Holy Tunics: December 11, 2016 Sunnyvale

One of the sleeper singles early in this year was the oddly titled “Clutching the Straw Map to Your Heart” (Seagreen Records) from the mysterious quartet Holy Tunics. This three-minute nugget came from a band who didn’t spend much time promoting themselves and about whom there wasn’t much information on the web. Whether the mystery was intentional or not, the song perked up ears at places like Impose Magazine, Cereal + Sounds and Breakthrough Radio.

This December saw the release of Holy Tunics’ first EP Hot To Trot, which contains “Straw Map” but also five other new songs and frankly its one of the best collections of music I’ve heard all year. The band celebrated the release with a headlining show at Sunnyvale last weekend and revealed another mystery — that the personnel listed on the Bandcamp page for the EP isn’t necessarily the live band. Nick Rogers is front and center and Matt Billington is the bass player, but for this night Ana Asnes Becker from Fruit & Flowers played lead guitar and Brian Alvarez played percussion. The set consisted of four of the six tracks from the EP and what appears to five new songs that we are guessing are targeted towards the band’s first full length. This Holy Tunics set was bubbling with energy and was buoyed by the serious quality of the songcraft. We expect big things from this band, and we will certainly see more of them on these pages.

Holy Tunics perform again at Shea Stadium on January 14, as support for a reunion gig of our old friend Shark?.

I recorded this set with the Schoeps at the stage lip and mixed with a fine board feed from house FOH Tim. The sound quality is quite excellent. Enjoy!

Download the Complete Show [MP3] / [FLAC]

Stream the Complete Show:

Holy Tunics
2016-12-11
Sunnyvale
Brooklyn NY

Digital Master Recording
Soundboard + On-Stage Audience Matrix

Soundboard [Engineer Tim] + Schoeps CCM4u’s > Sound Devices 744t > 2 x 24bit 48kHz wav files > Soundforge (post production) > CDWave 1.95 (tracking) > TLH > flac (320 MP3 and tagging via Foobar)

Please support this excellent band:
http://ift.tt/2iowx3p

Recorded and Produced
by nyctaper

Setlist:
[Total Time 34:04]
01 Forget Your Love
02 Hot to Trot
03 Tell Me True
04 Poets Laugh
05 Clutching the Straw Map to Your Heart
06 Fabric
07 Limelights
08 Happy Sunday
09 Notes from Captivity

Support Holy Tunics: Bandcamp | Facebook | Seagreen Records

http://www.nyctaper.com

Annie Dillard on the Winter Solstice and How the Snowy Season Anneals Us to Life

“Spend the afternoon. You can’t take it with you.”


Annie Dillard on the Winter Solstice and How the Snowy Season Anneals Us to Life

Rilke considered the cold season the time for tending one’s inner garden. “In the depths of winter, I finally learned that within me there lay an invincible summer,” Albert Camus wrote a generation later. “If we didn’t remember winter in spring, it wouldn’t be as lovely,” Adam Gopnik observed after many more revolutions of the Earth around the Sun in his lyrical love letter to winter. But if we are to reap winter’s quiet and invisible spiritual rewards, it seems that special regard must be paid to day of the season’s onset as the time to set such interior intentions.

That’s what Annie Dillard (b. April 30, 1945) invites in a splendid meditation on the winter solstice, originally published in her 1974 masterpiece Pilgrim at Tinker Creek — which I revisit frequently as a sort of secular scripture — and later included in The Abundance: Narrative Essays Old and New (public library), one of the 16 finest books of 2016.

anniedillard

Dillard writes:

Today is the winter solstice. The planet tilts just so to its star, lists and holds circling in a fixed tension between veering and longing, spins helpless, exalted, in and out of that fleet blazing touch. Last night Orion vaulted and spread all over the sky, pagan and lunatic, his shoulder and knee on fire, his sword three suns at the ready — for what?

[…]

I stood at the window, the bay window on which in summer a waxy-looking grasshopper had breathed puff puff, and thought, I won’t see this year again, not again so innocent, and longing wrapped round my throat like a scarf… Is this mystery or coyness? A cast-iron bell hung from the arch of my rib cage; when I stirred it rang, or it tolled, a long syllable pulsing ripples up my lungs and down the gritty sap inside my bones, and I couldn’t make it out; I felt the voiced vowel like a sigh or a note, but couldn’t catch the consonant that might shape it into sense. I wrenched myself from the window and stepped outside.

