Magazine of the year: Victory Journal

Victory Journal is unapologetically big. It towers over the other magazines on the newsstand. Yet with its focus on the “intersection between sports and culture”, it is about much more than sporting prowess, size or strength. Through large-format photography and text, Victory examines sport’s peripheries as much as its participants – and it does so with an impressive, immersive ease.

North American Ring Association decoy as featured on the issue’s cover, photographed by Jared Ryder

While the culture of sport anchors the magazine’s contents, it is hugely varied in scope. Issue 13, for example, includes photo stories on subjects as diverse as Bhutanese archery, US championship checkers and French Ring, a late 19th-century dog sport that came to the US in the 1980s. There are features on men’s gymnastics and women’s ice hockey, a look at Serie B’s Venezia FC, before the issue concludes with some of Ray Wright’s 1970s portraits of English football players in their homes. Sport has long been fertile territory for photographers, as competition and drama naturally make for compelling imagery, but Victory and its contributors avoid cliché.

National Collegiate Athletic Association gymnasts in pre-season training

An early influence on the direction of the magazine came from Founder and Editor Chris Isenberg’s first encounter with Taschen’s supersized Greatest of All Time book on boxing legend Muhammad Ali. “As someone who is obsessed with Ali, it was just exciting that they were making an object that was for people who loved [him], but was elevated and rarefied,” says Isenberg. “It was a very different endeavour than a Time magazine special issue or USA Today supplement. It was comprehensive in terms of his life, it was impeccably curated in terms of the photography and the writing they used, and it treated objects and ephemera with equal importance which felt novel. [I’m] not saying I love every design choice they made in hindsight, or fully endorse the idea of a $3,000 book – but it was a project that wasn’t out to match a standard, it was out to achieve a standard set by its own internal compass. That was and is extremely inspiring.”

Opening spread to Sarah Gearhart’s story on fixed-gear racing, which features images by Nils Ericson

Turning the pages of Victory’s latest issue and the influence of this total approach to covering the world of sport is clear. Creative Director Aaron Amaro also cites a wealth of classic magazines from the 1970s – Interview, Rolling Stone, Avant Garde and Eros – as having helped shaped Victory’s visual direction. There’s something about the boldness of the imagery and the sheer size of the thing as an object that also chimes with this period of time when print was king.

Cover of Victory Journal 12 featuring an image by Antonio Santos

“We always knew we wanted something larger, something that had the gravitas to live on not just as a piece of printed ephemera, but as a historical object,” says Amaro. “When we started Victory it began as a humble 16-page saddle-stitched broadsheet. Later we decided to go perfect bound as the page count increased [and] with that change we lost a bit of image in the gutter…. I think the artistry and design is at the forefront – our contributors really appreciate the large size and the dedication to the most powerful viewing experience,” he continues.

A part of Victory’s appeal as a magazine is the way its contributors document different aspects of sports, an approach that has been followed since the early issues. For Isenberg, this course has been about “really looking around and observing what may not be central to the action, but frames it or ties back into it,” he says. “Great sports writing does that. And great sports photography does it too. We wouldn’t have said at the beginning that we were trying to pursue that necessarily, but the taste for it is an important guide.”

Sport has long been fertile territory for photographers, as competition naturally makes for compelling  imagery, but Victory and its contributors avoid cliché

The design of each edition relies on a distinction between the text (longer essays are usually set over one or more pages) and the images, which tend to run as uninterrupted series, each picture at full-bleed, with brief captions. “This is my preferred way to digest information,” says Amaro of this rationale. “Separate the reading from the viewing. They use different parts of the brain. You read a piece then you take your time with the art. I find it a better way to mentally digest an idea. I kind of hate pull quotes, I think it forces a different hierarchy to the narrative.”

Opening spreads to Kenny Hurtado’s photo series on ‘open-water’ swimming (issue 12)

Online, Victory neatly transfers its approach to narrative and aesthetics to the digital sphere – its underlying values apply across the board, says Isenberg, “whether that’s print, online, film, Instagram, podcast, or event”. Take the film Kite Fight that Victory made in Brazil. “It was something where still photography really just didn’t capture the interest of kite-fighting – and we tried,” Isenberg recalls. “And with the film you can see and hear the place and meet the people, in a very different way to a written story, but the DNA is still Victory. It’s also awesome to collaborate with contributors who work exclusively in moving image, or who cross over between stills and video. And when you have something strong here, it can be seen by hundreds of thousands or millions of people.”

Opening spread to Alejandra Carles-Tolra’s photo story on Brown University’s women’s rugby team from Victory Journal 12

Isenberg adds that since Victory has been working with contributing editor Nathaniel Friedman, he has been pushing the title to be more prolific online. While some online stories will be covered in the magazine as well, he explains, “others are topical in a way that wouldn’t make sense for the book, but still feel animated by the same fundamental guidelines. And it’s very interesting to see Victory engage with the present in that way, it wasn’t something we were all that comfortable doing when we set out, but it’s exciting to see it happen in way that feels true to us.”

Visiting supporters from Calcio Padova S.p.A photographed by Alessandro Simonetti for Peter Macia’s Victory Journal 13 feature on Venezia FC

While the approaches to Victory’s photo stories are in one sense determined by the individual photographers, for Isenberg it’s what Amaro, Photo Editor Shane Lyons and the team then do with the material that brings the range of sports and disciplines into a single, unified volume. “They spend a lot of time getting the individual stories and the overall book right, with everyone chiming in a bit,” he says. “There’s a flow we’re trying to get to which has to do both with the variety and not repeating beats and that kind of looking directly at the action and then looking away from it. It’s become a much gnarlier challenge both to get the right material and to order it as the book’s gotten thicker, but rising to that and getting an issue to where it feels strong in that way is a huge driver for all of us.”


Banner image: Trainer Michael Lorraine and his Malinois dog practice targeting during the North American Ring Association’s Western Regional Trial. The image forms part of Noah Davis’s essay on the sport of French Ring, which features photographs by Jared Ryder. French Ring is a so-called ‘protection’ sport which tests a dog’s ability to protect itself and its handler

Victory Journal is published biannually ($16). Issue 13, Tooth & Nail, is out now

victoryjournal.com, @victoryjournal

The post Magazine of the year: Victory Journal appeared first on Creative Review.

