Aperture’s Holiday Gift Guide

This year, Aperture publications have explored how fashion photography can serve as a vehicle for social change, how photography empowers transgender communities, the black dandy movement, our relationship to food, and more. From iconic monographs by master photographers, to groundbreaking, never-before-published work, we offer titles for everyone on your holiday list.

For the Collector

 

Intimate Distance: Twenty-five Years of Photographs, A Chronological Album
Intimate Distance is the first comprehensive monograph charting the career of acclaimed American photographer Todd Hido. Though he has published many smaller individual bodies of work, this book gathers his most iconic images for the first time and brings a fresh perspective to his oeuvre with the inclusion of many unpublished photographs.

 

Illuminance Limited-Edition Box Set
Rinko Kawauchi’s work has frequently been lauded for its nuanced palette and offhand compositional mastery, as well as its ability to incite wonder through careful attention to tiny gestures and the incidental details of her everyday environment. In Illuminance, Kawauchi continues her exploration of the extraordinary in the mundane. This limited-edition boxed set includes a specially bound copy of the artist’s monograph Illuminance (Aperture, 2011) and two beautiful prints of images found in the book, all presented in a clothbound case.

 

Stephen Shore: Selected Works, 1973–1981
Stephen Shore’s Uncommon Places is a canonic body of work—a touchstone for those interested in photography and the American landscape. Remarkably, this series of photographs has yet to be explored in its entirety. Over the past five years, Shore has scanned hundreds of negatives shot between 1973 and 1981. In this volume, Aperture has invited an international group of fifteen photographers, curators, authors, and cultural figures to select ten images apiece from this rarely seen cache of images.

 

John Chiara: California
John Chiara creates his own cameras and chemical processes in order to make unique photographs that use the direct exposure of light onto reversal film and paper. Each resulting image is a singular, luminous object. This highly anticipated first book includes the surreal and thrilling landscape and architectural photographs for which the artist has become known. John Chiara: California features pictures taken in the artist’s hometown of San Francisco and other locations along the Pacific Coast.


Great Storytelling

The Notion of Family
Now available in a paperback edition, LaToya Ruby Frazier’s award-winning first book, The Notion of Family, offers an incisive exploration of the legacy of racism and economic decline in America’s small towns, as embodied by her hometown of Braddock, Pennsylvania.

Jonas Bendiksen: The Last Testament
Imagined as a sequel to the Old and New Testaments of the Bible, The Last Testament features visual accounts and stories of seven men around the world who claim to be the Second Coming of Jesus Christ.


Susan Meiselas: On the Frontline
Susan Meiselas, one of the most influential photographers of our time and an important contributor to the evolution of documentary storytelling, provides an insightful personal commentary on the trajectory of her career.


Tabitha Soren: Fantasy Life
In 2002, Tabitha Soren began photographing a group of minor league draft picks for the Oakland A’s. Fifteen years after that first shoot, Fantasy Life portrays a selection of these stories, gathering together a richly textured series of photographs taken on the field and behind the scenes at games, along with commentaries by each of the players and memorabilia from their lives.


Intersectional Inspirational


Future Gender
The Winter 2017 issue of Aperture magazine is dedicated to the representation of transgender lives, communities, and histories in photography. Guest edited by Zackary Drucker, the artist, activist, and producer of the acclaimed television series Transparent, “Future Gender” considers how trans and gender-nonconforming individuals have used photography to imagine new expressions of social and personal identity, from the nineteenth century to today.

Muse: Mickalene Thomas Photographs
Mickalene Thomas, known for her large-scale, multi-textured, and rhinestone-encrusted paintings of domestic interiors and portraits, identifies the photographic image as a defining touchstone for her practice. Thomas’s portraits draw equally from 1970s black-is-beautiful images of women such as supermodel Beverly Johnson and actress Vonetta McGee to Édouard Manet’s odalisque figures.

On Feminism
The winter 2016 issue of Aperture, “On Feminism,” focuses on intergenerational dialogues, debates, and strategies of feminism in photography, and considers the immense contributions by artists whose work articulates or interrogates representations of women in media and society. Across more than one hundred years of photographs and images, “On Feminism” underscores how photography has shaped feminism as much as how feminism has shaped photography.


Question Bridge: Black Males in America
Question Bridge assembles a series of questions posed to black men, by and for other black men, along with the corresponding responses and portraits of the participants. The questions range from the comic to the sublimely philosophical: from “Am I the only one who has problems eating chicken, watermelon, and bananas in front of white people?” to “Why is it so difficult for black American men in this culture to be themselves, their essential selves, and remain who they truly are?”


Wanderlust


Highway Kind
Since 2004, Justine Kurland, known for her utopian photographs of American landscapes and their fringe communities, and her young son, Casper, have traveled in their customized van, going south in the winter and north in the summer. Her life as an artist and mother is finely balanced between the need for routine and the desire for freedom and surprise. Kurland’s deep interest in the road, the western frontier, escape, and living outside mainstream values pervade this stunning and important body of work.


The Open Road: Photography and the American Road Trip
The road trip is an enduring symbol in American culture. As photographers have embarked on trips across the United States with the express purpose of making work, they have created some of the most important photographs in the history of the medium: from images by Walker Evans, Henri Cartier-Bresson, and Berenice Abbott to Robert Frank’s 1950s odyssey, The Americans. From Stephen Shore to Ryan McGinley, hundreds of other photographers have continued the tradition. The Open Road is the first book to explore the photographic road trip as a genre.


This Is Mars: Midi Edition

This Is Mars offers a thrilling visual experience of the surface of the red planet. The award-winning French editor and designer Xavier Barral has chosen and composed images, drawn from the comprehensive photographic map of Mars made by the U.S. observation satellite MRO (Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter), to revel in the wonder of Mars.


Foodie


Feast for the Eyes: The Story of Food in Photography
From basic sustenance to savory repasts, food awakens the senses and touches both private and public life. This is the first book to cover food photography’s rich history—not only in fine art photography, but also in crossover genres such as commercial and scientific photography and photojournalism.


The Photographer’s Cookbook
Playing off George Eastman’s famous recipe for lemon meringue pie, as well as former director Beaumont Newhall’s love of food, the cookbook grew from the idea that photographers’ talent in the darkroom must also translate into special skills in the kitchen. An extensive and distinctive archive of recipes and photographs are published in The Photographer’s Cookbook for the first time.


Downtown Kid


Lyle Ashton Harris: Today I Shall Judge Nothing That Occurs
Throughout the late 1980s and early 1990s, a radical cultural scene emerged in cities across the globe, finding expression in the galleries, nightclubs, and bedrooms of New York, London, Los Angeles, and Rome. In Lyle Ashton Harris: Today I Shall Judge Nothing That Occurs, the artist’s archive of 35 mm Ektachrome images are presented alongside journal entries and recollections by contributors such as Vince Aletti, Rashid Johnson, and Sarah Lewis.


Manhattan Sunday
Drawing heavily on personal experience, Richard Renaldi captures that ethereal moment when Saturday night bleeds into Sunday morning across the borough of Manhattan. This collection of portraits, landscapes, and club interiors evokes the vibrant nighttime rhythms of a city that persists in both its decadence and its dreams.


The Ballad of Sexual Dependency
The Ballad of Sexual Dependency is a visual diary chronicling the struggle for intimacy and understanding between friends, family, and lovers—collectively described by Goldin as her “tribe.” Her work describes a world that is visceral, charged, and seething with life. First published in 1986, this reissue recognizes the persistent relevance and freshness of Nan Goldin’s cutting-edge photography.


Peter Hujar: Speed of Life
Underappreciated during his lifetime, Peter Hujar is now a revered icon of the downtown art scene. He is best-known for his portraits of New York City’s artists, musicians, writers, and performers, which feature characters such as Susan Sontag, William S. Burroughs, David Wojnarowicz, and Andy Warhol. Hujar and was admired for his completely uncompromising attitude toward work and life.


Inner Child/Actual Child


Seeing Things, A Kid’s Guide to Looking at Photographs
Aimed at children between the ages of nine and twelve, Seeing Things is a wonderful introduction to photography that asks how photographers transform ordinary things into meaningful moments. In this book, acclaimed and beloved photographer Joel Meyerowitz takes readers on a journey through the power and magic of photography.


The Martin Parr Coloring Book!
Photography and Pop-culture buffs, get out your crayons and colored pencils! Martin Parr’s colorful, tongue-in-cheek photographs—his comedy of contemporary manners—have been transformed into a coloring book.


Go Photo!
Go Photo! features twenty-five hands-on and creative activities inspired by photography. Aimed at children between eight and twelve years old, this playful and fun collection of projects encourages young readers to experiment with their imaginations, get messy with materials, and engage with the world in new and exciting ways.


Nature Lover


A Wild Life: A Visual Biography of Photographer Michael Nichols
A Wild Life is Michael “Nick” Nichols’s story, told with passion and insight by author and photo-editor Melissa Harris. Nichols’ story combines a life of adventure, with a conviction about how we can redeem the human race by protecting our wildlife.


Picturing America’s National Parks
Picturing America’s National Parks brings together some of the finest landscape photography, from America’s most magnificent and sacred environments. Photography has played an integral role in both the formation of the National Parks and in the depiction of America itself. This book traces that history and delights readers with stunning photographs of the best American landscapes.


Cape Light
Cape Light, Joel Meyerowitz’s series of serene and contemplative color photographs taken on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, quickly became one of the most influential and popular photography books in the latter part of the twentieth century. Now, over thirty-five years later, Aperture is pleased to bring back this classic collection in its original form.


Fashion Forward


Fashion Photography: The Story in 180 Pictures
Fashion photography captures our desires and fantasies about how we present ourselves to the world, while reflecting the changing values of our culture and society. Fashion Photography: The Story in 180 Pictures explores the profound influence that fashion photography has had over the past eight decades, presenting its evolution as a language, and a genre, while showcasing some of its most glamorous moments.


Dandy Lion: The Black Dandy and Street Style
Suits that pop with loud colors and dazzling patterns, complete with a nearly ubiquitous bowtie, define the style of the new “dandy.” Described as “high-styled rebels” by author Shantrelle P. Lewis, black men with a penchant for color and refined fashion ave gained popular attention in recent years. Lewis’s carefully curated selection of contemporary photographs surveys the movement across the globe, with all of the vibrant patterns, electrifying colors, and fanciful poses of this brilliant style subculture.


Louise Dahl-Wolfe
Louise Dahl-Wolfe opens a window onto the work of one of the most influential fashion photographers of the twentieth century. After being discovered by Edward Steichen and having her work exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, in 1937, Louise Dahl-Wolfe went on to revitalize the Hollywood portrait and invigorate fashion photography of the 1930s, ’40s, and ’50s.


Design Savvy


Rinko Kawauchi: Halo
In recent years, Rinko Kawauchi’s exploration of the cadences of the everyday has begun to swing farther afield. In Halo, Kawauchi expands this inquiry, this time with photographs of the southern coastal region of Izumo, in Shimane Prefecture and interweaving them with images from New Year celebrations in Hebei province, China, plus her ongoing fascination with the murmuration of birds along the coast of Brighton, England. Kawauchi mesmerizingly knits together cycles of time, implicit and subliminal patterns of nature, and human ritual.

The Many Lives of Erik Kessels
The Many Lives of Erik Kessels presents the highly anticipated first illustrated survey of this pioneering and influential curator, editor, and artist whose varied experiments with photography and photographic archives reconsider the medium’s vernacular and narrative possibilities in today’s inundated image landscape.

 

Self Publish, Be Happy: A DIY Photobook Manual and Manifesto
An economic and cultural revolution has shaken the photobook world in the last five years: self-publishing. An army of photographers operating as publishers have had an instrumental role in today’s photobook renaissance. This book offers a do-it-yourself manual and a survey of key examples of self-published success stories, as well as a self-publishing manifesto and list of resources.


Classic Cat


Bruce Davidson: Survey
This survey focuses on the work that has made Bruce Davidson one of the most influential documentary photographers to this day. In his work, Davidson prizes his relationship to the subject above all else. From his profound documentation of the civil rights movement to his in-depth study of one derelict block in Harlem, he has immersed himself fully in his projects.


Elliot Erwitt: Home Around the World
Elliott Erwitt: Home Around the World offers a timely and critical reconsideration of Erwitt’s unparalleled life as a photographer. Produced alongside a major retrospective exhibition, the book features examples of Erwitt’s early experiments in California, intimate family portraits in New York, major magazine assignments, long-term documentary interests, and ongoing, personal investigations of public spaces.


Lisette Model
Lisette Model is an unsurpassed introduction to one of the twentieth century’s most significant photographers—a woman whose searing images and eloquent teachings deeply influenced her students who included Diane Arbus, Larry Fink, and many others.

The post Aperture’s Holiday Gift Guide appeared first on Aperture Foundation NY.

Source: https://aperture.org

Friday essay: the myth of the ancient Greek ‘gay utopia’

The Fall of the Titans, Cornelis Cornelisz van Haarlem, circa 1590 Wikimedia

In our sexual histories series, authors explore changing sexual mores from antiquity to today.

In recent years, we have seen significant advances won for LGBT rights through hard-fought legal cases and well-targeted political campaigns. Yet it is worth remembering that for decades, recourse to such methods was not available to LGBT people. The law-court and the parliament were deaf to their pleas. For many, it was only in their dreams that they could escape oppression.

One should not underplay the importance of such fantasies. They provided succour and hope in a grim world. It was comforting to imagine a time before Christianity told you that the acts of love that you committed were a sin or the law pronounced that your public displays of affection were acts of “gross indecency”. The persistent dream of a “gay utopia” is one of the constants in gay and lesbian historical imaginings over the last 200 years.

One place in particular attracted the longings of gays and lesbians. This was the world of ancient Greece, a supposed gay paradise in which same-sex love flourished without discrimination. It was a powerful, captivating dream, one which scholars of ancient Greece have started to pull apart, revealing a culture in which homosexuality was much more regulated and controlled than previously thought.

Oscar Wilde tapped into this longing for a time and place free from moral censure in his famous “Love that Dare Not Speak Its Name” speech. The occasion of the speech was his criminal trial in April 1895 when Wilde was asked to explain the meaning of the seemingly incriminating phrase “the love that dare not speak its name”, a phrase which was found in the poetry of his companion, Alfred Douglas. Was this a coded reference to indecent passions, asked the prosecutor. Wilde’s response has become a classic of homosexual apologia:

“The love that dare not speak its name” in this century is such a great affection of an elder for a younger man as there was between David and Jonathan, such as Plato made the very basis of his philosophy, and such as you find in the sonnets of Michelangelo and Shakespeare. It is that deep, spiritual affection that is as pure as it is perfect … It is beautiful, it is fine, it is the noblest form of affection. There is nothing unnatural about it. It is intellectual, and it repeatedly exists between an elder and a younger man, when the elder man has intellect, and the younger man has all the joy, hope and glamour of life before him. That it should be so the world does not understand. The world mocks it and sometimes puts one in the pillory for it.

Oscar Wilde in 1882.
Wikimedia

In this spirited defense of same-sex love, Wilde created a genealogy of historical moments in which homosexual love had blossomed. He rewrote straight history and offered a different version of the past in which his own 19th-century passion joined a continuous tradition that stretched back to the very foundation of European civilization.

He sought to recover a love that time and prudish censors had tried to erase. From the days of the Old Testament through to the flourishing of culture in Greece and the Renaissance, Wilde sought to bear witness to a gay past of free romantic expression.

All roads lead to Greece

According to contemporary newspaper accounts, Wilde’s speech was greeted with loud and spontaneous applause from the courtroom’s gallery. Yet for all its brave defiance and elegant phrasing, there is little in it that is truly original. The rhetoric Wilde advanced had been in circulation for decades. Any educated homosexual in the 19th century could have given you a speech along much the same lines, citing the same canonical figures and possibly a few more. Wilde was tapping into a shared gay fantasy about the past, a fantasy in which one culture stood out above all others, the world of Classical Greece.

It is hard to overstate the affection with which 19th-century homosexuals like Wilde viewed the Greek world. Here was the utopia that they dreamed about – a place in which homosexuality was not only accepted, but celebrated. The legacy of this tradition was so potent that many felt even when visiting modern Greece that it was still possible to feel the traces of this passion.

In the warmth and light of the Mediterranean, numerous 19th- and early 20th-century gays and lesbians sought to fleetingly recapture visions of this lost paradise and recreate it amongst its ruins. Photographers such as Wilhelm von Gloeden and his cousin, Guglielmo Plüschow, working in Sicily staged local youths with props and poses that were designed to evoke this lost world.

Hypnos, Wilhelm von Gloeden, circa 1900.
Wikimedia

Looking at these images today, it is hard not to be struck by their sense of desperate, wilful escapism and rejection of the contemporary world and all that it offered, even as they used the latest photographic techniques in creating these tableaux. Quite what their Italian models thought of these odd Germans and their desire to dress them up in wreaths, togas, and splay their bodies on leopard skin rugs remains a mystery.

In a similar vein, numerous lesbians travelled to the Greek island of Lesbos. For many this was an act of pilgrimage arising from a desire to visit the home of Sappho, the archaic poet whose passionate, lyrical evocations of female same-sex desire became so famous in antiquity and beyond that women who were sexually attracted to other women came to be named after her island home – a nomenclature that not even a legal action by outraged inhabitants of the island can stop.

The Anglo-French poet Renée Vivien and her lover the American heiress Natalie Barney tried to set up an artist’s colony on Lesbos in 1904. It was ultimately unsuccessful. Vivien then retreated to Paris where she held wild salons instead, complete with replica Greek temples and recitations of Sappho’s poetry.

Renee Vivien in 1895.
Wikimedia

This legacy continued well into the 20th century, so much so that the homosexuality of the Greeks probably counts as one of Western culture’s worst kept secrets. Every time that the legal rights of gays and lesbians have been discussed, somebody will evoke the Greeks.

Indeed, the association between Greece and homosexuality is so strong that even anti-same-sex marriage advocates are not above using it to support their arguments. In the US Supreme Court case that legalised same-sex marriage, one of the dissenting judges, Justice Samuel Alito noted that while the Greeks and Romans approved of homosexual relations, they never created an institution of same-sex marriage. In his opinion, the only conclusion to draw was that the Ancients must have regarded same-sex marriage as an institution that would cause harm to society.

We have seen the same argument used against same-sex marriage in Australia. Both former senator Bill O’Chee and Dr John Dickson, the founding director of the Centre for Public Christianity have run similar arguments about the absence of same-sex marriage amongst the Greeks.

Not such a paradise after all

It goes without saying that the arguments offered by Justice Alito and his followers are deeply flawed. There are numerous institutions which the Greeks and Roman would have resisted (the right of women to vote, for example) that even the most arch conservative must accept are a good idea. Nevertheless, these arguments do point to some of the dangers of relying on an overly romantic view of the Greeks and their attitudes to same-sex love.

The Greek attitude to same-sex attraction was not nearly as permissive or free as many have assumed. Any idealised view of the Greeks falls apart the moment one remembers – and yet how easy it seems to be to forget – that ancient Greece was a society where slave-ownership was prevalent and that slaves were regularly sexually exploited by their masters. Yes, the Greeks tolerated same-sex attraction, but they also tolerated the violent sexual abuse of men and women in a manner that nobody could countenance today.

Sappho, Charles Mengin, 1877.
Wikimedia

Even amongst free-born men, Greek same-sex courtship was highly regulated. Older men pursued younger boys, and it is hard not to see an inherent power imbalance in such relationships, even if the older man is completely smitten. There were elaborate protocols regulating the process of seduction. There were rules about the kinds of wooing gifts that could be used. Dried fish and fighting cocks were the ancient homosexual equivalent of flowers and chocolates.

Boys should not appear too eager. For the suitors there was a fine line to walk between looking keen and looking like a besotted fool. Violating these rules lead to social death: slut-shaming seems to be a universal human tendency. We have numerous accounts of same-sex affairs that go badly resulting in murder and suicide. In one case, a disappointed lover hanged himself at the door of the boy who rejected him. In another case, one man tried to murder another over the affections of a slave boy.

We know very little about the lives of same-sex attracted women in Greece. Our best evidence remains the fragments of poems of Sappho that have come down to us. Yet even here, the picture is not entirely rosy. Sappho’s poems are often tinged with melancholy over love rejected or made impossible through forced marriage.

Love among the gods

Myths relating to homosexual love also rarely end well. One of the foundational myths for the establishment of same-sex love in Greece concerns the legendary figure of Orpheus. This musician is best known for descending into the underworld in an ultimately unsuccessful attempt to retrieve his wife Eurydice from the clutches of death.

What is less well-known is that following this attempt, he gave up entirely on women and instead turned his attention to young men. Indeed, he was so successful in proselytising for homosexuality that he upset the local female followers of Dionysus, the god of wine and drama. Outraged at Orpheus’ rejection of women they tore apart the musician and dismembered his body, throwing his head into the nearby Hebrus river where even in death it miraculously continued to sing.

Passion, jealousy and death are repeated motifs in Greek homosexual myths. The god Apollo’s beloved Hyacinth was killed when a jealous lover, the wind-god Zephyrus, diverted a discus into the skull of the young man. Out of the blood that was spilt grew the first hyacinth. It is a tragic, moving story that deserves to be better known. Oscar Wilde popularised the green carnation as a symbol of homosexuality visibility. It is high time to do the same for the hyacinth and rescue the bulb from its dowdy fusty retirement-home image and make it fabulous again.

The death of Hyacinth, Giovanni Battista Tiepolo, circa 1723.
Wikimedia

Even being the strongest man in the world can’t ensure the safety of your loved ones. Hercules lost his boyfriend Hylas to some conniving nymphs who drowned the boy in a pool. The hero was so distraught at the loss of his lover that he abandoned the quest for the Golden Fleece. Hercules’ other male lovers didn’t fare much better. Sostratus died young. Abderus was consumed by man-eating horses.

Love and strife

These myths point to an ambivalence that runs through Greek society about same-sex attraction. Male same-sex relationships attracted particular care and supervision in the Greek world because the freedoms that men, unlike women, enjoyed meant that there was always greater potential for things to go wrong. If left to get out of control, passions could have tragic consequences. It is little wonder that thinkers like Plato turn out to have an ambiguous relationship towards same-sex relationships.

Sometimes Plato seems to regard same-sex couples as the very pinnacle of the ideal relationship. In Plato’s Symposium, one of the speakers, Aristophanes, sketches out a vision of same-sex love which closely approximates modern notions of companionate relationships, a place where equals meet and their love completes each other. It is a beautiful vision, but one that seems to be more of a thought-experiment than a reflection of lived reality in ancient Athens.

Out of Hyacinth’s spilled blood grew the first hyacinth.
Shutterstock.com

At other points, such as in his Laws, Plato is dismissive of same-sex relations, regarding them as unnatural and not fit for proper society.

The picture of same-sex relations that we get from Greece is a complicated one. Nevertheless, all the efforts undertaken by the Greeks to regulate these relationships does challenge us to consider why societies are so frightened by love, not only gay, but straight desire also. What is it about this emotion that causes a culture to attempt to reign it in through complicated systems of courtship or invent a series of myths to scare you about committing yourself too completely to someone?

Studying attitudes to same-sex love amongst the ancient Greeks is a salutary reminder that there is a difference between history and nostalgia, and it is dangerous to confuse them. No longer looking at the Greeks through the rose-coloured lens of escapist wish-fulfillment reveals a culture that is complex and diverse in its attitudes and behaviours. The Greeks become a little more disappointing, but also more real. There are lessons to be learnt, but they do not come from imitation. A gay utopia may be possible, but it is a project for the future, not a lost relic of the past.

Monday: From reproducers to ‘flutters’ to ‘sluts’: tracing attitudes to women’s pleasure in Australia

The Conversation

Alastair Blanshard does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organisation that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment.

Source: http://ift.tt/10p9N0X

Aperture’s Holiday Gift Guide

This year, Aperture publications have explored how fashion photography can serve as a vehicle for social change, how photography empowers transgender communities, the black dandy movement, our relationship to food, and more. From iconic monographs by master photographers, to groundbreaking, never-before-published work, we offer titles for everyone on your holiday list.

For the Collector

 

Intimate Distance: Twenty-five Years of Photographs, A Chronological Album
Intimate Distance is the first comprehensive monograph charting the career of acclaimed American photographer Todd Hido. Though he has published many smaller individual bodies of work, this book gathers his most iconic images for the first time and brings a fresh perspective to his oeuvre with the inclusion of many unpublished photographs.

 

Illuminance Limited-Edition Box Set
Rinko Kawauchi’s work has frequently been lauded for its nuanced palette and offhand compositional mastery, as well as its ability to incite wonder through careful attention to tiny gestures and the incidental details of her everyday environment. In Illuminance, Kawauchi continues her exploration of the extraordinary in the mundane. This limited-edition boxed set includes a specially bound copy of the artist’s monograph Illuminance (Aperture, 2011) and two beautiful prints of images found in the book, all presented in a clothbound case.

 

Stephen Shore: Selected Works, 1973–1981
Stephen Shore’s Uncommon Places is a canonic body of work—a touchstone for those interested in photography and the American landscape. Remarkably, this series of photographs has yet to be explored in its entirety. Over the past five years, Shore has scanned hundreds of negatives shot between 1973 and 1981. In this volume, Aperture has invited an international group of fifteen photographers, curators, authors, and cultural figures to select ten images apiece from this rarely seen cache of images.

 

John Chiara: California
John Chiara creates his own cameras and chemical processes in order to make unique photographs that use the direct exposure of light onto reversal film and paper. Each resulting image is a singular, luminous object. This highly anticipated first book includes the surreal and thrilling landscape and architectural photographs for which the artist has become known. John Chiara: California features pictures taken in the artist’s hometown of San Francisco and other locations along the Pacific Coast.


Great Storytelling

The Notion of Family
Now available in a paperback edition, LaToya Ruby Frazier’s award-winning first book, The Notion of Family, offers an incisive exploration of the legacy of racism and economic decline in America’s small towns, as embodied by her hometown of Braddock, Pennsylvania.

Jonas Bendiksen: The Last Testament
Imagined as a sequel to the Old and New Testaments of the Bible, The Last Testament features visual accounts and stories of seven men around the world who claim to be the Second Coming of Jesus Christ.


Susan Meiselas: On the Frontline
Susan Meiselas, one of the most influential photographers of our time and an important contributor to the evolution of documentary storytelling, provides an insightful personal commentary on the trajectory of her career.


Tabitha Soren: Fantasy Life
In 2002, Tabitha Soren began photographing a group of minor league draft picks for the Oakland A’s. Fifteen years after that first shoot, Fantasy Life portrays a selection of these stories, gathering together a richly textured series of photographs taken on the field and behind the scenes at games, along with commentaries by each of the players and memorabilia from their lives.


Intersectional Inspirational


Future Gender
The Winter 2017 issue of Aperture magazine is dedicated to the representation of transgender lives, communities, and histories in photography. Guest edited by Zackary Drucker, the artist, activist, and producer of the acclaimed television series Transparent, “Future Gender” considers how trans and gender-nonconforming individuals have used photography to imagine new expressions of social and personal identity, from the nineteenth century to today.

Muse: Mickalene Thomas Photographs
Mickalene Thomas, known for her large-scale, multi-textured, and rhinestone-encrusted paintings of domestic interiors and portraits, identifies the photographic image as a defining touchstone for her practice. Thomas’s portraits draw equally from 1970s black-is-beautiful images of women such as supermodel Beverly Johnson and actress Vonetta McGee to Édouard Manet’s odalisque figures.

On Feminism
The winter 2016 issue of Aperture, “On Feminism,” focuses on intergenerational dialogues, debates, and strategies of feminism in photography, and considers the immense contributions by artists whose work articulates or interrogates representations of women in media and society. Across more than one hundred years of photographs and images, “On Feminism” underscores how photography has shaped feminism as much as how feminism has shaped photography.


Question Bridge: Black Males in America
Question Bridge assembles a series of questions posed to black men, by and for other black men, along with the corresponding responses and portraits of the participants. The questions range from the comic to the sublimely philosophical: from “Am I the only one who has problems eating chicken, watermelon, and bananas in front of white people?” to “Why is it so difficult for black American men in this culture to be themselves, their essential selves, and remain who they truly are?”