Art by Isabelle Arsenault from Once Upon a Northern Night by Jean E. Pendziwol

She considers how winter highlights one of the central perplexities of existence — the mystery of beauty. In a sentiment that calls to mind Baudelaire’s assertion that “beauty always has an element of strangeness,” Dillard contemplates winter’s strange and sorrowful landscape of loss, and writes:

Is beauty itself an intricately fashioned lure, the cruelest hoax of all?

[…]

A wind rose, quickening; it invaded my nostrils, vibrated my gut. I stirred and lifted my head. No, I’ve gone through this a million times, beauty is not a hoax… Beauty is real. I would never deny it; the appalling thing is that I forget it.

Art by Carson Ellis from Du Iz Tak?, a lyrical illustrated story about the cycle of life and the eternal cycle of growth and decay

Watching a maple leaf twirl to the ground in its final flight, Dillard considers something else we easily forget, as essential as beauty — the irrepressible cycle of growth and decay, life and death, each rendering the other both necessary and inevitable:

Another year has twined away, unrolled and dropped across nowhere like a flung banner painted in gibberish. “The last act is bloody,” said Pascal, “however brave be all the rest of the play; at the end they throw a little earth upon your head, and it’s all over forever.” Somewhere, everywhere, there is a gap…

[…]

The gaps are the spirit’s one home, the altitudes and latitudes so dazzlingly spare and clean that the spirit can discover itself for the first time like a once-blind man unbound. The gaps … are the fissures between mountains and cells the wind lances through, the icy narrowing fjords splitting the cliffs of mystery.

Go up into the gaps. If you can find them; they shift and vanish too. Stalk the gaps. Squeak into a gap in the solid, turn, and unlock — more than a maple — a universe. This is how you spend this afternoon, and tomorrow morning, and tomorrow afternoon. Spend the afternoon. You can’t take it with you.

Art Alessandro Sanna from The River, a watercolor ode to the seasonality of being human

In a passage that calls to mind Simone Weil’s beautiful notion of “the needs of the soul,” Dillard arrives at the ultimate existential gift that winter gives us when we make ourselves willing to receive it:

There is not a guarantee in the world. Oh your needs are guaranteed; your needs are absolutely guaranteed by the most stringent of warranties, in the plainest, truest words: knock; seek; ask. But you must read the fine print. “Not as the world giveth, give I unto you.” That’s the catch. If you can catch it it will catch you up, aloft, up to any gap at all, and you’ll come back, for you always come back, transformed in a way you may not have bargained for… Did you think, before you were caught, that you needed, say, life? Did you think you would keep your life, or anything else you love? … You see the needs of your own spirit met whenever you have asked, and you have learned that the outrageous guarantee holds. You see creatures die, and you know you will die. And one day it occurs to you that you must not need life. Obviously. And then you’re gone…

I think that the dying pray at the last not “please,” but “thank you,” as a guest thanks his host at the door… The universe was not made in jest but in solemn, incomprehensible earnest. By a power that is unfathomably secret, and holy, and fleet. There is nothing to be done about it, but ignore it, or see. And then you walk fearlessly, eating what you must, growing wherever you can, like the monk on the road who knows precisely how vulnerable he is, who takes no comfort among death-forgetting men, and who carries his vision of vastness and might around in his tunic like a live coal which neither burns nor warms him, but with which he will not part.

The Abundance is a bountifully rewarding read in its totality. Devour more of its richness with Dillard on what it takes to be a writer, then revisit Henry Beston on solstice, seasonality, and the human spirit and Dillard’s abiding wisdom on the two ways of seeing, choosing presence over productivity, and how to reclaim our capacity for joy and wonder.


donating = loving

In 2016, bringing you (ad-free) Brain Pickings took me thousands of hours and tremendous resources. If you found any joy and stimulation here this year, please consider becoming a Supporting Member with a recurring monthly donation of your choosing, between a cup of tea and a good dinner.


newsletter

Brain Pickings has a free weekly newsletter. It comes out on Sundays and offers the week’s most unmissable reads. Here’s what to expect. Like? Sign up.