Source: http://ift.tt/1KjyLUn

Magazine of the year: Victory Journal

Victory Journal is unapologetically big. It towers over the other magazines on the newsstand. Yet with its focus on the “intersection between sports and culture”, it is about much more than sporting prowess, size or strength. Through large-format photography and text, Victory examines sport’s peripheries as much as its participants – and it does so with an impressive, immersive ease.

North American Ring Association decoy as featured on the issue’s cover, photographed by Jared Ryder

While the culture of sport anchors the magazine’s contents, it is hugely varied in scope. Issue 13, for example, includes photo stories on subjects as diverse as Bhutanese archery, US championship checkers and French Ring, a late 19th-century dog sport that came to the US in the 1980s. There are features on men’s gymnastics and women’s ice hockey, a look at Serie B’s Venezia FC, before the issue concludes with some of Ray Wright’s 1970s portraits of English football players in their homes. Sport has long been fertile territory for photographers, as competition and drama naturally make for compelling imagery, but Victory and its contributors avoid cliché.

National Collegiate Athletic Association gymnasts in pre-season training

An early influence on the direction of the magazine came from Founder and Editor Chris Isenberg’s first encounter with Taschen’s supersized Greatest of All Time book on boxing legend Muhammad Ali. “As someone who is obsessed with Ali, it was just exciting that they were making an object that was for people who loved [him], but was elevated and rarefied,” says Isenberg. “It was a very different endeavour than a Time magazine special issue or USA Today supplement. It was comprehensive in terms of his life, it was impeccably curated in terms of the photography and the writing they used, and it treated objects and ephemera with equal importance which felt novel. [I’m] not saying I love every design choice they made in hindsight, or fully endorse the idea of a $3,000 book – but it was a project that wasn’t out to match a standard, it was out to achieve a standard set by its own internal compass. That was and is extremely inspiring.”

Opening spread to Sarah Gearhart’s story on fixed-gear racing, which features images by Nils Ericson

Turning the pages of Victory’s latest issue and the influence of this total approach to covering the world of sport is clear. Creative Director Aaron Amaro also cites a wealth of classic magazines from the 1970s – Interview, Rolling Stone, Avant Garde and Eros – as having helped shaped Victory’s visual direction. There’s something about the boldness of the imagery and the sheer size of the thing as an object that also chimes with this period of time when print was king.

Cover of Victory Journal 12 featuring an image by Antonio Santos

“We always knew we wanted something larger, something that had the gravitas to live on not just as a piece of printed ephemera, but as a historical object,” says Amaro. “When we started Victory it began as a humble 16-page saddle-stitched broadsheet. Later we decided to go perfect bound as the page count increased [and] with that change we lost a bit of image in the gutter…. I think the artistry and design is at the forefront – our contributors really appreciate the large size and the dedication to the most powerful viewing experience,” he continues.

A part of Victory’s appeal as a magazine is the way its contributors document different aspects of sports, an approach that has been followed since the early issues. For Isenberg, this course has been about “really looking around and observing what may not be central to the action, but frames it or ties back into it,” he says. “Great sports writing does that. And great sports photography does it too. We wouldn’t have said at the beginning that we were trying to pursue that necessarily, but the taste for it is an important guide.”

Sport has long been fertile territory for photographers, as competition naturally makes for compelling  imagery, but Victory and its contributors avoid cliché

The design of each edition relies on a distinction between the text (longer essays are usually set over one or more pages) and the images, which tend to run as uninterrupted series, each picture at full-bleed, with brief captions. “This is my preferred way to digest information,” says Amaro of this rationale. “Separate the reading from the viewing. They use different parts of the brain. You read a piece then you take your time with the art. I find it a better way to mentally digest an idea. I kind of hate pull quotes, I think it forces a different hierarchy to the narrative.”

Opening spreads to Kenny Hurtado’s photo series on ‘open-water’ swimming (issue 12)

Online, Victory neatly transfers its approach to narrative and aesthetics to the digital sphere – its underlying values apply across the board, says Isenberg, “whether that’s print, online, film, Instagram, podcast, or event”. Take the film Kite Fight that Victory made in Brazil. “It was something where still photography really just didn’t capture the interest of kite-fighting – and we tried,” Isenberg recalls. “And with the film you can see and hear the place and meet the people, in a very different way to a written story, but the DNA is still Victory. It’s also awesome to collaborate with contributors who work exclusively in moving image, or who cross over between stills and video. And when you have something strong here, it can be seen by hundreds of thousands or millions of people.”

Opening spread to Alejandra Carles-Tolra’s photo story on Brown University’s women’s rugby team from Victory Journal 12

Isenberg adds that since Victory has been working with contributing editor Nathaniel Friedman, he has been pushing the title to be more prolific online. While some online stories will be covered in the magazine as well, he explains, “others are topical in a way that wouldn’t make sense for the book, but still feel animated by the same fundamental guidelines. And it’s very interesting to see Victory engage with the present in that way, it wasn’t something we were all that comfortable doing when we set out, but it’s exciting to see it happen in way that feels true to us.”

Visiting supporters from Calcio Padova S.p.A photographed by Alessandro Simonetti for Peter Macia’s Victory Journal 13 feature on Venezia FC

While the approaches to Victory’s photo stories are in one sense determined by the individual photographers, for Isenberg it’s what Amaro, Photo Editor Shane Lyons and the team then do with the material that brings the range of sports and disciplines into a single, unified volume. “They spend a lot of time getting the individual stories and the overall book right, with everyone chiming in a bit,” he says. “There’s a flow we’re trying to get to which has to do both with the variety and not repeating beats and that kind of looking directly at the action and then looking away from it. It’s become a much gnarlier challenge both to get the right material and to order it as the book’s gotten thicker, but rising to that and getting an issue to where it feels strong in that way is a huge driver for all of us.”


Banner image: Trainer Michael Lorraine and his Malinois dog practice targeting during the North American Ring Association’s Western Regional Trial. The image forms part of Noah Davis’s essay on the sport of French Ring, which features photographs by Jared Ryder. French Ring is a so-called ‘protection’ sport which tests a dog’s ability to protect itself and its handler

Victory Journal is published biannually ($16). Issue 13, Tooth & Nail, is out now

victoryjournal.com, @victoryjournal

The post Magazine of the year: Victory Journal appeared first on Creative Review.