Wanderlust


Highway Kind
Since 2004, Justine Kurland, known for her utopian photographs of American landscapes and their fringe communities, and her young son, Casper, have traveled in their customized van, going south in the winter and north in the summer. Her life as an artist and mother is finely balanced between the need for routine and the desire for freedom and surprise. Kurland’s deep interest in the road, the western frontier, escape, and living outside mainstream values pervade this stunning and important body of work.


The Open Road: Photography and the American Road Trip
The road trip is an enduring symbol in American culture. As photographers have embarked on trips across the United States with the express purpose of making work, they have created some of the most important photographs in the history of the medium: from images by Walker Evans, Henri Cartier-Bresson, and Berenice Abbott to Robert Frank’s 1950s odyssey, The Americans. From Stephen Shore to Ryan McGinley, hundreds of other photographers have continued the tradition. The Open Road is the first book to explore the photographic road trip as a genre.


This Is Mars: Midi Edition

This Is Mars offers a thrilling visual experience of the surface of the red planet. The award-winning French editor and designer Xavier Barral has chosen and composed images, drawn from the comprehensive photographic map of Mars made by the U.S. observation satellite MRO (Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter), to revel in the wonder of Mars.


Foodie


Feast for the Eyes: The Story of Food in Photography
From basic sustenance to savory repasts, food awakens the senses and touches both private and public life. This is the first book to cover food photography’s rich history—not only in fine art photography, but also in crossover genres such as commercial and scientific photography and photojournalism.


The Photographer’s Cookbook
Playing off George Eastman’s famous recipe for lemon meringue pie, as well as former director Beaumont Newhall’s love of food, the cookbook grew from the idea that photographers’ talent in the darkroom must also translate into special skills in the kitchen. An extensive and distinctive archive of recipes and photographs are published in The Photographer’s Cookbook for the first time.


Downtown Kid


Lyle Ashton Harris: Today I Shall Judge Nothing That Occurs
Throughout the late 1980s and early 1990s, a radical cultural scene emerged in cities across the globe, finding expression in the galleries, nightclubs, and bedrooms of New York, London, Los Angeles, and Rome. In Lyle Ashton Harris: Today I Shall Judge Nothing That Occurs, the artist’s archive of 35 mm Ektachrome images are presented alongside journal entries and recollections by contributors such as Vince Aletti, Rashid Johnson, and Sarah Lewis.


Manhattan Sunday
Drawing heavily on personal experience, Richard Renaldi captures that ethereal moment when Saturday night bleeds into Sunday morning across the borough of Manhattan. This collection of portraits, landscapes, and club interiors evokes the vibrant nighttime rhythms of a city that persists in both its decadence and its dreams.


The Ballad of Sexual Dependency
The Ballad of Sexual Dependency is a visual diary chronicling the struggle for intimacy and understanding between friends, family, and lovers—collectively described by Goldin as her “tribe.” Her work describes a world that is visceral, charged, and seething with life. First published in 1986, this reissue recognizes the persistent relevance and freshness of Nan Goldin’s cutting-edge photography.


Peter Hujar: Speed of Life
Underappreciated during his lifetime, Peter Hujar is now a revered icon of the downtown art scene. He is best-known for his portraits of New York City’s artists, musicians, writers, and performers, which feature characters such as Susan Sontag, William S. Burroughs, David Wojnarowicz, and Andy Warhol. Hujar and was admired for his completely uncompromising attitude toward work and life.


Inner Child/Actual Child


Seeing Things, A Kid’s Guide to Looking at Photographs
Aimed at children between the ages of nine and twelve, Seeing Things is a wonderful introduction to photography that asks how photographers transform ordinary things into meaningful moments. In this book, acclaimed and beloved photographer Joel Meyerowitz takes readers on a journey through the power and magic of photography.


The Martin Parr Coloring Book!
Photography and Pop-culture buffs, get out your crayons and colored pencils! Martin Parr’s colorful, tongue-in-cheek photographs—his comedy of contemporary manners—have been transformed into a coloring book.


Go Photo!
Go Photo! features twenty-five hands-on and creative activities inspired by photography. Aimed at children between eight and twelve years old, this playful and fun collection of projects encourages young readers to experiment with their imaginations, get messy with materials, and engage with the world in new and exciting ways.


Nature Lover


A Wild Life: A Visual Biography of Photographer Michael Nichols
A Wild Life is Michael “Nick” Nichols’s story, told with passion and insight by author and photo-editor Melissa Harris. Nichols’ story combines a life of adventure, with a conviction about how we can redeem the human race by protecting our wildlife.


Picturing America’s National Parks
Picturing America’s National Parks brings together some of the finest landscape photography, from America’s most magnificent and sacred environments. Photography has played an integral role in both the formation of the National Parks and in the depiction of America itself. This book traces that history and delights readers with stunning photographs of the best American landscapes.


Cape Light
Cape Light, Joel Meyerowitz’s series of serene and contemplative color photographs taken on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, quickly became one of the most influential and popular photography books in the latter part of the twentieth century. Now, over thirty-five years later, Aperture is pleased to bring back this classic collection in its original form.


Fashion Forward


Fashion Photography: The Story in 180 Pictures
Fashion photography captures our desires and fantasies about how we present ourselves to the world, while reflecting the changing values of our culture and society. Fashion Photography: The Story in 180 Pictures explores the profound influence that fashion photography has had over the past eight decades, presenting its evolution as a language, and a genre, while showcasing some of its most glamorous moments.


Dandy Lion: The Black Dandy and Street Style
Suits that pop with loud colors and dazzling patterns, complete with a nearly ubiquitous bowtie, define the style of the new “dandy.” Described as “high-styled rebels” by author Shantrelle P. Lewis, black men with a penchant for color and refined fashion ave gained popular attention in recent years. Lewis’s carefully curated selection of contemporary photographs surveys the movement across the globe, with all of the vibrant patterns, electrifying colors, and fanciful poses of this brilliant style subculture.


