More Passport Antarctica Love

Last week we released the first Antarctica video exclusively for Passport Members. In this one, you see me in survival training, digging an ice cave, and getting rested up for some photography the next day!

More Antarctica Photos

And staying in the spirit of it, here are some more favorite photos from Antarctica!

The Smoothness Of Antarctica

a silly place where penguins would steal rocks and orcas would eat penguins

Alone in the Vast Expanse of Antarctica

Hacking through the Ice

Minecraft: Antarctica Edition

And here you go, enjoy!

Exclusive content for Passport members

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Poem of the Day: As

As naught gives way to aught
and oxhide gives way to chain mail
and byrnie gives way to battle-ax
and Cavalier gives way to Roundhead
and Cromwell Road gives way to the Connaught
and I Am Curious (Yellow) gives way to I Am Curious (Blue)
and barrelhouse gives way to Frank’N’Stein
and a pint of Shelley plain to a pint of India Pale Ale   
I give way to you.
As bass gives way to baritone
and hammock gives way to hummock
and Hoboken gives way to Hackensack
and bread gives way to reed bed
and bald eagle gives way to Theobald Wolfe Tone   
and the Undertones give way to Siouxsie Sioux   
and DeLorean, John, gives way to Deloria, Vine,   
and Pierced Nose to Big Stomach
I give way to you.
As vent gives way to Ventry
and the King of the World gives way to Finn MacCool   
and phone gives way to fax
and send gives way to sned
and Dagenham gives way to Coventry
and Covenanter gives way to caribou
and the caribou gives way to the carbine
and Boulud’s cackamamie to the cock-a-leekie of Boole   
I give way to you.
As transhumance gives way to trance
and shaman gives way to Santa
and butcher’s string gives way to vacuum pack   
and the ineffable gives way to the unsaid   
and pyx gives way to monstrance
and treasure aisle gives way to need-blind pew   
and Calvin gives way to Calvin Klein
and Town and Country Mice to Hanta   
I give way to you.
As Hopi gives way to Navaho
and rug gives way to rag
and Pax Vobiscum gives way to Tampax
and Tampa gives way to the water bed
and The Water Babies gives way to Worstward Ho
and crapper gives way to loo
and spruce gives way to pine
and the carpet of pine needles to the carpetbag   
I give way to you.
As gombeen-man gives way to not-for-profit   
and soft soap gives way to Lynn C. Doyle   
and tick gives way to tack
and Balaam’s Ass gives way to Mister Ed
and Songs of Innocence gives way to The Prophet
and single-prop Bar-B-Q gives way to twin-screw   
and the Salt Lick gives way to the County Line   
and “Mending Wall” gives way to “Build Soil”   
I give way to you.
As your hummus gives way to your foul madams   
and your coy mistress gives way to “The Flea”
and flax gives way to W. D. Flackes   
and the living give way to the dead
and John Hume gives way to Gerry Adams   
and Television gives way to U2
and Lake Constance gives way to the Rhine   
and the Rhine to the Zuider Zee   
I give way to you.
As dutch treat gives way to french leave   
and spanish fly gives way to Viagra   
and slick gives way to slack
and the local fuzz give way to the Feds   
and Machiavelli gives way to make-believe
and Howards End gives way to A Room with a View
and Wordsworth gives way to “Woodbine
Willie” and stereo Nagra to quad Niagara   
I give way to you.
As cathedral gives way to cavern
and cookie cutter gives way to cookie
and the rookies give way to the All-Blacks   
and the shad give way to the smoke shed
and the roughshod give way to the Black Horse avern
that still rings true
despite that T being missing from its sign   
where a little nook gives way to a little nookie   
when I give way to you.
That Nanook of the North should give way to Man of Aran
as ling gives way to cod
and cod gives way to kayak
and Camp Moosilauke gives way to Club Med   
and catamite gives way to catamaran
and catamaran to aluminum canoe
is symptomatic of a more general decline   
whereby a cloud succumbs to a clod
and I give way to you.
For as Monet gives way to Juan Gris
and Juan Gris gives way to Joan Miró
and Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer gives way to Miramax
and the Volta gives way to Travolta, swinging the red-hot lead,   
and Saturday Night Fever gives way to Grease
and the Greeks give way to you know who
and the Roman IX gives way to the Arabic 9
and nine gives way, as ever, to zero
I give way to you.
Paul Muldoon, “As” from Moy Sand and Gravel. Copyright © 2002 by Paul Muldoon. Used by permission of Farrar, Straus & Giroux, LLC, http://ift.tt/1qc5Is0. All rights reserved.

Source: Moy Sand and Gravel(Farrar Straus and Giroux, 2002)

Paul Muldoon

Biography
More poems by this author

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Art Quote of the Day

Art Quote of the Day: “Most artists like to think of themselves as rugged individualists, as independent characters.” – Jack Levine “Most artists like to think of themselves as rugged individualists, as independent characters.” Source: BrainyQuote http://ift.tt/2yHifQf

“Broken” by INO in Fortaleza, Brazil

Greek artist INO was invited to paint in the 4th edition of Festival Concreto  that happened in Fortaleza city, Brazil.

A place that anyone can see very large contradictions, the poverty in the street, people begging for food while you eat at the restaurant, the prostitutes every night on the streets. All these mix together with the luxury, the expensive apartments in huge buildings that look empty, the barbwires on the fences of each condominium yard.

Known for his provocative images and after he was given a wall of a luxury hotel (51m high), INO had the chance to emphasise the phenomenon of prostitution. He painted a picture of a naked thin woman on a position of offering her body with a black splash coming out of her head and named it “Broken”. Because of the strong sun, INO was also working at night. Every night under the building, there were women selling their body. (photo from the lift attached)

The post “Broken” by INO in Fortaleza, Brazil appeared first on StreetArtNews.

Source: http://ift.tt/2ff4Qa9

“Broken” by INO in Fortaleza, Brazil

Greek artist INO was invited to paint in the 4th edition of Festival Concreto  that happened in Fortaleza city, Brazil.

A place that anyone can see very large contradictions, the poverty in the street, people begging for food while you eat at the restaurant, the prostitutes every night on the streets. All these mix together with the luxury, the expensive apartments in huge buildings that look empty, the barbwires on the fences of each condominium yard.

Known for his provocative images and after he was given a wall of a luxury hotel (51m high), INO had the chance to emphasise the phenomenon of prostitution. He painted a picture of a naked thin woman on a position of offering her body with a black splash coming out of her head and named it “Broken”. Because of the strong sun, INO was also working at night. Every night under the building, there were women selling their body. (photo from the lift attached)

The post “Broken” by INO in Fortaleza, Brazil appeared first on StreetArtNews.

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Getting Your Feet Wet: A Guest Contribution from Andy Bertolini

Andy Bertolini: The man who solves all your problems on time, on budget, and at the highest quality.

This is a guest contribution coming to us from Andy Bertolini. Having recently worked at Anki, and at Somatone before that, Andy is a fantastic Voice Over editor also deft in the arts of audio middleware. He has been the person who has solved our problems before we were aware they even existed, and we couldn’t have shipped our latest title without him.


A Newcomer’s Journey into Game Audio

I would like to imagine that many of us, if not almost all of us, have at some point asked ourselves: What do I want to do? Who do I want to be? And where do I want to work? That being said, they are not always the most easily answered questions. I personally had quite a bit of difficulty doing just that. Growing up, I was never the type of person that aspired to a specific “dream job.” There were two things that I knew I wanted to work with: Audio and Video Games. However, this introduced an entirely new layer of questions. Which discipline did I want to pursue and how should I approach getting into that field?

Our industry is an interesting one as it is comprised of many unique disciplines; recording, composing, programming, sound design, etc. As a relatively new audio professional, it was intimidating, overwhelming even, when contemplating what I wanted to specialize in. The Game Audio industry, like many others, has a wide spectrum of specialty subsets that I could focus on, but how could I decide? I’d like to talk about some of my personal experiences when trying to decide on a specialty and what factors came into play to mold my decisions.