Source: http://ift.tt/1KjyLUn

Magazine of the year: Victory Journal

Victory Journal is unapologetically big. It towers over the other magazines on the newsstand. Yet with its focus on the “intersection between sports and culture”, it is about much more than sporting prowess, size or strength. Through large-format photography and text, Victory examines sport’s peripheries as much as its participants – and it does so with an impressive, immersive ease.

North American Ring Association decoy as featured on the issue’s cover, photographed by Jared Ryder

While the culture of sport anchors the magazine’s contents, it is hugely varied in scope. Issue 13, for example, includes photo stories on subjects as diverse as Bhutanese archery, US championship checkers and French Ring, a late 19th-century dog sport that came to the US in the 1980s. There are features on men’s gymnastics and women’s ice hockey, a look at Serie B’s Venezia FC, before the issue concludes with some of Ray Wright’s 1970s portraits of English football players in their homes. Sport has long been fertile territory for photographers, as competition and drama naturally make for compelling imagery, but Victory and its contributors avoid cliché.

National Collegiate Athletic Association gymnasts in pre-season training

An early influence on the direction of the magazine came from Founder and Editor Chris Isenberg’s first encounter with Taschen’s supersized Greatest of All Time book on boxing legend Muhammad Ali. “As someone who is obsessed with Ali, it was just exciting that they were making an object that was for people who loved [him], but was elevated and rarefied,” says Isenberg. “It was a very different endeavour than a Time magazine special issue or USA Today supplement. It was comprehensive in terms of his life, it was impeccably curated in terms of the photography and the writing they used, and it treated objects and ephemera with equal importance which felt novel. [I’m] not saying I love every design choice they made in hindsight, or fully endorse the idea of a $3,000 book – but it was a project that wasn’t out to match a standard, it was out to achieve a standard set by its own internal compass. That was and is extremely inspiring.”

Opening spread to Sarah Gearhart’s story on fixed-gear racing, which features images by Nils Ericson

Turning the pages of Victory’s latest issue and the influence of this total approach to covering the world of sport is clear. Creative Director Aaron Amaro also cites a wealth of classic magazines from the 1970s – Interview, Rolling Stone, Avant Garde and Eros – as having helped shaped Victory’s visual direction. There’s something about the boldness of the imagery and the sheer size of the thing as an object that also chimes with this period of time when print was king.

Cover of Victory Journal 12 featuring an image by Antonio Santos

“We always knew we wanted something larger, something that had the gravitas to live on not just as a piece of printed ephemera, but as a historical object,” says Amaro. “When we started Victory it began as a humble 16-page saddle-stitched broadsheet. Later we decided to go perfect bound as the page count increased [and] with that change we lost a bit of image in the gutter…. I think the artistry and design is at the forefront – our contributors really appreciate the large size and the dedication to the most powerful viewing experience,” he continues.

A part of Victory’s appeal as a magazine is the way its contributors document different aspects of sports, an approach that has been followed since the early issues. For Isenberg, this course has been about “really looking around and observing what may not be central to the action, but frames it or ties back into it,” he says. “Great sports writing does that. And great sports photography does it too. We wouldn’t have said at the beginning that we were trying to pursue that necessarily, but the taste for it is an important guide.”

Sport has long been fertile territory for photographers, as competition naturally makes for compelling  imagery, but Victory and its contributors avoid cliché

The design of each edition relies on a distinction between the text (longer essays are usually set over one or more pages) and the images, which tend to run as uninterrupted series, each picture at full-bleed, with brief captions. “This is my preferred way to digest information,” says Amaro of this rationale. “Separate the reading from the viewing. They use different parts of the brain. You read a piece then you take your time with the art. I find it a better way to mentally digest an idea. I kind of hate pull quotes, I think it forces a different hierarchy to the narrative.”

Opening spreads to Kenny Hurtado’s photo series on ‘open-water’ swimming (issue 12)

Online, Victory neatly transfers its approach to narrative and aesthetics to the digital sphere – its underlying values apply across the board, says Isenberg, “whether that’s print, online, film, Instagram, podcast, or event”. Take the film Kite Fight that Victory made in Brazil. “It was something where still photography really just didn’t capture the interest of kite-fighting – and we tried,” Isenberg recalls. “And with the film you can see and hear the place and meet the people, in a very different way to a written story, but the DNA is still Victory. It’s also awesome to collaborate with contributors who work exclusively in moving image, or who cross over between stills and video. And when you have something strong here, it can be seen by hundreds of thousands or millions of people.”

Opening spread to Alejandra Carles-Tolra’s photo story on Brown University’s women’s rugby team from Victory Journal 12

Isenberg adds that since Victory has been working with contributing editor Nathaniel Friedman, he has been pushing the title to be more prolific online. While some online stories will be covered in the magazine as well, he explains, “others are topical in a way that wouldn’t make sense for the book, but still feel animated by the same fundamental guidelines. And it’s very interesting to see Victory engage with the present in that way, it wasn’t something we were all that comfortable doing when we set out, but it’s exciting to see it happen in way that feels true to us.”

Visiting supporters from Calcio Padova S.p.A photographed by Alessandro Simonetti for Peter Macia’s Victory Journal 13 feature on Venezia FC

While the approaches to Victory’s photo stories are in one sense determined by the individual photographers, for Isenberg it’s what Amaro, Photo Editor Shane Lyons and the team then do with the material that brings the range of sports and disciplines into a single, unified volume. “They spend a lot of time getting the individual stories and the overall book right, with everyone chiming in a bit,” he says. “There’s a flow we’re trying to get to which has to do both with the variety and not repeating beats and that kind of looking directly at the action and then looking away from it. It’s become a much gnarlier challenge both to get the right material and to order it as the book’s gotten thicker, but rising to that and getting an issue to where it feels strong in that way is a huge driver for all of us.”


Banner image: Trainer Michael Lorraine and his Malinois dog practice targeting during the North American Ring Association’s Western Regional Trial. The image forms part of Noah Davis’s essay on the sport of French Ring, which features photographs by Jared Ryder. French Ring is a so-called ‘protection’ sport which tests a dog’s ability to protect itself and its handler

Victory Journal is published biannually ($16). Issue 13, Tooth & Nail, is out now

victoryjournal.com, @victoryjournal

The post Magazine of the year: Victory Journal appeared first on Creative Review.