Louise Dahl-Wolfe
Louise Dahl-Wolfe opens a window onto the work of one of the most influential fashion photographers of the twentieth century. After being discovered by Edward Steichen and having her work exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, in 1937, Louise Dahl-Wolfe went on to revitalize the Hollywood portrait and invigorate fashion photography of the 1930s, ’40s, and ’50s.


Design Savvy


Rinko Kawauchi: Halo
In recent years, Rinko Kawauchi’s exploration of the cadences of the everyday has begun to swing farther afield. In Halo, Kawauchi expands this inquiry, this time with photographs of the southern coastal region of Izumo, in Shimane Prefecture and interweaving them with images from New Year celebrations in Hebei province, China, plus her ongoing fascination with the murmuration of birds along the coast of Brighton, England. Kawauchi mesmerizingly knits together cycles of time, implicit and subliminal patterns of nature, and human ritual.

The Many Lives of Erik Kessels
The Many Lives of Erik Kessels presents the highly anticipated first illustrated survey of this pioneering and influential curator, editor, and artist whose varied experiments with photography and photographic archives reconsider the medium’s vernacular and narrative possibilities in today’s inundated image landscape.

 

Self Publish, Be Happy: A DIY Photobook Manual and Manifesto
An economic and cultural revolution has shaken the photobook world in the last five years: self-publishing. An army of photographers operating as publishers have had an instrumental role in today’s photobook renaissance. This book offers a do-it-yourself manual and a survey of key examples of self-published success stories, as well as a self-publishing manifesto and list of resources.


Classic Cat


Bruce Davidson: Survey
This survey focuses on the work that has made Bruce Davidson one of the most influential documentary photographers to this day. In his work, Davidson prizes his relationship to the subject above all else. From his profound documentation of the civil rights movement to his in-depth study of one derelict block in Harlem, he has immersed himself fully in his projects.


Elliot Erwitt: Home Around the World
Elliott Erwitt: Home Around the World offers a timely and critical reconsideration of Erwitt’s unparalleled life as a photographer. Produced alongside a major retrospective exhibition, the book features examples of Erwitt’s early experiments in California, intimate family portraits in New York, major magazine assignments, long-term documentary interests, and ongoing, personal investigations of public spaces.


Lisette Model
Lisette Model is an unsurpassed introduction to one of the twentieth century’s most significant photographers—a woman whose searing images and eloquent teachings deeply influenced her students who included Diane Arbus, Larry Fink, and many others.

The post Aperture’s Holiday Gift Guide appeared first on Aperture Foundation NY.

Source: https://aperture.org

Paint Colors For The Merc!!

Let’s get painting now, everyone is learning how, come on and get painting with meeeeeeeee! (I literally don’t know why everytime I sat down to write this post that song pops into my head, maybe because the Beach Boys were on Full House this week? But you know, painting instead of surfing because I’m not on a beach-also no coordination.

Are you guys ready to dive into the world of painting at the Merc?!!  Let me begin by saying that once the paint was on the walls it finally started to feel like our house. It’s crazy to look back and see how much it changed from when we started. This huge open room with no walls and oh so much potential! Painting is where our lives started to get really crazy. Most of the work from the subs is over, its now up to us to bring this puppy over the finish line!

When it comes to picking out paint, I could do it in my sleep, in fact I bet if you called my local Sherwin-Williams store and asked for Mandi’s usual they’d know exactly what colors and type to get. If you’ve followed VR for any length of time you know that I have my go to tried and true that I’ve used on every room I’ve gotten my hands on since 2013 (THAT IS CRAZY!!!!) So if you’re looking for the perfect white, have a seat my friend and let’s chat.

To me the perfect white is just white. Not yellowish, not bluish, not grayish, just white. Its not too bright or too dingy, its JUST WHITE. At my local store its called Mandi White (if you’re in St. George you can go into any of the stores and they’ll mix it up for you!) The formula is extra white base with 3 oz of white pigment added. After 4 years of calling it Mandi White I asked Sherwin Sensei Sam (the manager that answers all of my weird questions) if this was a real Sherwin color and they we’re just humoring me and calling it Mandi White (you know, like when someone calls you by the wrong name for so long that you can’t correct them and will eternally be Mindy when you’re around them?) This is what he said. There is in fact NOT a color with the same formula (YAY!! Who wants to start a petition to have Mandi White added to their official list of colors!?!) But the closest “real color” is Pure White SW 7005. With Pure White they add a little bit of black to the extra white base to grey it out a teeny bit. With Mandi White the white pigment does sort of the same thing, its just a touch brighter.

So back to the Merc, like I said before, Mandi White was a complete no brainer for all of the walls and baseboard. Same with using Tricorn Black for the accents. I’ve used it so many times that there are no surprises here. BUT I did venture out to a new color that I’d never used before and i’m pretty thrilled about it -dun dun dun dun dun duuuuuuun- Jasper.

Here’s a side by side with Jasper and Tricorn Black

Before we go deeper into that let me tell you why I was so drawn to it. When we were touring the Merc for the first time I noticed these green boards stacked in a back room as well as spots of green hanging out other places (like the pass through window in the kitchen). When I asked about it, the previous owner told me the cutest historical story about Southern Utah. When the pioneers had finished building the temple they ordered paint to cover the red sandstone that it was built out of. White for the walls and green for the roof. When the paint arrived there was wayyyyy more green and not enough white, so the church passed it out to whomever wanted it to paint their gates/houses and ordered more white. I’m not sure if the green paint at the Merc is temple paint but isn’t that the most endearing story?! From that moment forward I knew if I was going to use color, it needed to be green, so it was constantly in the back of my mind.

