A Cathedral in the Clouds Surrounded by an Amusement Park


A Tibidabo Double-Play!

Today I’m showing two photos of the same place near Barcelona. It’s a beautiful cathedral called Tibidabo.

Daily Photo – A Cathedral in the Clouds Surrounded by an Amusement Park

So I like this second photo better. I obviously heavily processed it with one of my Lightroom Presets. I believe it was one of my “Sandstorm” ones from Burning Man. I think this place is beautiful, but I can’t figure out why they put an amusement park up there. It makes it all a bit garish, I think. Even in this photo, you can see part of a rollercoaster in the lower right. Oh, this second photo was taken with a DJI Phantom 4 Pro.

A Cathedral in the Clouds Surrounded by an Amusement Park

Photo Information

  • Date Taken2017-04-30 19:59:57
  • CameraFC6310
  • Camera MakeDJI
  • Exposure Time1/240
  • Aperture5
  • ISO100
  • Focal Length8.8 mm
  • FlashNo flash function
  • Exposure ProgramProgram AE
  • Exposure Bias


Source: http://ift.tt/2sX4vPC

A Cathedral in the Clouds Surrounded by an Amusement Park

A Tibidabo Double-Play!

Today I’m showing two photos of the same place near Barcelona. It’s a beautiful cathedral called Tibidabo.

Daily Photo – A Cathedral in the Clouds Surrounded by an Amusement Park

So I like this second photo better. I obviously heavily processed it with one of my Lightroom Presets. I believe it was one of my “Sandstorm” ones from Burning Man. I think this place is beautiful, but I can’t figure out why they put an amusement park up there. It makes it all a bit garish, I think. Even in this photo, you can see part of a rollercoaster in the lower right. Oh, this second photo was taken with a DJI Phantom 4 Pro.

A Cathedral in the Clouds Surrounded by an Amusement Park

Photo Information


  • Date Taken2017-04-30 19:59:57
  • CameraFC6310
  • Camera MakeDJI
  • Exposure Time1/240
  • Aperture5
  • ISO100
  • Focal Length8.8 mm
  • FlashNo flash function
  • Exposure ProgramProgram AE
  • Exposure Bias

Source: http://ift.tt/2sX4vPC

Group Tips

Today, a few group tips—an excerpt from my “Portrait Photography” book, whose thoird edition comes out soon.

Tips for posing the family and other groups.

  • Avoid straight lines: each head should be at a different vertical position.
  • Sit–stand–lean: Create a combination of sitting, standing and leaning to achieve this.
  • Avoid having people face the camera straight on; Place people at an angle.
  • Alternate those angles. See who fits with whom, both in terms of relationship and in terms of the “look” of the photo. For individuals, have them turn around and see what flatters them most.
  • Create little groups, by having people face each other, or stand back-to-back.
    “If it has a joint, it is meant to be bent”. Bend at the knees, elbows, wrists, whatever has a joint should be bent somehow,. This gives the photo a much more realistic look and feel.
  • If you have limited space, squeeze people in as much as you can.
  • If you are outside, have the sun in your group’s back, and light the front with flash or reflectors. Do not have your subjects face into the sun (wrinkles show, and people squint).
  • If at all possible, find an elevated position to shoot from. That way, you get a more dynamic picture and you get everyone in easily, without heads being hidden behind other heads.

See? Nothing to it!  🙂

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Flickr Friday – Let There Be Light

Last week’s Flickr Friday challenge involved getting the Flickr community to creatively portray the theme #LetThereBeLight. Some people took this the religious route, as evident in one of the photos below, while others used this as an opportunity to highlight some of their more brightly lit images. Either way, every submission was truly a well crafted piece of work.

Ladies Of The Lamplight

We always love it when photographers create their own virtual worlds in their photographs! Not only does it scream creativity, but it demonstrates knowledge far more vast than technical ability.

The framing in the shot below couldn’t have been more well executed. We love the horizontal length of the shot and how it really made this image stand out among the others. This image is just proof that you don’t need the best props, models or landscapes to make a well composed photograph.

My favourite things - blue

The photo below obviously had to be included in the gallery! Although the set up probably didn’t take longer than a minute, we appreciate the religious sentiment. This photo is absolutely heavenly.

Genesis 1:3

It’s important to remember that you can stray a bit away from the topic! By photographing a building that glimmers a certain way, you’re still fulfilling the theme! The theme is simply a guide to take your photos where they’ve never gone before. As long as they’re creative, they’re beautiful to us.

Let the light in...

For more images on light, make sure to check out the “Let There Be Light” gallery! If your photo didn’t make the cut this week, feel free to try again Monday by submitting your photo in the Flickr Friday group!

Source: http://blog.flickr.net

Flickr Friday – Let There Be Light

Last week’s Flickr Friday challenge involved getting the Flickr community to creatively portray the theme #LetThereBeLight. Some people took this the religious route, as evident in one of the photos below, while others used this as an opportunity to highlight some of their more brightly lit images. Either way, every submission was truly a well crafted piece of work.

Ladies Of The Lamplight

We always love it when photographers create their own virtual worlds in their photographs! Not only does it scream creativity, but it demonstrates knowledge far more vast than technical ability.

The framing in the shot below couldn’t have been more well executed. We love the horizontal length of the shot and how it really made this image stand out among the others. This image is just proof that you don’t need the best props, models or landscapes to make a well composed photograph.

My favourite things - blue

The photo below obviously had to be included in the gallery! Although the set up probably didn’t take longer than a minute, we appreciate the religious sentiment. This photo is absolutely heavenly.

Genesis 1:3

It’s important to remember that you can stray a bit away from the topic! By photographing a building that glimmers a certain way, you’re still fulfilling the theme! The theme is simply a guide to take your photos where they’ve never gone before. As long as they’re creative, they’re beautiful to us.

Let the light in...

For more images on light, make sure to check out the “Let There Be Light” gallery! If your photo didn’t make the cut this week, feel free to try again Monday by submitting your photo in the Flickr Friday group!

Source: http://blog.flickr.net

Is Petra Collins More than Screen Deep?

She’s celebrated for her raw and honest depiction of femininity. But can Petra Collins speak for all young women?

By Gideon Jacobs

Petra Collins was five years old, in 1998, when Britney Spears’s “. . . Baby One More Time” was released. She was seven when Survivor first aired. She was almost eleven when Paris Hilton’s sex tape went public (conveniently, just a few weeks before Hilton’s television debut in The Simple Life), and eleven when Facebook launched. She was fourteen when Pornhub launched. She was seventeen when Instagram launched. She was nineteen when Kodak declared bankruptcy.

Collins’s generation—of which I’m a slightly older member—grew up in a cultural era defined by a potent combination of high commercialism and consumerism, seller enthusiasm and buyer naiveté. Seemingly caught off guard by new forms of media and technology, many still believed what they saw on the covers of magazines, on TV, on the internet, on their friends’ brand-new social media profiles. Sure, there was some baseline distrust of images—iconoclasm is as old as the icon—but savvy cynicism wasn’t quite as mainstream as it is today. It’s almost as if, in the late ’90s and early 2000s, it wasn’t fully understood, or maybe was simply ignored, that Photoshop is a powerful manipulative tool, that reality TV is an oxymoronic term, that the pictures from your ex’s vacation might not be telling the whole story. When Collins burst onto the scene at the start of this decade with her “real,” “raw,” “honest” photographic explorations of femininity, beauty, and sex, although she was borrowing heavily from many who came before her—Nan Goldin, Cindy Sherman, and Ryan McGinley, to name a few—it felt a little revolutionary.

Now, years later, but still just twenty-five years old, Collins has published Petra Collins: Coming of Age (2017), an attempt to put her meteoric rise to renown into a larger cultural and artistic context. Dubbed her first monograph, the book mixes Collins’s words and photographs with interviews, essays, and messages from other prominent voices, all reflecting on one subject: Petra Collins. Across the board, the guest contributors, from artist Laurie Simmons to writer Karley Sciortino, are unabashedly adoring. Model Diana Veras’s note begins, “Well first of all you’re fucking amazing and all your work has blown me away recently.” These sentiments would ring false, and their inclusion would feel tacky, if they weren’t expressed with such sincerity and urgency. What quickly becomes clear, when flipping through this book or browsing the comments section below a @petrafcollins Instagram post, is that many fans of Collins don’t just like her work; they’re thankful for it.

