 
10.  Conversation With A Stone 4:25 
11.  A Tale Begun 4:39 
All music by Jan Garbarek

Personnel:
Jan Garbarek (Tenor Saxophone, Soprano Saxophone, Synthesizer, Percussion)
Kim Kashkashian (Viola)
Manu Katche (Drums, Loops) Source: http://ift.tt/2eRoURb

Grant Green – Talkin’ About!

On the heels of Matador and Solid, two of his most advanced albums, Grant Green decided to continue the more modal direction he’d begun pursuing with the help of members of Coltrane’s quartet. Accordingly, he hooked up with organist Larry Young, who was just beginning to come into his own as the first Hammond B-3 player to incorporate Coltrane’s modal innovations into his own style. Talkin’ About is the first of three albums the Green/Young team recorded together with Coltrane drummer Elvin Jones, and it’s exceptional, one of the most underrated items in Green’s discography. With just a basic organ trio lineup, the album works a fascinating middle ground between the soul-jazz of Green’s early days and the modal flavor of his most recent work. Though Young’s style wasn’t quite fully formed yet, he’s no longer the in-the-pocket Jimmy Smith disciple of his earliest sessions; his playing here is far more adventurous than the typical soul-jazz date, both harmonically and rhythmically. Jones and Young often play off one another to create an intricate, percolating pulse that’s miles ahead of the standard soul-jazz groove. The trio’s interplay is best showcased on Young’s Coltrane tribute, "Talkin’ About J.C.," a monster jam that’s worth every one of its nearly 12 minutes, and the cheerful "I’m an Old Cowhand," popularized as a jazz tune by Sonny Rollins. Meanwhile, Young and Green positively shimmer together on the ballad numbers, "People" and "You Don’t Know What Love Is." It all makes for a terrific album that ranks in Green’s uppermost echelon. – by Steve Huey, AMG

Artist: Grant Green
Album: Talkin’ About!
Year: 1964
Label: Blue Note Records (24bit remastered, 1999)
Recorded at the Van Gelder Recording Studio, Englewood Cliff, NJ, USA (09.11.1964)

Tracks:
1.  Talkin’ About J.C. (Larry Young) 11:45
2.  People (Bob Merrill/Jule Styne) 7:28
3.  Luny Tune (Larry Young) 7:43
4.  You Don’t Know What Love Is (Gene DePaul/Don Raye) 7:38
5.  I’m an Old Cowhand (Johnny Mercer) 6:31

Personnel:
Grant Green (Guitar)
Larry Young (Organ)

Elvin Jones (Drums) Source: http://ift.tt/2eRoURb

Abbey Lincoln – Who Used To Dance

Abbey Lincoln, 65 at the time of this recording, still had a reasonably strong voice at this point in her career, and although she showed signs of mellowing now and then, she was still capable of performing fiery musical statements. This Verve release mostly emphasizes slow tempos and melancholy moods. The nostalgic "Who Used to Dance" (featuring Savion Glover’s tapdancing) is a highlight, and "Street of Dreams" works well, although "Mr. Tambourine Man" is not too essential. Six different saxophonists (five of them altoists) appear on the date (usually one on a song), and despite the diversity in styles (from Steve Coleman to Frank Morgan), their subsidiary roles and respectful playing find them all sounding fairly similar. An interesting but not overly essential outing. – by Scott Yanow, AMG

Artist: Abbey Lincoln
Album: Who Used To Dance
Year: 1997
Label: Verve Records
Runtime: 61:29
Recorded at the Clinton Recording Studios, New York City, April-May, 1996

Tracks:
1.  Love Has Gone Away (Abbey Lincoln) 7:34
2.  Who Used To Dance (Abbey Lincoln) 9:41
3.  Love Lament (R.B. Lynch) 7:14
4.  Mr. Tambourine Man (Bob Dylan) 6:55
5.  When Autumn Sings (R.B. Lynch) 4:09
6.  Love What You Doin’ (Abbey Lincoln) 8:27
7.  Street Of Dreams (Sam Lewis/Victor Young) 6:36
8.  I Sing A Song (Abbey Lincoln) 5:50
9.  The River (Abbey Lincoln) 5:00

Personnel:
Abbey Lincoln (Vocals)
Marc Cary (Piano) – 1-8
Michael Bowie (Double Bass) – 1-8
Aaron Walker (Drums and Percussion) – 1,2,4,7,8
Alvester Garnett (Drums) – 2,5,6
Steve Coleman (Alto Saxophone) – 1,6,7
Oliver Lake (Alto Saxophone) – 6,9
Frank Morgan (Alto Saxophone) – 3,5
Riley T. Bandy (Alto Saxophone) – 6,8
Savion Glover (Tap Dance) – 2
Julien Lourau (Tenor Saxophone) – 4
Justin Robinson (Alto Saxophone) – 9
Graham Haynes (Cornet) – 9
Rodney Kendrick (Piano) – 9
John Ormond (Double Bass) – 9
Turu Alexander (Drums) – 9
Bazzi Bartholomew (Backing Vocals) – 9
Arthur Green (Backing Vocals) – 9

Source: http://ift.tt/2eRoURb

Erik Truffaz – Out Of A Dream

1996 : we now play in 4te, Patrick Muller has joined the band. He brings with him an undeniable colour, that of liberty. We record Out of dream in the autumn. Habib Achour proposes it to the producer of EMI, Michel Mouster. Blue Note USA decides to increase production by giving majors of each country the possibility of signing new artists. We will be the first French band to release on that mythical label in February 1997. –

From Erik’s website

Truffaz has experimented with electronica-tinged dance music and ensemble improvisation, but on his 1997 major label debut Out Of A Dream, he channels the spirit and sound of Miles Davis. The way Truffaz delicately and economically phrases smatterings of thin warm notes begs comparison with Miles. But Truffaz doesn’t just play parrot here, he takes that classic sound and wraps it around a bunch of elegant tunes that you’d swear were laid down decades ago. With a title like Out Of A Dream, one would expect this album to be a languid affair, and it doesn’t disappoint. Truffaz and his quintet spin one mid-tempo ballad into another, each track a strand of golden sunshine piercing through gray rainclouds. ‘Down Town’ opens with Truffaz blowing simple figures on his trumpet before the rest of the group jump in and kick the track into gear. The way Truffaz darts around his band’s interlocking groove cannot fail to bring to mind the first famous quintet of Miles Davis. But it’s the title track – a deceptively complex ballad that sounds every bit like a lazy Saturday morning in bed – that sets the pace for the entire album. Truffaz has made a game effort to deflect the depth of Miles’ influence upon his sound. Obviously, the bulls eye that comes with such a comparison is daunting enough, but any artist worth their salt strives to be original and not just some two-cent carbon copy of the real deal. So Truffaz says things like “My band sounds like itself” while the biography on his website admits that hearing Kind Of Blue as a 16 year old changed his life and sent him into a career in music. But Truffaz needn’t worry about dodging such lofty comparisons. Out Of A Dream sounds unavoidably like Miles, but it retains enough of his magic and genius – things that can’t merely be

copied rote – that it comes off like a long lost album from the great trumpeter’s archive. And that’s meant as a compliment – one of the biggest I can think of, actually. –

dk.presents.wordpress.com

Artist: Erik Truffaz

Album: Out Of A Dream

Year: 1997

Label: Blue Note Records

Runtime: 49:46

Recorded at Studio Village (Montpellier, France), February, 1996

Tracks:

1.  Down Town 2:01

2.  Out of a Dream 7:36

3.  Beaute Bleue 5:59

4.  Wet in Paris 6:24

5.  Porta Camollia 5:21

6.  Indigo 5:49

7.  Saisir 3:55

8.  Elegie 3:23

9.  Samara 5:24

10.  Up Town 2:11

11.  Betty 1:42

All compositions by Erik Truffaz 

Personnel:

Erik Truffaz (Trumpet and Flugelhorn)

Cyrille Bugnon (Tenor and Alto Saxophone)

Patrick Muller (Piano)

Marcello Giuliani (Double Bass)

Marc Erbetta (Drums)

Source: http://ift.tt/2eRoURb

Hugh Masakela – The Lasting Impressions Of Ooga Booga

In patching together a program of Hugh Masekela’s MGM recordings onto a single overstuffed CD, Verve took the original The Americanization of Ooga Booga album, leapfrogged over its successor, Next Album, and coupled it with the third MGM LP, The Lasting Impressions of Hugh Masekela. That made good sense since the two albums originate from the same live date at the Village Gate, recorded when the trumpeter was still in the process of making an impression in the U.S. Masekela is full of wild, sputtering, high-rolling exuberance, developing some of his familiar signature trumpet riffs, freely exploring South African rhythms, harmonic sequences, and chants, and mixing them with soul-jazz at a time when hardly anyone else would bother (the mixture of township jive and jazz works especially well on "U-Dwi"). He also ties into Brazil with a fine rendition of Jorge Ben’s "Mas Que Nada" and assimilates Coltrane into his bloodstream with a tribute called "Mixolydia." In general, the Americanization tracks are the picks of the crop (Impressions, after all, had been compiled in 1968 to cash in on Masekela’s surprise number one single, "Grazing in the Grass"). With the rhythm section of Larry Willis on piano, Harold Dotson on bass, and Henry Jenkins on drums, this music still holds up marvelously today. – by Richard S. Ginell, AMG

Artist: Hugh Masakela
Album: The Lasting Impressions of Ooga Booga
Year: 1965 (MGM Records)
Label: Verve Records (1996)
Runtime: 78:43
Recorded live at the Village Gate, NYC, in 1965

Tracks:
1.  Bajabula Bonke (Miriam Makeba) 8:05
2.  Dzinorabiro (Miriam Makeba) 6:38
3.  Unhlanhia (Miriam Makeba) 5:22
4.  Cantelope Island (Herbie Hancock) 5:29
5.  U-dwi (Hugh Masekela) 5:25
6.  Masquenada (Jorge Ben) 7:43
7.  Abangoma (Miriam Makeba) 4:04
8.  Mixloydia (Hugh Masekela) 7:00
9.  Con Mucho Caarino (Larry Willis) 4:41
10.  Where Are You Going? (Hugh Masekela) 7:42
11.  Morolo (Hugh Masekela) 5:06
12.  Bo Masekela (Caiphus Semenya) 4:39
13.  Unohilo (Alan Salinga) 6:49

Personnel:
Hugh Masekela (Trumpet and Vocals)
Larry Willis (Piano)
Harold Dotson (Double Bass)
Henry Jenkins (Drums) Source: http://ift.tt/2eRoURb

Bob Stewart – Goin’ Home

The second recording by tuba player Bob Stewart’s First Line Band is even better than the first. In 1988, Stewart’s group also included trumpeter James Zoller, trombonist Steve Turre, guitarist Jerome Harris and either Buddy Williams or Ed Blackwell on drums; trumpeter Earl Gardner and John Clark on French horn have guest spots on this CD. The music ranges from the straightforward swing of Don Cherry’s "Art Deco" and a good-humored "Sweet Georgia Brown" to a 121-minute exploration of Billy Harper’s "Priestess" and originals by Stewart, Olu Dara and Kelvyn Bell. Stimulating and often-surprising music that is generally more accessible than one might expect. – by Scott Yanow, AMG

Artist: Bob Stewart
Album: Goin’ Home
Year: 1989
Label: JMT Productions
Runtime: 49:43
Recorded at the RPM Studios (New York City, USA) in December, 1988

Tracks:
1.  Subi La Nas Alturas (Kelvyn Bell) 7:04
2.  Art Deco (Don Cherry) 6:14
3.  Bell And Ponce (Olu Dara) 6:00
4.  Tunk (Bob Stewart) 6:55
5.  Sugar Finger (Traditional)5:33
6.  Sweet Georgia Brown Sweet Medley
  – Sweet Georgia Brown (Ben Bernie / Kenneth Casey / Maceo Pinkard) 3:59
  – Windmill (Kenny Dorham) 0:39
  – Donna (Jackie McLean) 0:35
7.  Priestess (Billy Harper) 12:37

Personnel:
Bob Stewart (Tuba)
James Zoller (Trumpet)
Steve Turre (Trombone)
Jerome Harris (Guitar)
Buddy Williams (Drums) – 1,3,5-7
Earl Gardner (Trumpet) – 1,7
Ed Blackwell (Drums) – 2,4
Frank Colon (Percussion) – 1,5
John Clark (French Horn) – 7 Source: http://ift.tt/2eRoURb

Barabás Lőrinc Eklektric – Ladal

A delight to the ears and fodder for the feet, Barabás’ mix of brassy jazz, electro-house and industrial beats was just what the doctor ordered to round-off the working week. A master of all he touches, his tools on the evening included the trumpet, keyboard/synthesiser, DJ mixing machines, sound-effect foot pedals and computer software. Single-handedly building industrial rhythms around the trumpet – his key instrument – accompanied by his other tools was more evidence of this artist’s ability to rise to a challenge. – Ceel.org.uk

Artist: Barabás Lőrinc Eklektrik
Album: Ladal
Year: 2007
Label: Not On Label
Runtime: 56:37

Tracks:
1.  Noxville 5:15 
2.  Famous 4:15 
3.  Otto 5:47 
4.  Csak 4:29 
5.  Lomha 4:08 
6.  Coolhouse 3:07 
7.  Sunset 4:10 
8.  Ezazz 4:22 
9.  Ujdnb 4:24 
10.  Ladal 5:30 
11.  Wanna 4:00 
12.  Leon (live) 7:10 
All music by Barabás Lőrinc 

Personnel:
Barabás Lõrinc (Trumpet)
Bata István (Bass)
Delov Jávor (Drums)
Premecz Mátyás (Keyboards)
Élő Márton (Performer [Mpc], Scratches, Trombone)
MC Kemon (Rap)
MC Sena (Rap, Vocals)
Fábián Julianna (Vocals) Source: http://ift.tt/2eRoURb

Barabás Lőrinc Eklektric – Ladal

A delight to the ears and fodder for the feet, Barabás’ mix of brassy jazz, electro-house and industrial beats was just what the doctor ordered to round-off the working week. A master of all he touches, his tools on the evening included the trumpet, keyboard/synthesiser, DJ mixing machines, sound-effect foot pedals and computer software. Single-handedly building industrial rhythms around the trumpet – his key instrument – accompanied by his other tools was more evidence of this artist’s ability to rise to a challenge. – Ceel.org.uk

Artist: Barabás Lőrinc Eklektrik
Album: Ladal
Year: 2007
Label: Not On Label
Runtime: 56:37

Tracks:
1.  Noxville 5:15 
2.  Famous 4:15 
3.  Otto 5:47 
4.  Csak 4:29 
5.  Lomha 4:08 
6.  Coolhouse 3:07 
7.  Sunset 4:10 
8.  Ezazz 4:22 
9.  Ujdnb 4:24 
10.  Ladal 5:30 
11.  Wanna 4:00 
12.  Leon (live) 7:10 
All music by Barabás Lőrinc 

Personnel:
Barabás Lõrinc (Trumpet)
Bata István (Bass)
Delov Jávor (Drums)
Premecz Mátyás (Keyboards)
Élő Márton (Performer [Mpc], Scratches, Trombone)
MC Kemon (Rap)
MC Sena (Rap, Vocals)
Fábián Julianna (Vocals) Source: http://ift.tt/2eRoURb