Source: http://ift.tt/1KjyLUn

Helen Musselwhite recreates London landmarks in paper for Molton Brown

Helen Musselwhite has crafted animals, buildings and intricate woodland scenes out of paper for some of the UK’s biggest brands. This summer she was asked to craft London landmarks and street scenes out of paper for cosmetics brand Molton Brown.

Musselwhite had just four weeks to build nine festive scenes for Molton Brown’s Christmas campaign. Working from her studio in Manchester, she created models of Buckingham Palace, the National Gallery, Tower Bridge, the Royal Albert Hall and the London Eye. Her designs are featured in stores and window displays as well as social media posts and ads. They have also been brought to life in a festive animation created by motion designer Jonathan Lindgren (shown below).

Emma Beamish – a senior creative at Molton Brown – approached agency Handsome Frank with the idea and some sketches showing different scenes. (The brand was founded in London in 1973 and wanted to create window displays that would reflect this heritage.)

“Emma had a very clear view of what she wanted and gave me these really great briefs and I translated that concept into paper,” explains Musselwhite. 

Musselwhite spent three to four days creating each scene. “I started by researching the buildings a little more and just doing drawings of them. I try to do quite quick drawings but do them to scale and then I enlarge them on a photocopier. I’ll then take that first drawing, lay tracing paper over it and draw into it again [this time adding more detail] and then I’ll transfer that from tracing paper onto the paper I’m using and start to build up the layers.”

The most challenging design was the grand staircase at Buckingham Palace. Musselwhite had to make sure the structure was strong enough to support itself and the weight of products placed on top. She also cut an ‘MB’ monogram into the staircase and created an intricate patterned carpet and balustrades featuring designs from Molton Brown’s packaging.

“Cutting that out by hand took a long time and then I had to kind of coerce the paper to curve around the stairs to make a banister. Sometimes I forget I’m working with paper – I think of something in my head and think ‘that’ll be fine’ – and then I get to the stage where I think ‘maybe I’m asking it to do a little too much!’” she adds. “That one was particularly taxing and it took a long time to get my head around it but it was good because I learned a new skill.”

Molton Brown enlisted stylist Bianca Zehra to create POS and window displays. These were then photographed by still-life photographer Ben Edwards.

Musselwhite’s work might be analogue – crafted by hand from physical products – but it stands out just as much on a digital screen as it does on a shop window.

“When people look at [the designs] I think you can tell it’s hand made. Sometimes I get worried about that because I want things to be perfect – we live in a digital world and we’re so used to seeing perfection – but I think it’s nice to see the touch of a human hand.” 

Crafting such detailed designs can be a long and lonely process – “I heard a lot of dawn choruses and saw a lot of sunrises,” says Musselwhite – but it’s also one that she finds hugely rewarding.

“It can be a bit lonely when you’re in the studio at 2.30am cutting out a window of Buckingham Palace while listening to BBC World Service – you start to think ‘will this ever end?’ – but then you see the end product and it makes your heart skip a beat. You feel really proud and really privileged that you were asked to work on something like that – something that’s taken the humble piece of paper and just gone wild with it,” she says.

Musselwhite describes each scene as “a kind of miniature stage set”. She has been creating imaginative artworks out of paper for several years but each project still presents new challenges – in this case, using geometry to build detailed designs and curved structures that wouldn’t collapse under the weight of Molton Brown’s bath and beauty products.

I think it’s important to try and push yourself – that’s what keeps it fresh and exciting,” adds Musselwhite. “You can’t always do it because you’re not always allowed to within a brief but this was different.”

The post Helen Musselwhite recreates London landmarks in paper for Molton Brown appeared first on Creative Review.

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John Minton: Drawn from Life

Published by The Mainstone Press in the centenary year of John Minton’s birth, Martin Salisbury’s new book collects together the artist’s illustrations and cover designs for books, magazines and journals, placing them alongside a host of lesser-known projects for ad agencies, publishers, theatre producers and wallpaper manufacturers.

Minton was a prolific artist, yet his working life actually lasted a little over a decade. He led, Salisbury writes in his introduction, a “short, chaotic and ultimately tragic life”. Minton took his own life on January 20 1957. He was 39 years old.

Preliminary design for The Wanderer, 1947. Private collection. John Minton © The Estate of John Minton/Royal College of Art, London

As with Minton’s brief career, Salisbury’s book focuses on a relatively short-lived moment in the history of book design and illustration in the UK, which ran roughly from the end of the Second World War until the late 1950s.

Salisbury refers to the period as a “flowering” of romanticism, where artists and publishers came together to produce “a legacy of publications that are increasingly appreciated among the finest examples of the twentieth century illustrated book” – a pervasive spirit of looking back that also entered into the worlds of advertising and design.

An Affair of Love, Kay Dick, Heinemann, 1953. John Minton © The Estate of John Minton/Royal College of Art, London

After art school in London, and a brief stint in Paris, Minton joined the Pioneer Corps in 1941. Two years later he was commissioned as an infantry officer but was invalided out – the official reason, Salisbury writes, was that he endured a psychiatric breakdown having disclosed his sexuality.

The Dark Peninsula, Ernest Frost, John Lehmann, 1949. John Minton © The Estate of John Minton/Royal College of Art, London

Yet, in his short and eventful life, Minton managed to have his work recognised in seven one-man shows and a single group show and his reputation as an artist and draughtsman was formidable. “In total, he designed an impressive sixty jackets for hardback books and six paperback book covers,” Salisbury notes. “Of the latter, five were designs for John Lehmann’s influential Penguin New Writing series.”

Time Was Away, Alan Ross, John Lehmann, 1948. John Minton © The Estate of John Minton/Royal College of Art, London

While Lehmann was to become Minton’s most important client (the editor had worked at the Hogarth Press with Leonard Woolf before launching his own company), Minton was also involved with many different types of commercial projects. Ad agencies loved his work, for example, and he made posters for a range of clients such as Ealing Studios, the General Post Office and London Transport, among others.