It’s this—the feeling that Collins has somehow given us something that we needed, or has finally said something that we’ve all been thinking—that has made her, for better or worse, a poster child. Having tapped into a wishful shift away from the inauthentic and fake, perhaps it’s no coincidence that her popularity has grown right alongside the recent revival of analog technologies like vinyl records and film cameras. Collins’s early work feels unmediated, like peeks behind the scenes. These images of teens hanging out, applying makeup, taking selfies—performing for their own cameras, not Collins’s—positioned her as a kind of visual truthsayer, an artist working to debunk the myth of the hairless body, the unblemished face, emotional invulnerability, uncomplicated happiness, perfect families, perfect romances, perfect lives.

But the most powerful force fueling Collins’s widespread fandom stems from her firsthand understanding of just how uniquely damaging it must be to grow up female in a Western world of false idols. (This is an experience I cannot directly speak to, but I hope it’s important for people of all genders to consider—with awareness and empathy—what it’s like to be a woman in a patriarchy.) Constructing a sense of self is a process of comparison, of establishing some idea of how one fits into the sociocultural context in which they live. So how could a young woman not feel alienation and shame when surrounded by imagery in which she fundamentally cannot see herself represented? But, to that same point, how could a young person of color not experience something similar? Or, for that matter, a young trans person of any race? Petra Collins: Coming of Age mostly features thin white women, a fact that feels incongruous with the goal Collins plainly lays out in her introduction: “This book is extremely personal, but I hope that when you look at it you can see yourself in it, too.”

The nagging question that will always sit just below the surface of any conversation about Collins is whether images, even ones made with an impulse to convey truth, can ever really be truthful, particularly because her photographs are celebrated for their “honesty.” That is, if Collins’s audience expects her to close the gap between who we are and how we are portrayed, are they bound to be disappointed? And if her mentality and work are, in large part, a reaction to feeling lied to by the images she was exposed to growing up, why should we trust images now, even hers?

Or maybe there’s another, more pressing question: If Collins is after honesty, at least in some sense, why is she a photographer? And why is she now working for fashion brands (Gucci, Bulgari, Juicy Couture) that are among the worst offenders of producing and propagating images that lie between their teeth? There’s a moment at the midpoint of Petra Collins: Coming of Age, in her dialogue with artist Marilyn Minter, that approaches an answer. Referring to media as the vehicle “that gives us all of our information,” Collins says, “It’s our duty to change it by working inside of it.” This statement of intent signals that her work, whether documentary or commercial, is never really without agenda. But it’s also an admission of her overall project’s inherent shortcoming—that her pictures are, at the end of the day, still pictures, part of the very thing they hope to undo.

Gideon Jacobs is a writer who has contributed to The New Yorker, The Paris Review, It’s Nice That, and BuzzFeed, among others, and previously was Creative Director at Magnum Photos.

Petra Collins: Coming of Age was published by Rizzoli in October 2017.

The post Is Petra Collins More than Screen Deep? appeared first on Aperture Foundation NY.

Source: https://aperture.org

Barcelona At Night


Thinking of being a digital Nomad?

I am! Well, sort of. Yeah, I guess I am. This basically means you are kind of homeless and just jump around the world in search of awesome places to “be” while having a decent place to stay, great food, and, maybe most importantly, Fast Internet! If you’re looking to try this, check out Nomad List. You’ll see today’s Daily Photo location of Barcelona up there at #2 on the list! 🙂

Daily Photo – Barcelona At Night

What a pretty city, eh? I was happy to be in good health this time in Barcelona. My first visit was about 5 years ago with my wife and I had the flu. Even though I was very excited to be there and take photos, I was just kinda low-energy-man. That’s not like me! I’m normally full of vim and vigor. So, when I’m low-energy-man, I’m like a different person. But not this time, this time I was well-rested and ready to go!