As I said earlier, I’ve never had a particular affinity towards a specific discipline within the audio world; I only knew that I wanted to work in Game Audio. This made for a rather stressful period in my life filled with a large amount of soul searching and self-reflection. With such a large spectrum of potential disciplines, how could I feel comfortable specializing in just one? What if I chose poorly? What if I ultimately didn’t like the specialty?

So there I was, standing at a pivotal crossroads, attempting to make a decision that would ultimately shape the beginning of my professional career.

So there I was, standing at a pivotal crossroads, attempting to make a decision that would ultimately shape the beginning of my professional career.

It was then that I realized I needed information. I needed a starting point, and an avenue to ask questions.

The Hive Mind that is Subreddit

The beauty of the technological age we live in is that we have, at a moment’s notice, access to an infinite amount of information. In the hope of narrowing down such a large spectrum of potential careers, I started to focus on the individual bands that defined it: sound design, audio programming, and editing. My goal was to use the readily available information to explore each discipline while continuing to give myself the freedom to experiment.

I began by creating a Reddit account that would be dedicated to anything related to audio. As I scoured over endless amounts of content, I came across a handful of subreddits that offered a wealth of information:

  1. Game Audio: http://ift.tt/29pkxe8
  2. Audio Engineering: http://ift.tt/1Pu9a21
  3. GameDev: http://ift.tt/1hYBJaV
  4. Unity3D: http://ift.tt/1huSqK7
  5. Programming: http://ift.tt/10FGvRo
  6. SuperCollider: http://ift.tt/2j7ULhS

Each of these subs acted as a unique hub that offered varied points of view, information, and levels of community involvement. Furthermore, I could tailor my experience to fit my current needs and interests through engaging in discussions with audio hobbyists, enthusiasts, and professionals from all over the world. Conversely, if I wanted to, I could silently lurk and assimilate information on my own terms.

YouTube: Everyone’s Classroom

Having available access to a massive network of like-minded audio professionals, their advice, their work, their successes, and their failures, was a tremendous step towards gaining a better understanding of what resonated with me. However, I started to find myself lacking content that could actually teach me new tools and concepts.  Luckily, many Reddit users did an excellent job of linking me to external sites. It was here that I began exploring the depths of YouTube tutorials and podcasts. A few notable series that I frequented were:

  1. SuperCollider: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yRzsOOiJ_p4
  2. Reaper: http://ift.tt/2zgxFyn
  3. Reaper Blog: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC39aOXMqg48qpzEz1l_-7tQ

The beauty of the video tutorial is that even though it is linear by nature, you have dynamic transport controls. Did you miss what the YouTuber was saying because you were attempting to follow his instructions? Just hit rewind. Do you need to catch up to what they were talking about? Just press pause. With these tutorials, I was able to learn on my time and at my pace. And fortunately, with the vast expanse that is the internet, it was highly likely that there was a tutorial out there for just about anything I could imagine. That being said, there were instances where I wanted to take what I learned and expand upon it in real-world scenarios. It was here that I sought out mentors, co-workers, acquaintances, and friends.

Getting Personal

What better way to get a taste of what a specialty is like than by going straight to the source: a person that specializes in that discipline! Your colleagues, acquaintances, and friends are a massive pool of knowledge to draw from. The ability to have a conversation in real-time, to ask about a person’s workflow and technique, is one of the best learning opportunities you could hope for. Not only will they be able to explain what they did and how they did it, they can also give insight into the rationale behind why they did it.

Being new to the industry, I took advantage of every opportunity presented to me to ask as many questions as possible. These conversations allowed me to expand my understanding of their specialty while also deepening the relationship I had with them. If I could give any advice to new folks starting on their audio journey, I would say this: don’t be shy about asking questions outside your chosen specialty. Who knows, maybe those conversations will lead you to discover something you didn’t know before. But if the information isn’t the most relevant to you, don’t sweat it. You still are establishing a good perspective.