A Book of Mediterranean Food, Elizabeth David, John Lehmann, 1950. John Minton © The Estate of John Minton/Royal College of Art, London

Minton also taught illustration –firstly at Camberwell School of Arts and Crafts, then at the Central School of Arts and Crafts, before gaining work in the painting school at the Royal College of Art. Salisbury makes good use of a 1952 lecture that Minton gave to students at the City of Birmingham College of Arts and Crafts, on the nature and importance of ‘subject’:

“It will only happen if it is really done with love… It’s like a blacksmith having all the appropriate tools but no fire,” he says. “He can hammer away indefinitely but nothing will happen – not even abstract sculpture. For it is something to do with having a real love for the subject, having a real anxiety it will escape: not just tolerating it as a possible subject, but loving it.”

The Derelict Day, Alan Ross, John Lehmann, 1947. John Minton © The Estate of John Minton/Royal College of Art, London

This attitude was, however, unaligned with the new thinking that was slowly to nudge Minton’s work out of favour – approaches that focused on the more formal aspects of painting; on abstraction, rather than representation or narrative.


Yet it is perhaps this very difficulty he faced that brings Minton’s work to the fore today. As Salisbury notes, much of his art was made manifest through tangible objects, the placing of pictures with text within something invariably held in the hand. “The freshness and immediacy of his work, an almost innocent devotion to drawing that flows from observation, have a particular appeal today as we rediscover the haptic experience of the physical book.”

While Minton may not have had long to make his mark on the world, his decade of productivity “was brim-filled with mercurial, heartfelt and almost overwrought drawing,” Salisbury writes. This book puts the focus firmly back on the beautiful work that Minton produced over this time and on what he should rightly be remembered for.

The Snail That Climbed The Eiffel Tower and Other Work By John Minton by Martin Salisbury is published by The Mainstone Press; £35. See themainstonepress.com

Please Use Your Correct Address poster, GPO, 1957. John Minton © The Estate of John Minton/Royal College of Art, London
Cover of The Mainstone Press book on John Milton’s work, based on his cover of The Snail That Climbed the Eiffel Tower, Odo Cross, John Lehmann, 1947

The post John Minton: Drawn from Life appeared first on Creative Review.

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Untypical Girls

Untypical Girls is a celebration of women in punk and indie, looking back over 16 years, from 1977-1993, and featuring hundreds of images of the key players in Britain and the US.

The book features famous names, from Siouxie Sioux to Ari Up, Kim Gordon to Courtney Love, as well as lesser-known bands and female indie music fans. It documents the way that the UK and US interacted via punk, and also follows author Sam Knee’s own journey through music, as a fan and regular gig-goer.

“The UK and US have constantly fed off each other musically and stylistically since punk’s first wave,” says Knee. “[The book] also follows my life’s path as I spent the 80s going to indie gigs in London, fully immersed in the scene here but always obsessed by the American underground, which led me to then relocate to San Francisco in 1990 as the whole Riot Grrrl phenomena was blowing up.”

Untypical Girls
Top: The Bodysnatchers, 2-Tone ska outfit, Hope and Anchor, London, 1980. Photograph by Neil Anderson; Above: Ari Up of The Slits, Edinburgh, 1979. Photograph by Graham Macindoe
Untypical Girls
Indie record store new wave fashions, Houston, 1980. Photograph by Ben Tecumseh DeSoto
Untypical Girls
Rachel and Gaye Bell of The Twinsets, Edinburgh, 1981. Photograph by Simon Clegg

Untypical Girls’ 16-year timeline tracks the development of the female indie scene, and comes to a close in 1993, when Knee felt the scene was fizzling out. “The vibrancy of the scenes was winding down,” says Knee of why the book ends at that point. “A lot of the groups so vital in the 80s had broken up or were fading into repetition. Riot Grrrl had peaked. Groups were selling out to majors and so on. It was a time of change. I feel like punk’s thread had constantly evolved from ’77 right through to ’93 where the last gasps were heard.”

In researching the images for the book, Knee went direct to the bands that he’d liked from the scene. “I made a list of all the girl bands I liked, or bands with female members, then set about locating unseen shots of them. I really enjoy picture researching more than anything, so for me I loved watching the book gradually fall together. Over time I accumulated over 1,000 indie girl shots, so making the final edit was the hardest thing.” The book also features interviews with some of the musicians, including Debsey Wykes of Dolly Mixture and Julie Cafritz of Pussy Galore.

Untypical Girls
Debsey Wykes of Dolly Mixture on bass, Hope and Anchor, London, 1979. Photograph by Rich Gunter
Untypical Girls
Clare Grogan of Altered Images, London, 1981. Photograph by Neil Anderson
Untypical Girls
Indie record store assistant, Canterbury, 1985. Photograph by Maria Harris

While Untypical Girls features some bands which had a mixed line up of men and women, Knee decided to focus just on the women, resulting in a book that demonstrates the vibrancy and importance of the female music scene. This is an area that is often woefully under-reported, at least within the mainstream music press.

“I think they did [get recognition] within the underground scenes and press but not by the mainstream music press,” says Knee, “who in their Luddite rock-ist outlook perceived girl groups as a novelty, not the serious musician workmanship that was only achieved by males. Back then the weekly music press had a huge influence on any band’s success, and often blinkered, middle-aged male journalists governed these groups’ destinies.”

Untypical Girls
DC hardcore punk style – a cool, tough, uniquely East Coast urban amalgamation of UK skinhead via US hardcore nihilisims. Washington DC, 1981. Photograph: Lloyd Wolf
Untypical Girls
Kim Gordon of Sonic Youth at Maxwells, Hoboken, NJ, 1984. Photograph: Dave Rick
Untypical Girls
Huggy Bear, London, 1992. Photograph by Mick Mercer

The book is a joyous reminder of the attitude and individuality of the women’s indie music movement (even though a definite ‘look’ can be discerned). Knee hopes this may inspire generations to come, even his own daughters.

“I’m a father of two young girls and feel immense worry for them as they grow up into this manufactured, conservative, dross society where everyone looks the same in branded sportswear or Topshop type chain junk, and individuality is out of vogue,” he says.

“I hope the book will be something they can look at and see that they don’t have to be like everyone else, they can wear and say whatever they like and not feel this state of oppressive uniformity which shadows the world we live in today. I’m also selfishly hoping they’ll seek out and rediscover the indie scene and take me to gigs when I’m in my 60s!”