Photo Information

  • Date Taken2017-04-29 20:02:18
  • CameraX1D
  • Camera MakeHasselblad
  • Exposure Time1/4
  • Aperture3.2
  • ISO100
  • Focal Length90.0 mm
  • Flash
  • Exposure ProgramManual
  • Exposure Bias

Source: http://ift.tt/2sX4vPC

seating for 7 or 11 {our couch}

It only took over a year, but our couch is finally finished and I can post on it! I feel like part of what I can offer on this blog is encouragement – encouragement especially for parents who can never seem to get a project finished.

From when the first boards were cut to when the cushions were finally finished – nearly 14 months. We did have a big delay because the fabric got put on backorder for nearly 5 months and we moved to China for 3 months. Sometimes (well, most of the time for me) I have to pick between kids and projects. Kids win – they give better hugs 😉

Our living room is pretty small and as a family of 7 we needed to maximize the seating space. We’ve never been able to all sit next to each other or actually all even have seats in the living room, so I had dreams of a big couch that filled the space and overflowed with my people.

I was drawn to solid colors, especially the current velvet trend. However, I have 5 kids and lots and lots of their friends over on a weekly basis. I don’t want to be worried about stains and I want my kids and their friends to feel at home. Needless to say, a solid velvet was not an option. I needed a durable fabric with a print. Out of the blue one day my friend Amanda sent me a text with a photo of fabric that reminded her of me. It was a perfect green floral barkcloth. (It is called Elaine in Orange by Gertrude Made – but is out of stock again).

I looked online for sectionals, but could not find one that perfectly fit the dimensions of the room. My favorite was from Pop & Scott, but the length wasn’t right for our room. I knew I wanted patterned cushions and the couch to be the length of the room and I could not find it. SO…. “Hey dad, do you want to build me a couch? And, Mom, can you sew the cushion covers?” Well, a conversation similar to that took place.

I showed my dad what I had in mind and he went to work drawing up plans. In no time the couch was being built.Once the wood portion was finished, I began working on the cushions. For those curious, here is what I did:

1. Purchased 3″ foam from JoAnn’s (watch for this to go on sale, I got it 50% off and for as much foam as I ordered, that was a significant amount of savings)

2. Measured and cut foam to fit the couch (an electric knife works awesome for cutting foam)3. I wanted the cushions to be rounded on the edges, so I beveled the corners. 

4. To make the cushions soft and more fluffy, I wrapped them in alternative down comforters. Unfortunately, the only photo of that process I can find is this one of me goofing off with my niece. You can see the comforters in the background. I hand-stitched each comforter around the foam. It was a painstaking process!

5. My wonderful mom created ‘fitted sheets’ out of the fabric. This is the best ever option for a couch that has lots of extra kids over all the time! Pop them off and into the washing machine. Mom hacking at its finest!

6. My mom made the back cushions. She started with a foam base and then wrapped them in padding to make them sturdy, but soft. They are covered in zip pillow cases for easy removal and cleaning.

The other night I counted 11 kids on the couch watching a movie. I snapped a photo and sent it to my parents…mission accomplished. And it looks cute too!Every project my dad makes for me he leaves a little note. He welded the note into the studio stairs, boys’ loft, and our living room stairs. My grandpa did the same. If you look hard enough, you’ll find a note to Dudette #1 (that’s me) on half of my house. Notice the year he finished the wood part of the couch…I wasn’t joking!My dad turned the legs on my grandpa’s lathe. He asked me if I wanted an ornate design, knowing I always go simple. We settled on a slightly tapered leg.
It was well worth the wait! In the evening you will find all seven of us piled next to each other. It makes me ridiculously happy to stretch my arms out and have my people all close to me. It is even more special because of the hands that made it.

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Photoessay: Watercourse

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Being an island, water is of course unavoidable pretty much everywhere you go in Iceland – it shapes the country and often emerges in spectacular form from the least expected of places. Volcanic rock is of course extremely hard and resilient, but eventually the water wins; what I found most mind-boggling about the landscape wasn’t the scale, spectacle or extremes – but the fact that it will continue to change dramatically. What we see is but an instantaneous snapshot of a work in progress that will only get more spectacular with time, assuming a) we as the human race are still around to see it, and b) we haven’t somehow messed it up ourselves. I do realise the irony in that thought – and I’m sure many people will point out that I’m directly contributing to b) by merely visiting. Yet without more of us going and exploring to know what ought to be preserved, we can’t preserve it – or more importantly, give the landscape enough visibility in the wider social context so that people are aware that it needs to be preserved. Curiously, quantum mechanics is correct again even at this scale: we influence the outcome by measuring (recording) it…MT

Shot with the Hasselblad X1D Field Kit and processed with PS Workflow III.

