Funny how? Presenting the CR Humour Issue

Cover by Pâté, pateontoast.co.uk

Our February /March issue is a special themed edition of CR in which we examine the oh-so-serious topic of being funny. Here are some of the highlights:

Wes Anderson’s stop-motion epic Isle of Dogs arrives in UK cinemas in March. We talk to the film’s production designers Adam Stockhausen and Paul Harrod about bringing Anderson’s vision of a dystopian future Japan to life, the director’s legendary attention to detail and creating the film’s lovable canine characters. By Rachael Steven
The daily commute is never very funny, but the DLR in London has found that putting a bit of comedy and personality into its on-train announcements has made its passengers’ journeys a lot more pleasant, while also solving a business problem. By Eliza Williams
Comedy thrives on Twitter, thanks to its range of unique joke formats and structures. In constant flux, the platform’s humour is often hard to pin down – and all the more amusing for it. By Daniel Benneworth-Gray
In movieland there’s one surefire typeface for all things funny. Here’s how Gill Sans UltraBold became the unlikely king of comedy. By Matthew Young
From her time at Tibor Kalman’s M&Co to her current work at Pentagram New York, playfulness and wit are at the heart of Emily Oberman’s approach. She talks to Emily Gosling about finding those ‘aha’ moments that combine both humour and humanity
Comedy, in the world of advertising, is broken, says Droga5’s David Kolbusz. Cause-based campaigns have rendered it unfashionable and unlikely to win awards. He offers six steps back to being funny.
Since the 1970s, New Yorker cartoonist Roz Chast’s drawings have been providing keenly observed portraits of modern life – from the experience of caring for elderly parents to the chaos of living in New York City. Here she explains her process to Rachael Steven
Pentagram’s Naresh Ramchandani on why brands stopped being funny and why it’s time to start making us laugh once again.
How the story behind one (very) famous album cover exemplifies so much about the workings
of the creative process and the difference between humour and wit in design
As a keen-eyed observer of modern life, Stephen Collins produces some of the funniest cartoons around. He tells us about his working process, where he gets his ideas from – and reveals just what goes on at the ‘Whimsy Mine’, via a brand new comic drawn specially for Creative Review
Dominic Wilcox takes everyday objects and actions into the realm of the unusual, with results as varied as a Stained Glass Car to an art exhibition for dogs. He’s now helping kids to realise their own inventive ideas. By Emily Gosling
The adventures of Asterix the Gaul have been amusing British readers since 1969, thanks to the brilliant translations of Anthea Bell and Derek Hockridge. Last year, Adriana Hunter took over the job of converting the jokes, puns and celebrated character names into English. We talk to her about what the process involves. By Mark Sinclair

The issue also features photographersTyler Mitchell and Prarthna Singh, a look back at 20 years of onedotzero, Jude Kelly, Jamie Hewlett, Marina Willer, Tanya Livesey on trust, John Kampfner on post-Brexit challenges, Claire Bridges on creating a vision board and Daniel Benneworth-Gray on the art of distraction

The February/March issue of CR will be available on newsstands and to buy directly from CR on February 28

The post Funny how? Presenting the CR Humour Issue appeared first on Creative Review.

Source: http://ift.tt/1KjyLUn

Funny how? Presenting the CR Humour Issue

Cover by Pâté, pateontoast.co.uk

Our February /March issue is a special themed edition of CR in which we examine the oh-so-serious topic of being funny. Here are some of the highlights:

Wes Anderson’s stop-motion epic Isle of Dogs arrives in UK cinemas in March. We talk to the film’s production designers Adam Stockhausen and Paul Harrod about bringing Anderson’s vision of a dystopian future Japan to life, the director’s legendary attention to detail and creating the film’s lovable canine characters. By Rachael Steven
The daily commute is never very funny, but the DLR in London has found that putting a bit of comedy and personality into its on-train announcements has made its passengers’ journeys a lot more pleasant, while also solving a business problem. By Eliza Williams
Comedy thrives on Twitter, thanks to its range of unique joke formats and structures. In constant flux, the platform’s humour is often hard to pin down – and all the more amusing for it. By Daniel Benneworth-Gray
In movieland there’s one surefire typeface for all things funny. Here’s how Gill Sans UltraBold became the unlikely king of comedy. By Matthew Young
From her time at Tibor Kalman’s M&Co to her current work at Pentagram New York, playfulness and wit are at the heart of Emily Oberman’s approach. She talks to Emily Gosling about finding those ‘aha’ moments that combine both humour and humanity
Comedy, in the world of advertising, is broken, says Droga5’s David Kolbusz. Cause-based campaigns have rendered it unfashionable and unlikely to win awards. He offers six steps back to being funny.
Since the 1970s, New Yorker cartoonist Roz Chast’s drawings have been providing keenly observed portraits of modern life – from the experience of caring for elderly parents to the chaos of living in New York City. Here she explains her process to Rachael Steven
Pentagram’s Naresh Ramchandani on why brands stopped being funny and why it’s time to start making us laugh once again.
How the story behind one (very) famous album cover exemplifies so much about the workings
of the creative process and the difference between humour and wit in design
As a keen-eyed observer of modern life, Stephen Collins produces some of the funniest cartoons around. He tells us about his working process, where he gets his ideas from – and reveals just what goes on at the ‘Whimsy Mine’, via a brand new comic drawn specially for Creative Review
Dominic Wilcox takes everyday objects and actions into the realm of the unusual, with results as varied as a Stained Glass Car to an art exhibition for dogs. He’s now helping kids to realise their own inventive ideas. By Emily Gosling
The adventures of Asterix the Gaul have been amusing British readers since 1969, thanks to the brilliant translations of Anthea Bell and Derek Hockridge. Last year, Adriana Hunter took over the job of converting the jokes, puns and celebrated character names into English. We talk to her about what the process involves. By Mark Sinclair

The issue also features photographersTyler Mitchell and Prarthna Singh, a look back at 20 years of onedotzero, Jude Kelly, Jamie Hewlett, Marina Willer, Tanya Livesey on trust, John Kampfner on post-Brexit challenges, Claire Bridges on creating a vision board and Daniel Benneworth-Gray on the art of distraction

The February/March issue of CR will be available on newsstands and to buy directly from CR on February 28

The post Funny how? Presenting the CR Humour Issue appeared first on Creative Review.

Source: http://ift.tt/1KjyLUn

Funny how? Presenting the CR Humour Issue

Cover by Pâté, pateontoast.co.uk

Our February /March issue is a special themed edition of CR in which we examine the oh-so-serious topic of being funny. