Ryohei Yanagihara (1931 – 2015)

At the start of his career, prolific artist and honorary MOL captain Ryohei Yanagihara illustrated numerous book covers and movie title sequences. He created the cultural icon, Uncle Torys, for Suntory whisky before becoming one of the key figures in Japanese independent animation of the 1960s.

Yanagihara was born in Tokyo, Japan, in 1931 and studied at the Tokyo Bijutsu Daigaku (Tokyo Art School). In 1954, right after graduating, Yanagihara joined Brewery Kotobukiya (later renamed Suntory). Assigned to the advertising department, he edited their magazine, Yoshu Tengoku (Spirits Heaven). It was a must-read for young, hip, salarymen who crowded into the popular Torys Bar to read the magazine and sip a glass of Torys Whisky. While at Kotobukiya, Yanagihara dabbled in audiovisual, producing TV commercials featuring Uncle Torys—a character that Yanagihara created. Uncle Torys popularity quickly outgrew his commercial origins to become one of the most widely recognised icons of the era.

In 1959, Yanagihara left Kotobukiya to begin a freelance career working closely with publishers and record labels. In 1960, he co-founded the production company Animation Sannin No Kai (Three People in Animation) with Youji Kuri and Hiroshi Manabe. They were handmaking experimental animated films heavily influenced by Miroslav Sasek, Paul Rand and Saul Bass. Yanagihara’s animations, like his illustrations, used stylised strokes and striking colours. They concentrated on the content and commentary over technical innovation. He continued making short films up until 1966. You can watch a playlist of some of Yanagihara’s animations on YouTube.

By 1965, Yanagihara had combined his love of ships with illustration. He worked for Japanese shipping companies Sado Steam Ship Co., Ltd., Taiheiyo Ferry Co, Ltd. and Tokai Kisen Co. Ltd. creating thousands of illustrations. Most notably Yanagihara worked closely with Mitsui OSK Lines, who made him an ‘Honorary Captain of MOL’ in 1969. Mitsui OSK Lines have a website, called the Ryohei Yanagihara Museum, which has a huge collection of his ship illustrations and some interesting biographical information. Yanagihara continued to dedicate his time to advertising, illustration and projects around his passion until his death in 2015.

You can see more of Ryohei Yanagihara’s work on his website, and read more about him here.

http://ift.tt/1DBQEwm

De La Mer

Designed by Gladstone Media, Toronto.

De La Mer Fish Market

De La Mer is a neighbourhood fish market in Toronto that aims to bring people the freshest and highest quality seafood from around the world. They offer a large selection of organic, naturally raised, sustainably caught and farmed, fresh seafood and fish options. With an emphasis on freshness and sustainability, their daily deliveries, rigorous quality control, and meticulous handling practices ensure the best product and highest standards of freshness and taste.

For this boutique seafood shop, we set out to create a classic yet modern identity to stand the test of time and feel like an established part of the community, while still conveying a current, streamlined sensibility.

Classic literary quotes are featured throughout the interior to serve as a touchstone to a past era. Custom vintage-style typography, hand-lettered cursive, etched wood, and eclectic found objects give the brand an organic, homegrown aesthetic that sets De La Mer apart from its competitors.

Behind the scenes

De La Mer Fish Market

De La Mer Fish Market

De La Mer Fish Market

De La Mer Fish Market

De La Mer Fish Market

De La Mer Fish Market

The finished interior design

De La Mer Fish Market

De La Mer Fish Market

De La Mer Fish Market

De La Mer Fish Market

De La Mer Fish Market

De La Mer Fish Market

De La Mer Fish Market

De La Mer Fish Market

Food styling and photography

De La Mer Fish Market

De La Mer Fish Market

De La Mer Fish Market

De La Mer Fish Market

De La Mer Fish Market

De La Mer Fish Market

De La Mer Fish Market

De La Mer Fish Market

De La Mer Fish Market

De La Mer Fish Market

De La Mer Fish Market

Website

De La Mer Fish Marketwww.delamer.ca

More identity work by Gladstone Media. Follow the studio on Twitter.

http://ift.tt/xyqKph

Art in the Light of Conscience: The Great Russian Poet Marina Tsvetaeva on Loving vs. Understanding and the Paradoxical Psychology of Our Resistance to Ideas

“Not to go onwards (in verse, as in everything) means to go backwards — that is, to leave the scene.”


Art in the Light of Conscience: The Great Russian Poet Marina Tsvetaeva on Loving vs. Understanding and the Paradoxical Psychology of Our Resistance to Ideas

“People have a hard time accepting anything that overwhelms them,” Bob Dylan observed in his 1991 conversation with journalist Paul Zollo about the unconscious mind and the creative process.

More than half a century earlier, the great Russian poet Marina Tsvetaeva (October 8, 1892–August 31, 1941) explored the paradoxical psychological machinery of that resistance in one of the eight beautiful pieces in her collection of essays on art and writing, Art in the Light of Conscience (public library) — a discovery embodying my longtime saying that literature is the original internet, for I found a “link” to the book in a footnote in Tsvetaeva’s exquisite correspondence with Pasternak and Rilke, which was in turn “linked” to in Marina Abramović moving memoir.

Marina Tsvetaeva
Marina Tsvetaeva

In a sentiment of equal cultural and political perceptiveness, Tsvetaeva writes:

Not to like a work is, in the first and most important place, not to recognize it: not to find the pre-cognized in it. The first cause of not accepting a work is not being prepared for it… A physical turning away of the head: I see nothing in this picture, therefore I don’t wish to look at it. — But, in order to see, one needs to look; in order to really see, one needs to look really closely. Disappointment of an eye that is used to seeing at first glance, which means used to seeing along its old track, that of others’ eyes… [an eye] used to not an act of cognition, but recognition.

Tsvetaeva considers the only position from which we have the right — intellectual, creative, moral — to reject an idea or a work of art:

The only case worthy of respect, the only legitimate non-acceptance of a work, is non-acceptance of it in full knowledge… No one is obliged to love, but every non-loving person is obliged to know — first, what it is he doesn’t love, and second, why he doesn’t love it.

In a fine complement to her compatriot Leo Tolstoy’s ideas about the paradoxical nature of love, she adds:

Anyone who loves only something, loves nothing.

Although our instinctual reaction to that which we do not understand is to reject it, Tsvetaeva reminds us that such rejection is maladaptive and to the detriment of our evolution — be it in art or in politics or in our private lives. She writes:

Not to go onwards (in verse, as in everything) means to go backwards — that is, to leave the scene.

What we reject most often is that which rebels against and challenges the status quo, but such rejection, Tsvetaeva admonishes, is antithetical to the creative force that propels us forward. Once again, what is true of poetry is true of life itself:

There is no poet who would reject any elemental force, consequently any rebellion.

[…]

What doesn’t accept (rejects, even ejects) is the human being: will, reason, conscience.

In this realm the poet can have only one prayer: not to understand the unacceptable — let me not understand, so that I may not be seduced. The sole prayer of the poet is not to hear the voices: let me not hear, so that I may not answer. For to hear, for the poet, is already to answer, and to answer is already to affirm, if only by the passionateness of his denial. The poet’s only prayer is a prayer for deafness.

Complement this particular fragment of Art in the Light of Conscience with Hannah Arendt on thinking vs. knowing and André Gide on art’s vital role as both acceptance of and rebellion against reality.


donating = loving

In 2016, bringing you (ad-free) Brain Pickings took me thousands of hours and tremendous resources. If you found any joy and stimulation here this year, please consider becoming a Supporting Member with a recurring monthly donation of your choosing, between a cup of tea and a good dinner.


newsletter

Brain Pickings has a free weekly newsletter. It comes out on Sundays and offers the week’s most unmissable reads. Here’s what to expect. Like? Sign up.

http://ift.tt/1LkXywO

Sky Villages Installation by James Paulius

James Paulius has created an interactive installation called Sky Villages at SPARK Brooklyn Children’s Museum. This project aims to invite children to build clusters of airborne villages on wall, encouraging their creativity skills and imaginative play. These villages are made of tessellating units, they are interlocking within each other in countless ways to create cool, unique structures. By playing Sky Villages, children are engaging with their problem solving skill, creativity, and 3 dimensional thinking.

The background story of this interactive play is that when Earth’s population increases, there’s a high possibility that we look into the atmosphere as inhabitable space. Sky Villages offers the possibility to live in the sky, in modular architecture that can be added and removed as population increases/decreases. Each unit is prefabricated with the intent of reuse rather than discardment. When a structure or building is no longer fit in the particular needs of its location, it can be removed elsewhere for a new family. These unique structures are constantly evolving. Each toy block is fabricated from Douglas-fir wood reclaimed from water towers in Manhattan, NY.

Designer : James Paulius
Photos by Ryan Jenq

Sky Villages by James Paulius

Sky Villages by James Paulius

Sky Villages by James Paulius

Sky Villages by James Paulius

Sky Villages by James Paulius

Sky Villages by James Paulius

Sky Villages by James Paulius

Sky Villages by James Paulius

Tuvie has received “Sky Villages” project from our ‘Submit A Design‘ feature, where we welcome our readers to submit their design/concept for publication.