Some of the best advice I was given throughout my many years of academia was:

“Be unrelenting in your curiosity, insatiable in your thirst for knowledge, and above all else never stop asking questions. Curiosity is the path by which you expand your understanding of the world around you.”

“Be unrelenting in your curiosity, insatiable in your thirst for knowledge, and above all else never stop asking questions. Curiosity is the path by which you expand your understanding of the world around you.”

What started as a maelstrom of anxiety, stress, and impossible decisions transformed into an amazing opportunity to explore various avenues of learning. Being as inexperienced as I was in the professional audio world, I lacked the insight on how best to specialize when looking for work. This presented me with a unique opportunity as it forced me to explore and experiment with different specialties. I started by utilizing various web-based information hubs such as Reddit and YouTube to gain a greater understanding and appreciation of these disciplines. When those sources fell short, however, I turned to my colleagues with their decades of professional experience. They were a more personal and intimate source of information that allowed me to ask the plethora of questions I had rattling around my mind.

Looking back, now that I’m on the other side with a somewhat clearer idea of what I want to be, I’d like to say: Never stop asking questions, and never stop looking for the next thing you’re going to be great at. Just because you specialize in a certain discipline doesn’t mean you should stop looking forward. Our industry is a massive spectrum comprised of countless specialties; do not be afraid to wander. Never lose the curiosity, that initial spark of intrigue that originally got you into audio. Nurture it and feed it with as much information as humanly possible.

-Andy

 

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The Best of Documentary

Documentary photography is often used for reportage, as a way to chronicle important historical or cultural subject matter. By capturing a scene as accurately as possible, photographers tell uncontrived, real life stories through honest, objective visuals.

View some of our favorite documentary content from this past year.

The Coldest City in the World

Alex Vasilev’s photos of Yakutsk, located in Russia’s Far East region, capture the stark contrast between summer and winter in the world’s coldest city. As a native who still resides in Yakutsk, Alex documents the everyday life of his fellow citizens, who live in below freezing temperatures seven months of the year.

Read more

Image by lekon

Reindeer Races above the Arctic Circle

The Jokkmook Winter Market in Northern Sweden has been celebrated every February for over 400 years by the Sámi, the indigenous people of the region. Australian photojournalist Isabella Moore traveled to witness the traditional dress, folk dancing, and reindeer races that are a distinct part of the Sámi culture.

Read more

Image by helloisabellam

The Uttarayan Kite Festival

San Francisco photographer Nirav Patel returned to Gujarat, India, where he grew up, to capture the Uttarayan festival, a Hindu celebration of the transition from winter to spring. His photos capture the wonder and excitement of kite flyers battling for space in the sky.

Read more

Image by niravpatel

Minya Limestone Workers

Egyptian photographer Nader Saadallah documented limestone workers in Minya, Egypt.
Quarrying for limestone is dangerous work, with thick dust coating the air and sharp equipment running throughout the day.

Read more

Image by nadersaadallah

The Lives of Young, Buddhist Monks

Set in a remote location in China’s Sichuan province, the Geerdi Temple is home to young children who have been sent by their families to become monks. Ottmar Wu, who spent three days with the young monks, gives a glimpse into their lives.

Read more

Image by ottmarwu

Source: http://vsco.co/rss/blog

Rooftop Roads: Ancient Iranian Town Where Roofs Serve as Public Spaces [ARTICLE]

Nestled into the steep slope of a mountain, this remarkable thousand-year-old village in northern Iran has evolved an unusual approach to open space: its rooftops double as public lanes and gathering places.

Image of road entering town and joining roof by Hoomanb (CC BY 2.5)

At an elevation of nearly 3,500 feet, Masuleh sits high in the Alborz mountain range on a 60-degree incline. It was originally developed around an iron mine and became a hub for the ironwork industry.

Overlooking the town’s roof road network, image by Simon Helle Nielsen (CC BY 2.0)

Regional vernacular architecture uses stone, wood and adobe atop natural rock forming foundations and back walls of buildings. Old craft traditions continue to inform ornate and decorative facades.