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Ultraprints from this series are available on request here

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More info on Hasselblad cameras and lenses can be found here.

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Images and content copyright Ming Thein | mingthein.com 2012 onwards unless otherwise stated. All rights reserved

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Next-Level Family Photography

Bauer’s purpose in photography was to capture the personalities of her children so their pictures could be sent to family far away. This also begun after adopting their youngest child, Willie, so her birth parents could have the opportunity to see her grow up.

First day for all three

Every photograph was taken with the purpose of lessening the distance between families and capturing memories. Thankfully, her models have adjusted to the constant sight of the camera, and now it’s just seen as an extension of their mom. Bauer says “Every once in awhile I might call their name and ask them about something they are doing and they have no problem connecting to me and my camera.”

Bauer’s photography plays a big influence on her family’s quotidian routine as she takes hundreds of photos per day! This hobby rapidly expanded into multiple part-time jobs for Offset, GalleryStock, Almay, and Fotolia. Bauer remains in shock with the fact that she can make money doing something she would have done anyways!

Sometimes you just need a little help opening your eyes in the morning

None of it would have been possible without her three sensational kids constantly in center focus. “Since they are so close in age – we had three under three – they are almost each other’s best friends.  They can be content playing with a pile of dirt on the top of a hillside for hours, which gives me plenty of time to experiment with images from every direction and angle.”

Bauer discusses how fortunate she is to have such energetic children overflowing with charisma and curiosity. “They fully immerse themselves in whatever environment we are visiting, whether it’s hiking Mt. Rainer, climbing the majestic trees in the Olympic peninsula rainforests or here in the Midwest, wading through rivers, playing tag in green meadows or becoming best friends with the cows in their grandpa’s barn.  We love to explore so most of the images are taken on our various adventures – even if it’s just hiking through the woods in our backyard.  Both my sons and my daughter love to get dirty, love to climb trees, love to make believe they are in a forest kingdom looking for giants.”

Debating

Since Bauer is a family photographer, the camera follows the kids. This means she has had to familiarize herself with every sort of lighting imaginable. Though the golden sun around 4 p.m. can be a flattering background, it can also be incredibly bright during the middle of the day when the kids are out which is why she likes the consistency of indoor light.

Bauer elaborates on the harsh weather conditions and how she has managed to cope: “I am drawn to vibrant colors and they just come alive in full sun. In that kind of lighting, I try to get shots from behind the kids to avoid the harsh shadows. I also love shooting from the perspective of what they see and what they are looking at.” Giving your photos a perspective shift can add an unexpected element of interesting!

“For the last several years living in the Pacific Northwest, I had to make use of the sparse light you get during the cloudy, drizzly winter days and look for the small amount of soft light coming in the window. I like the calmness it conveys. Also, because of all the overcast days, I got used to figuring out how to do the best with flat lighting situations. Because the light is not very interesting on its own, the other elements of the photo have to compensate.”

Hide and seek, wild style

When asking Bauer what advice would she give to herself if she had to begin photography all over again, she said not to be afraid to crank your ISO up in order to have a faster shutter speed (especially with the kids). “I was too afraid to embrace the grain for too long.” As demonstrated by the photograph above, if you want to capture speed, then you’re going to have to be unafraid of the consequences!

Her second piece of advice would be to “forget about getting the perfect shot, sometimes the best emotion happens to be out of focus, but it is still a memory worth remembering.”

What summer is made of

For more of Bauer’s spectacular photos, check out her Photostream! With a snowy winter rapidly approaching her home, expect to see the most beautiful and creative photos around packed with winter activities such as skiing, snowshoeing, snowball fights, snow forts, etc! There are lots in store for Bauer’s future in photography. We can’t wait to see where she goes next.

 

 

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