Untypical Girls
Spreads from the book
Untypical Girls
Book cover

Untypical Girls: Styles and Sounds of the Transatlantic Indie Revolution by Sam Knee is published by Cicada Books, priced £19.95; cicadabooks.co.uk. Sam Knee can be found on Instagram @sceneinbetween

The post Untypical Girls appeared first on Creative Review.

Source: http://ift.tt/1KjyLUn

Untypical Girls

Untypical Girls is a celebration of women in punk and indie, looking back over 16 years, from 1977-1993, and featuring hundreds of images of the key players in Britain and the US.

The book features famous names, from Siouxie Sioux to Ari Up, Kim Gordon to Courtney Love, as well as lesser-known bands and female indie music fans. It documents the way that the UK and US interacted via punk, and also follows author Sam Knee’s own journey through music, as a fan and regular gig-goer.

“The UK and US have constantly fed off each other musically and stylistically since punk’s first wave,” says Knee. “[The book] also follows my life’s path as I spent the 80s going to indie gigs in London, fully immersed in the scene here but always obsessed by the American underground, which led me to then relocate to San Francisco in 1990 as the whole Riot Grrrl phenomena was blowing up.”

Untypical Girls
Top: The Bodysnatchers, 2-Tone ska outfit, Hope and Anchor, London, 1980. Photograph by Neil Anderson; Above: Ari Up of The Slits, Edinburgh, 1979. Photograph by Graham Macindoe
Untypical Girls
Indie record store new wave fashions, Houston, 1980. Photograph by Ben Tecumseh DeSoto
Untypical Girls
Rachel and Gaye Bell of The Twinsets, Edinburgh, 1981. Photograph by Simon Clegg

Untypical Girls’ 16-year timeline tracks the development of the female indie scene, and comes to a close in 1993, when Knee felt the scene was fizzling out. “The vibrancy of the scenes was winding down,” says Knee of why the book ends at that point. “A lot of the groups so vital in the 80s had broken up or were fading into repetition. Riot Grrrl had peaked. Groups were selling out to majors and so on. It was a time of change. I feel like punk’s thread had constantly evolved from ’77 right through to ’93 where the last gasps were heard.”

In researching the images for the book, Knee went direct to the bands that he’d liked from the scene. “I made a list of all the girl bands I liked, or bands with female members, then set about locating unseen shots of them. I really enjoy picture researching more than anything, so for me I loved watching the book gradually fall together. Over time I accumulated over 1,000 indie girl shots, so making the final edit was the hardest thing.” The book also features interviews with some of the musicians, including Debsey Wykes of Dolly Mixture and Julie Cafritz of Pussy Galore.

Untypical Girls
Debsey Wykes of Dolly Mixture on bass, Hope and Anchor, London, 1979. Photograph by Rich Gunter
Untypical Girls
Clare Grogan of Altered Images, London, 1981. Photograph by Neil Anderson
Untypical Girls
Indie record store assistant, Canterbury, 1985. Photograph by Maria Harris

While Untypical Girls features some bands which had a mixed line up of men and women, Knee decided to focus just on the women, resulting in a book that demonstrates the vibrancy and importance of the female music scene. This is an area that is often woefully under-reported, at least within the mainstream music press.

“I think they did [get recognition] within the underground scenes and press but not by the mainstream music press,” says Knee, “who in their Luddite rock-ist outlook perceived girl groups as a novelty, not the serious musician workmanship that was only achieved by males. Back then the weekly music press had a huge influence on any band’s success, and often blinkered, middle-aged male journalists governed these groups’ destinies.”

Untypical Girls
DC hardcore punk style – a cool, tough, uniquely East Coast urban amalgamation of UK skinhead via US hardcore nihilisims. Washington DC, 1981. Photograph: Lloyd Wolf
Untypical Girls
Kim Gordon of Sonic Youth at Maxwells, Hoboken, NJ, 1984. Photograph: Dave Rick
Untypical Girls
Huggy Bear, London, 1992. Photograph by Mick Mercer

The book is a joyous reminder of the attitude and individuality of the women’s indie music movement (even though a definite ‘look’ can be discerned). Knee hopes this may inspire generations to come, even his own daughters.

“I’m a father of two young girls and feel immense worry for them as they grow up into this manufactured, conservative, dross society where everyone looks the same in branded sportswear or Topshop type chain junk, and individuality is out of vogue,” he says.

“I hope the book will be something they can look at and see that they don’t have to be like everyone else, they can wear and say whatever they like and not feel this state of oppressive uniformity which shadows the world we live in today. I’m also selfishly hoping they’ll seek out and rediscover the indie scene and take me to gigs when I’m in my 60s!”

Untypical Girls
Spreads from the book
Untypical Girls
Book cover

Untypical Girls: Styles and Sounds of the Transatlantic Indie Revolution by Sam Knee is published by Cicada Books, priced £19.95; cicadabooks.co.uk. Sam Knee can be found on Instagram @sceneinbetween

The post Untypical Girls appeared first on Creative Review.

Source: http://ift.tt/1KjyLUn

Untypical Girls

Untypical Girls is a celebration of women in punk and indie, looking back over 16 years, from 1977-1993, and featuring hundreds of images of the key players in Britain and the US.

The book features famous names, from Siouxie Sioux to Ari Up, Kim Gordon to Courtney Love, as well as lesser-known bands and female indie music fans. It documents the way that the UK and US interacted via punk, and also follows author Sam Knee’s own journey through music, as a fan and regular gig-goer.

“The UK and US have constantly fed off each other musically and stylistically since punk’s first wave,” says Knee. “[The book] also follows my life’s path as I spent the 80s going to indie gigs in London, fully immersed in the scene here but always obsessed by the American underground, which led me to then relocate to San Francisco in 1990 as the whole Riot Grrrl phenomena was blowing up.”

Untypical Girls
Top: The Bodysnatchers, 2-Tone ska outfit, Hope and Anchor, London, 1980. Photograph by Neil Anderson; Above: Ari Up of The Slits, Edinburgh, 1979. Photograph by Graham Macindoe
Untypical Girls
Indie record store new wave fashions, Houston, 1980. Photograph by Ben Tecumseh DeSoto
Untypical Girls
Rachel and Gaye Bell of The Twinsets, Edinburgh, 1981. Photograph by Simon Clegg

Untypical Girls’ 16-year timeline tracks the development of the female indie scene, and comes to a close in 1993, when Knee felt the scene was fizzling out. “The vibrancy of the scenes was winding down,” says Knee of why the book ends at that point. “A lot of the groups so vital in the 80s had broken up or were fading into repetition. Riot Grrrl had peaked. Groups were selling out to majors and so on. It was a time of change. I feel like punk’s thread had constantly evolved from ’77 right through to ’93 where the last gasps were heard.”