Enter Jasper. When I saw this almost black inky green I knew it was meant for the Merc. We’re using it on our front doors and kitchen cabinets, and if we’re being totally honest I wanted to use it on all of the interior doors as well but decided against it because I didn’t want to overuse it. It feels like the cabs and front doors will be the perfect amount of green. And so far that’s it! Mandi White, Tricorn Black, and Jasper. I’m sure I’ll end up with other colors once we’re moved in and the decorating begins but for now I’m really digging the historic vibe this palette is throwing off.

Tomorrow we’re talking practical application. See you then!!

 

 

 

 

 

The post Paint Colors For The Merc!! appeared first on Vintage Revivals.

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Shiba-inu Geoglyph Made Entirely From Natural Materials

With just about 2 weeks before Japan welcomes in 2019, the new year of the dog, Hitachi Seaside Park in Ibaraki Prefecture has unveiled an enormous geoglyph of a Shiba-inu and 2 pups. The large sculpture measures 23 x 27 meters (75 x 89 ft) and is made from natural elements found in the park […]

Source: http://ift.tt/zlrR8Y

Shiba-inu Geoglyph Made Entirely From Natural Materials

With just about 2 weeks before Japan welcomes in 2019, the new year of the dog, Hitachi Seaside Park in Ibaraki Prefecture has unveiled an enormous geoglyph of a Shiba-inu and 2 pups. The large sculpture measures 23 x 27 meters (75 x 89 ft) and is made from natural elements found in the park […]

Source: http://ift.tt/zlrR8Y

Snap launches free AR tool for creating Snapchat lenses

The Lens Studio website

Snap is the latest tech company to reveal its AR offering with Lens Studio: a free desktop tool that allows users to create lenses for Snapchat.

Google, Apple and Facebook have all launched or announced AR platforms this year: Apple’s ARKit launched on iOS 11 in September, Facebook opened up its AR Studio tool to developers this week and Google has introduced an AR Stickers app – created using its ARCore platform – on its Pixel 2 smartphone. (A wider release of ARCore is expected next year.)

Lens Studio allows individual users as well as brands and advertisers to create lenses for Snapchat. The tool can be used to create ‘world lenses’, which are triggered via the rear-view camera, and ‘face lenses’, which are triggered via the front facing camera and appear on users’ faces (think bunny ears and giant tongues).

Only brands and advertisers working with approved partner agencies can create face lenses but world lenses can be created by anyone. Creators can then publish and share lenses using Snapcodes.

The Lens Studio website also includes templates and ‘how to’ guides explaining how to create static and animated objects. In a statement announcing the launch of Lens Studio, Snap said it wanted to make lenses more accessible to creators and more diverse.

The company plans to launch a series of AR challenges throughout 2018 – the first invites creators to come up with a lens “that will bring New Years’ spirit to anyone who plays with it”. The company is offering an iPad Pro and “swag bag” to the creator of the winning Lens (see the Lens Studio website for details).

Lenses were introduced in 2015. Snap claims that 70 million users – one third of its community – now interact with them each day. The company introduced geo-specific lenses in September, including a dancing foam finger which can be unlocked at NBA arenas in the US and Jeff Koons lenses which were made available at Miami Art Week. Snap has also been working with Apple to create lenses using ARKit and revealed a “portal” lens which placed users inside a set from Netflix series Stranger Things back in October.

You can download Lens Studio or find out more at lensstudio.snapchat.com 

The post Snap launches free AR tool for creating Snapchat lenses appeared first on Creative Review.

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‘Salt Years,’ Explores Sigalit Landau’s Lifetime Relationship With the Dead Sea

Israeli artist Sigalit Landau (previously) has a practice that is deeply tied to working with the Dead Sea. Landau uses the hypersaline body of water as both a photographic backdrop and medium to suspend everyday objects, creating densely salt-encrusted sculptures. The items she chooses for her pieces are sometimes simply based on their textures and shapes, while others are chosen in order to filter memories that have been passed down to the artist through her parents and grandparents.

“These objects leave ‘the game’ of being useful ‘things’ and enter a new realm – the open space of representation,” said Landau to Colossal. “They loose their old features and dimensions and inhale a certain pureness of spirit, treated by climate and enhanced by emotion.”

A new book titled Salt Years, explores Landau’s process, bringing a new perspective to her salt crystal sculptures, video art, and images created over the last 15 years. Within the book Landau explores her process of “baptizing” objects in the Dead Sea’s waters, showcasing how the salt-filled sea breathes new life into the inanimate works through behind-the-scenes photos, and personal notes and essays.

You can pre-order the 288-page book through Landau’s Indiegogo campaign, and follow its progress through the book’s Facebook.

Source: http://ift.tt/odnItH

‘Salt Years,’ Explores Sigalit Landau’s Lifetime Relationship With the Dead Sea

Israeli artist Sigalit Landau (previously) has a practice that is deeply tied to working with the Dead Sea. Landau uses the hypersaline body of water as both a photographic backdrop and medium to suspend everyday objects, creating densely salt-encrusted sculptures. The items she chooses for her pieces are sometimes simply based on their textures and shapes, while others are chosen in order to filter memories that have been passed down to the artist through her parents and grandparents.

“These objects leave ‘the game’ of being useful ‘things’ and enter a new realm – the open space of representation,” said Landau to Colossal. “They loose their old features and dimensions and inhale a certain pureness of spirit, treated by climate and enhanced by emotion.”

A new book titled Salt Years, explores Landau’s process, bringing a new perspective to her salt crystal sculptures, video art, and images created over the last 15 years. Within the book Landau explores her process of “baptizing” objects in the Dead Sea’s waters, showcasing how the salt-filled sea breathes new life into the inanimate works through behind-the-scenes photos, and personal notes and essays.

You can pre-order the 288-page book through Landau’s Indiegogo campaign, and follow its progress through the book’s Facebook.

Source: http://ift.tt/odnItH