Sky Villages Installation by James Paulius is originally posted on Tuvie – Modern Industrial Design

http://www.tuvie.com

Maxfind Electronic Skateboard with Wireless Remote Control to Control the Speed

Cruising down the street in style effortlessly with Maxfind Electronic Skateboard. It looks like any regular skateboard but beneath the board, there are two powerful 360W motors to motorize this longboard to reach to your destination faster and easier.

Maxfind Electronic Skateboard comes with a wireless hand-held remote control so that you can set the speed simply by accelerating and decelerating with the touch of a finger. It’s a fun motorized skateboard for young adults, perfect for both beginners and advanced riders. This skateboard can reach a maximum speed of 28km/h, pretty fast for a skateboard right? Even when you lack of skateboarding skill, no problem, you can still drive it like a pro.

From : ChinaVasion [Buy It Here]

Maxfind Electronic Skateboard with Wireless Remote Control

Maxfind Electronic Skateboard with Wireless Remote Control

Powered by 22000mAh Samsung 18650 Lithium battery, you can ride this board up to 16km range before running out of power. If you choose to use it like a regular, non-powered skateboard, you can still do that. However, those little motors are always ready to give you an extra push when you need it. This skateboard is made from high quality wood and finished with super grippy, anti-slip layer.

Maxfind Electronic Skateboard with Wireless Remote Control

Maxfind Electronic Skateboard with Wireless Remote Control

Maxfind Electronic Skateboard with Wireless Remote Control

Maxfind Electronic Skateboard with Wireless Remote Control

Maxfind Electronic Skateboard with Wireless Remote Control

Maxfind Electronic Skateboard with Wireless Remote Control to Control the Speed is originally posted on Tuvie – Modern Industrial Design

http://www.tuvie.com

Freedrum : Portable Drumkit That Fits in Your Pocket for Drummers of Any Skill Level

Practice your drumming skill anytime, anywhere with Freedrum. Just like its name suggests, it’s a portable drumkit that fits inside your bag or even your jeans back pocket. Take your drumming experience to outdoors, friend’s house, bedroom, or sofa, just any place where you can your smartphone. Freedrum offers you with a virtual drumkit, it is designed to provide you with an immersive experience for drummers of any skill level.

How it works?
Simply slip the sensors on your drumsticks, pair them with your smartphone via Bluetooth technology. It doesn’t even need an internet connection, the battery allows you to keep drumming for a week of regular use. Just in case you want a full experience, you can also slip two more units onto your feet. Cool thing is, all units are interchangeable, no need to purchase special feet units.

Designer : Freedrum

Freedrum : Portable Drumkit That Fits in Your Pocket

Freedrum : Portable Drumkit That Fits in Your Pocket

Freedrum : Portable Drumkit That Fits in Your Pocket

Freedrum : Portable Drumkit That Fits in Your Pocket

Freedrum : Portable Drumkit That Fits in Your Pocket

Freedrum : Portable Drumkit That Fits in Your Pocket

Freedrum : Portable Drumkit That Fits in Your Pocket for Drummers of Any Skill Level is originally posted on Tuvie – Modern Industrial Design

http://www.tuvie.com

How to Suppress the Urge to Kill

I don’t actually admire Emperor Palpatine. He was just the first example I could think of of someone easily recognizable who was famous for urging others to kill.

Anyway, to counterbalance the unwholesome message of the third panel, I offer you this, the wisest thing Captain Kirk ever said about human nature.

Note from Missy: Huh! I thought for sure this speech was given to the dudes who had faces painted half-white and half-black, who were racist against the dudes who also had half-white and half-black faces, but the white and black sides were flipped. Some Trekkie I am.

 

As always, thanks for using my Amazon Affiliate links (USUKCanada).

http://ift.tt/1nfc6j4

Make a mobile play table

Make a mobile play table

Parts list

  • 2 x IKEA Trofast
  • 1 x IKEA Patrull
  • 2 x MDF panel 100 x 100 x 18
  • 750ml White gloss paint
  • 750ml Orange gloss paint
  • 4 x roller wheels
  • Various screws

Steps

  • Assemble the Trofast units and give them 3 layers of white paint (white)
  • Paint the MDF panels with 3 layers of paint (orange)
  • Mount the roller wheels on the base plate
  • Mount the Trofast units on the base plate
  • Mount the top plate
  • Put the corners protectors on
  • Put some toys in the boxes and invite the kids ;-)

Make a mobile play table

The post Make a mobile play table appeared first on IKEA Hackers.

http://ift.tt/oBHoI7