In researching the images for the book, Knee went direct to the bands that he’d liked from the scene. “I made a list of all the girl bands I liked, or bands with female members, then set about locating unseen shots of them. I really enjoy picture researching more than anything, so for me I loved watching the book gradually fall together. Over time I accumulated over 1,000 indie girl shots, so making the final edit was the hardest thing.” The book also features interviews with some of the musicians, including Debsey Wykes of Dolly Mixture and Julie Cafritz of Pussy Galore.

Untypical Girls
Debsey Wykes of Dolly Mixture on bass, Hope and Anchor, London, 1979. Photograph by Rich Gunter
Untypical Girls
Clare Grogan of Altered Images, London, 1981. Photograph by Neil Anderson
Untypical Girls
Indie record store assistant, Canterbury, 1985. Photograph by Maria Harris

While Untypical Girls features some bands which had a mixed line up of men and women, Knee decided to focus just on the women, resulting in a book that demonstrates the vibrancy and importance of the female music scene. This is an area that is often woefully under-reported, at least within the mainstream music press.

“I think they did [get recognition] within the underground scenes and press but not by the mainstream music press,” says Knee, “who in their Luddite rock-ist outlook perceived girl groups as a novelty, not the serious musician workmanship that was only achieved by males. Back then the weekly music press had a huge influence on any band’s success, and often blinkered, middle-aged male journalists governed these groups’ destinies.”

Untypical Girls
DC hardcore punk style – a cool, tough, uniquely East Coast urban amalgamation of UK skinhead via US hardcore nihilisims. Washington DC, 1981. Photograph: Lloyd Wolf
Untypical Girls
Kim Gordon of Sonic Youth at Maxwells, Hoboken, NJ, 1984. Photograph: Dave Rick
Untypical Girls
Huggy Bear, London, 1992. Photograph by Mick Mercer

The book is a joyous reminder of the attitude and individuality of the women’s indie music movement (even though a definite ‘look’ can be discerned). Knee hopes this may inspire generations to come, even his own daughters.

“I’m a father of two young girls and feel immense worry for them as they grow up into this manufactured, conservative, dross society where everyone looks the same in branded sportswear or Topshop type chain junk, and individuality is out of vogue,” he says.

“I hope the book will be something they can look at and see that they don’t have to be like everyone else, they can wear and say whatever they like and not feel this state of oppressive uniformity which shadows the world we live in today. I’m also selfishly hoping they’ll seek out and rediscover the indie scene and take me to gigs when I’m in my 60s!”

Untypical Girls
Spreads from the book
Untypical Girls
Book cover

Untypical Girls: Styles and Sounds of the Transatlantic Indie Revolution by Sam Knee is published by Cicada Books, priced £19.95; cicadabooks.co.uk. Sam Knee can be found on Instagram @sceneinbetween

The post Untypical Girls appeared first on Creative Review.

Source: http://ift.tt/1KjyLUn

Untypical Girls

Untypical Girls is a celebration of women in punk and indie, looking back over 16 years, from 1977-1993, and featuring hundreds of images of the key players in Britain and the US.

The book features famous names, from Siouxie Sioux to Ari Up, Kim Gordon to Courtney Love, as well as lesser-known bands and female indie music fans. It documents the way that the UK and US interacted via punk, and also follows author Sam Knee’s own journey through music, as a fan and regular gig-goer.

“The UK and US have constantly fed off each other musically and stylistically since punk’s first wave,” says Knee. “[The book] also follows my life’s path as I spent the 80s going to indie gigs in London, fully immersed in the scene here but always obsessed by the American underground, which led me to then relocate to San Francisco in 1990 as the whole Riot Grrrl phenomena was blowing up.”

Untypical Girls
Top: The Bodysnatchers, 2-Tone ska outfit, Hope and Anchor, London, 1980. Photograph by Neil Anderson; Above: Ari Up of The Slits, Edinburgh, 1979. Photograph by Graham Macindoe
Untypical Girls
Indie record store new wave fashions, Houston, 1980. Photograph by Ben Tecumseh DeSoto
Untypical Girls
Rachel and Gaye Bell of The Twinsets, Edinburgh, 1981. Photograph by Simon Clegg

Untypical Girls’ 16-year timeline tracks the development of the female indie scene, and comes to a close in 1993, when Knee felt the scene was fizzling out. “The vibrancy of the scenes was winding down,” says Knee of why the book ends at that point. “A lot of the groups so vital in the 80s had broken up or were fading into repetition. Riot Grrrl had peaked. Groups were selling out to majors and so on. It was a time of change. I feel like punk’s thread had constantly evolved from ’77 right through to ’93 where the last gasps were heard.”

In researching the images for the book, Knee went direct to the bands that he’d liked from the scene. “I made a list of all the girl bands I liked, or bands with female members, then set about locating unseen shots of them. I really enjoy picture researching more than anything, so for me I loved watching the book gradually fall together. Over time I accumulated over 1,000 indie girl shots, so making the final edit was the hardest thing.” The book also features interviews with some of the musicians, including Debsey Wykes of Dolly Mixture and Julie Cafritz of Pussy Galore.

Untypical Girls
Debsey Wykes of Dolly Mixture on bass, Hope and Anchor, London, 1979. Photograph by Rich Gunter
Untypical Girls
Clare Grogan of Altered Images, London, 1981. Photograph by Neil Anderson
Untypical Girls
Indie record store assistant, Canterbury, 1985. Photograph by Maria Harris

While Untypical Girls features some bands which had a mixed line up of men and women, Knee decided to focus just on the women, resulting in a book that demonstrates the vibrancy and importance of the female music scene. This is an area that is often woefully under-reported, at least within the mainstream music press.

“I think they did [get recognition] within the underground scenes and press but not by the mainstream music press,” says Knee, “who in their Luddite rock-ist outlook perceived girl groups as a novelty, not the serious musician workmanship that was only achieved by males. Back then the weekly music press had a huge influence on any band’s success, and often blinkered, middle-aged male journalists governed these groups’ destinies.”