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Luminoodle Plus : LED Rope Lights for Your Outdoor Activities

Luminoodle Plus is your flexible all-in-one lighting solution. It’s a set of LED rope lights that you can take with you when you are biking, camping, or doing handy work outdoors, it offers bright, spread out light of your surrounds, it’s pretty cool. These LED lights are flexible, waterproof, and can be powered with its included battery pack, Lithium 4400.

This light set comes with universal ties, utility loop, embedded magnets, and a lantern bag. It is available in 5ft and 10ft models, choose the one that suits you best. You can simply hang, stick, strap, or hook it to light up your night, the lantern bag comes in handy when you just want to create a lantern. Due to its flexibility, you can have number of ways to use Luminoodle from patio lighting to garage projects.

From : PowerPractical [Buy It Here]

Luminoodle Plus : LED Rope Lights for Your Outdoor Activities

Luminoodle Plus : LED Rope Lights for Your Outdoor Activities

Luminoodle Plus : LED Rope Lights for Your Outdoor Activities

Luminoodle Plus : LED Rope Lights for Your Outdoor Activities

Luminoodle Plus : LED Rope Lights for Your Outdoor Activities

More images of Luminoodle Plus Rope Lights:
Luminoodle Plus : LED Rope Lights for Your Outdoor ActivitiesLuminoodle Plus : LED Rope Lights for Your Outdoor ActivitiesLuminoodle Plus : LED Rope Lights for Your Outdoor Activities

Luminoodle Plus : LED Rope Lights for Your Outdoor Activities is originally posted on Tuvie – Modern Industrial Design

http://www.tuvie.com

Helixot XO 6.2 Backpack – Waterproof and Fully Submersible Backpack

Helixot XO 6.2 Backpack is not only waterproof, it is also fully submersible, keeping your items safe and dry whatever you’re doing. You can take your phone, camera, wallet while doing watersport and can be sure that they won’t get wet. Enjoy outdoor activities and adventures regardless the weather, the unique and clever design of this backpack makes it easy to use and fully submersible.

This hybrid backpack features a coated fabric that is completely waterproof, perfect for nautical activities and it is very durable. There’s a screw cap closing mechanism and welded seams to ensure airtight protection.

From : Helixot

XO 6.2 Fully Submersible Backpack

XO 6.2 Fully Submersible Backpack

XO 6.2 Fully Submersible Backpack

XO 6.2 Fully Submersible Backpack

XO 6.2 Fully Submersible Backpack

Helixot XO 6.2 Backpack – Waterproof and Fully Submersible Backpack is originally posted on Tuvie – Modern Industrial Design

http://www.tuvie.com

Annie Dillard on the Winter Solstice and How the Snowy Season Anneals Us to Life

“Spend the afternoon. You can’t take it with you.”


Annie Dillard on the Winter Solstice and How the Snowy Season Anneals Us to Life

Rilke considered the cold season the time for tending one’s inner garden. “In the depths of winter, I finally learned that within me there lay an invincible summer,” Albert Camus wrote a generation later. “If we didn’t remember winter in spring, it wouldn’t be as lovely,” Adam Gopnik observed after many more revolutions of the Earth around the Sun in his lyrical love letter to winter. But if we are to reap winter’s quiet and invisible spiritual rewards, it seems that special regard must be paid to day of the season’s onset as the time to set such interior intentions.

That’s what Annie Dillard (b. April 30, 1945) invites in a splendid meditation on the winter solstice, originally published in her 1974 masterpiece Pilgrim at Tinker Creek — which I revisit frequently as a sort of secular scripture — and later included in The Abundance: Narrative Essays Old and New (public library), one of the 16 finest books of 2016.

anniedillard

Dillard writes:

Today is the winter solstice. The planet tilts just so to its star, lists and holds circling in a fixed tension between veering and longing, spins helpless, exalted, in and out of that fleet blazing touch. Last night Orion vaulted and spread all over the sky, pagan and lunatic, his shoulder and knee on fire, his sword three suns at the ready — for what?

[…]

I stood at the window, the bay window on which in summer a waxy-looking grasshopper had breathed puff puff, and thought, I won’t see this year again, not again so innocent, and longing wrapped round my throat like a scarf… Is this mystery or coyness? A cast-iron bell hung from the arch of my rib cage; when I stirred it rang, or it tolled, a long syllable pulsing ripples up my lungs and down the gritty sap inside my bones, and I couldn’t make it out; I felt the voiced vowel like a sigh or a note, but couldn’t catch the consonant that might shape it into sense. I wrenched myself from the window and stepped outside.