Architectural detail and staircase with ramp mod, image by Petr Adam Dohnálek (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Stepping out of a building may mean walking onto a narrow stretch of rock, but in many cases leads straight to a rooftop. These serve as public walkways and plazas linked by narrow allies and staircases.

Village at night, image by Parastoo.Atrsaei (CC BY-SA 4.0)

In many respects, it’s a city planner’s paradise — a place where roof surfaces are fully used and integrated, and no space is wasted. Another appealing prospect to many urbanists: no cars are allowed, as these would strain the structural limits of supporting architecture.

“In its interconnectedness,” writes Zoya Gul Hasan, “it is reminiscent of the maze-like rooftops of the old town of Ghadames in northwestern Libya, but unlike Ghadames, the rooftops in Masuleh play an integral role in community interaction and friendly cohabitation.”

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The tree is up!

Over the weekend we brought home our Christmas tree. We could have brought home a taller tree but I think I prefer a medium-isa tree so that it doesn’t overwhelm the entire room. We used the ornaments I mentioned in last week’s post for 5 Days of Christmas and the kids did most of the work, they LOVE decorating the tree. I just go back after they’re in bed and move around a few ornaments that they doubled up on the same branch. Kids don’t care about symmetry but I let them put everything where they want and they haven’t noticed the move. 😉





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Photo Report: Roger W. Smith At The Horological Society Of New York

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On December 4, 2017, Roger W. Smith lectured at the Horological Society of New York (HSNY) on the development of practical watch escapements. The large crowd was enthusiastic to hear Smith speak and to meet him in person, with many attendees lining up after the lecture to ask for autographs and photos. This guy is a (humble) horological rockstar if there ever was one. 

A group of watchmaking students attended the lecture from both Rolex’s Lititz Watch Technicum in Pennsylvania and the Patek Philippe Watchmaking School here in New York City, and a handful of people flew in to NYC to attend the much-anticipated lecture. The Sunday before Smith’s lecture at HSNY, he guest instructed a special horological education class for six lucky students. The class was an opportunity for students to learn from one of the world’s leading watchmakers, over an afternoon in Brooklyn.

Roger W. Smith at the Horological Society of New York

Smith describing the functionality of the cylinder escapement.

<p>Smith speaking with attendees after his lecture.</p>

Smith speaking with attendees after his lecture.

<p>Watchmaking students from the Rolex and Patek Philippe schools being recognized before Smith's lecture.</p>

Watchmaking students from the Rolex and Patek Philippe schools being recognized before Smith’s lecture.

Roger W. Smith at the Horological Society of New York

Smith lecturing at the Horological Society of New York.

<p>Smith discussing escapement mechanics.</p>

Smith discussing escapement mechanics.

<p>Smith speaking with Tom Wilcox, Executive Director of the National Association of Watch &amp; Clock Collectors.</p>

Smith speaking with Tom Wilcox, Executive Director of the National Association of Watch & Clock Collectors.

Roger W. Smith at the Horological Society of New York

Smith lecturing at the Horological Society of New York.

Roger W. Smith at the Horological Society of New York

Smith wearing a Series 2 Open Dial watch.

Sunday, December 3, 2017: Horological Education Class In Brooklyn

Smith instructing a horological education class.

Smith instructing a horological education class.

<p>Smith demonstrating balance installation to the students.</p>

Smith demonstrating balance installation to the students.

<p>Smith instructing a horological education class.</p>

Smith instructing a horological education class.

Smith instructing a horological education class.

Smith assisting a student.

Bonus: Video Recording Of Smith’s Lecture

All HSNY lectures are video recorded and made available to HSNY members. For Smith’s lecture, HSNY has made the video recording available to the public. Enjoy!

For more information, visit the Horological Society of New York’s website.

HODINKEE is a sponsor of the Horological Society of New York.

Photographs by Atom Moore and Liam O’Donnell.

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