Untypical Girls
DC hardcore punk style – a cool, tough, uniquely East Coast urban amalgamation of UK skinhead via US hardcore nihilisims. Washington DC, 1981. Photograph: Lloyd Wolf
Untypical Girls
Kim Gordon of Sonic Youth at Maxwells, Hoboken, NJ, 1984. Photograph: Dave Rick
Untypical Girls
Huggy Bear, London, 1992. Photograph by Mick Mercer

The book is a joyous reminder of the attitude and individuality of the women’s indie music movement (even though a definite ‘look’ can be discerned). Knee hopes this may inspire generations to come, even his own daughters.

“I’m a father of two young girls and feel immense worry for them as they grow up into this manufactured, conservative, dross society where everyone looks the same in branded sportswear or Topshop type chain junk, and individuality is out of vogue,” he says.

“I hope the book will be something they can look at and see that they don’t have to be like everyone else, they can wear and say whatever they like and not feel this state of oppressive uniformity which shadows the world we live in today. I’m also selfishly hoping they’ll seek out and rediscover the indie scene and take me to gigs when I’m in my 60s!”

Untypical Girls
Spreads from the book
Untypical Girls
Book cover

Untypical Girls: Styles and Sounds of the Transatlantic Indie Revolution by Sam Knee is published by Cicada Books, priced £19.95; cicadabooks.co.uk. Sam Knee can be found on Instagram @sceneinbetween

The post Untypical Girls appeared first on Creative Review.

Source: http://ift.tt/1KjyLUn

Untypical Girls

Untypical Girls is a celebration of women in punk and indie, looking back over 16 years, from 1977-1993, and featuring hundreds of images of the key players in Britain and the US.

The book features famous names, from Siouxie Sioux to Ari Up, Kim Gordon to Courtney Love, as well as lesser-known bands and female indie music fans. It documents the way that the UK and US interacted via punk, and also follows author Sam Knee’s own journey through music, as a fan and regular gig-goer.

“The UK and US have constantly fed off each other musically and stylistically since punk’s first wave,” says Knee. “[The book] also follows my life’s path as I spent the 80s going to indie gigs in London, fully immersed in the scene here but always obsessed by the American underground, which led me to then relocate to San Francisco in 1990 as the whole Riot Grrrl phenomena was blowing up.”

Untypical Girls
Top: The Bodysnatchers, 2-Tone ska outfit, Hope and Anchor, London, 1980. Photograph by Neil Anderson; Above: Ari Up of The Slits, Edinburgh, 1979. Photograph by Graham Macindoe
Untypical Girls
Indie record store new wave fashions, Houston, 1980. Photograph by Ben Tecumseh DeSoto
Untypical Girls
Rachel and Gaye Bell of The Twinsets, Edinburgh, 1981. Photograph by Simon Clegg

Untypical Girls’ 16-year timeline tracks the development of the female indie scene, and comes to a close in 1993, when Knee felt the scene was fizzling out. “The vibrancy of the scenes was winding down,” says Knee of why the book ends at that point. “A lot of the groups so vital in the 80s had broken up or were fading into repetition. Riot Grrrl had peaked. Groups were selling out to majors and so on. It was a time of change. I feel like punk’s thread had constantly evolved from ’77 right through to ’93 where the last gasps were heard.”

In researching the images for the book, Knee went direct to the bands that he’d liked from the scene. “I made a list of all the girl bands I liked, or bands with female members, then set about locating unseen shots of them. I really enjoy picture researching more than anything, so for me I loved watching the book gradually fall together. Over time I accumulated over 1,000 indie girl shots, so making the final edit was the hardest thing.” The book also features interviews with some of the musicians, including Debsey Wykes of Dolly Mixture and Julie Cafritz of Pussy Galore.

Untypical Girls
Debsey Wykes of Dolly Mixture on bass, Hope and Anchor, London, 1979. Photograph by Rich Gunter
Untypical Girls
Clare Grogan of Altered Images, London, 1981. Photograph by Neil Anderson
Untypical Girls
Indie record store assistant, Canterbury, 1985. Photograph by Maria Harris

While Untypical Girls features some bands which had a mixed line up of men and women, Knee decided to focus just on the women, resulting in a book that demonstrates the vibrancy and importance of the female music scene. This is an area that is often woefully under-reported, at least within the mainstream music press.

“I think they did [get recognition] within the underground scenes and press but not by the mainstream music press,” says Knee, “who in their Luddite rock-ist outlook perceived girl groups as a novelty, not the serious musician workmanship that was only achieved by males. Back then the weekly music press had a huge influence on any band’s success, and often blinkered, middle-aged male journalists governed these groups’ destinies.”

Untypical Girls
DC hardcore punk style – a cool, tough, uniquely East Coast urban amalgamation of UK skinhead via US hardcore nihilisims. Washington DC, 1981. Photograph: Lloyd Wolf
Untypical Girls
Kim Gordon of Sonic Youth at Maxwells, Hoboken, NJ, 1984. Photograph: Dave Rick
Untypical Girls
Huggy Bear, London, 1992. Photograph by Mick Mercer

The book is a joyous reminder of the attitude and individuality of the women’s indie music movement (even though a definite ‘look’ can be discerned). Knee hopes this may inspire generations to come, even his own daughters.

“I’m a father of two young girls and feel immense worry for them as they grow up into this manufactured, conservative, dross society where everyone looks the same in branded sportswear or Topshop type chain junk, and individuality is out of vogue,” he says.

“I hope the book will be something they can look at and see that they don’t have to be like everyone else, they can wear and say whatever they like and not feel this state of oppressive uniformity which shadows the world we live in today. I’m also selfishly hoping they’ll seek out and rediscover the indie scene and take me to gigs when I’m in my 60s!”

Untypical Girls
Spreads from the book
Untypical Girls
Book cover

Untypical Girls: Styles and Sounds of the Transatlantic Indie Revolution by Sam Knee is published by Cicada Books, priced £19.95; cicadabooks.co.uk. Sam Knee can be found on Instagram @sceneinbetween

The post Untypical Girls appeared first on Creative Review.

Source: http://ift.tt/1KjyLUn