Art by Isabelle Arsenault from Once Upon a Northern Night by Jean E. Pendziwol

She considers how winter highlights one of the central perplexities of existence — the mystery of beauty. In a sentiment that calls to mind Baudelaire’s assertion that “beauty always has an element of strangeness,” Dillard contemplates winter’s strange and sorrowful landscape of loss, and writes:

Is beauty itself an intricately fashioned lure, the cruelest hoax of all?

[…]

A wind rose, quickening; it invaded my nostrils, vibrated my gut. I stirred and lifted my head. No, I’ve gone through this a million times, beauty is not a hoax… Beauty is real. I would never deny it; the appalling thing is that I forget it.

Art by Carson Ellis from Du Iz Tak?, a lyrical illustrated story about the cycle of life and the eternal cycle of growth and decay

Watching a maple leaf twirl to the ground in its final flight, Dillard considers something else we easily forget, as essential as beauty — the irrepressible cycle of growth and decay, life and death, each rendering the other both necessary and inevitable:

Another year has twined away, unrolled and dropped across nowhere like a flung banner painted in gibberish. “The last act is bloody,” said Pascal, “however brave be all the rest of the play; at the end they throw a little earth upon your head, and it’s all over forever.” Somewhere, everywhere, there is a gap…

[…]

The gaps are the spirit’s one home, the altitudes and latitudes so dazzlingly spare and clean that the spirit can discover itself for the first time like a once-blind man unbound. The gaps … are the fissures between mountains and cells the wind lances through, the icy narrowing fjords splitting the cliffs of mystery.

Go up into the gaps. If you can find them; they shift and vanish too. Stalk the gaps. Squeak into a gap in the solid, turn, and unlock — more than a maple — a universe. This is how you spend this afternoon, and tomorrow morning, and tomorrow afternoon. Spend the afternoon. You can’t take it with you.

Art Alessandro Sanna from The River, a watercolor ode to the seasonality of being human

In a passage that calls to mind Simone Weil’s beautiful notion of “the needs of the soul,” Dillard arrives at the ultimate existential gift that winter gives us when we make ourselves willing to receive it:

There is not a guarantee in the world. Oh your needs are guaranteed; your needs are absolutely guaranteed by the most stringent of warranties, in the plainest, truest words: knock; seek; ask. But you must read the fine print. “Not as the world giveth, give I unto you.” That’s the catch. If you can catch it it will catch you up, aloft, up to any gap at all, and you’ll come back, for you always come back, transformed in a way you may not have bargained for… Did you think, before you were caught, that you needed, say, life? Did you think you would keep your life, or anything else you love? … You see the needs of your own spirit met whenever you have asked, and you have learned that the outrageous guarantee holds. You see creatures die, and you know you will die. And one day it occurs to you that you must not need life. Obviously. And then you’re gone…

I think that the dying pray at the last not “please,” but “thank you,” as a guest thanks his host at the door… The universe was not made in jest but in solemn, incomprehensible earnest. By a power that is unfathomably secret, and holy, and fleet. There is nothing to be done about it, but ignore it, or see. And then you walk fearlessly, eating what you must, growing wherever you can, like the monk on the road who knows precisely how vulnerable he is, who takes no comfort among death-forgetting men, and who carries his vision of vastness and might around in his tunic like a live coal which neither burns nor warms him, but with which he will not part.

The Abundance is a bountifully rewarding read in its totality. Devour more of its richness with Dillard on what it takes to be a writer, then revisit Henry Beston on solstice, seasonality, and the human spirit and Dillard’s abiding wisdom on the two ways of seeing, choosing presence over productivity, and how to reclaim our capacity for joy and wonder.


donating = loving

In 2016, bringing you (ad-free) Brain Pickings took me thousands of hours and tremendous resources. If you found any joy and stimulation here this year, please consider becoming a Supporting Member with a recurring monthly donation of your choosing, between a cup of tea and a good dinner.


newsletter

Brain Pickings has a free weekly newsletter. It comes out on Sundays and offers the week’s most unmissable reads. Here’s what to expect. Like? Sign up.

http://ift.tt/1LkXywO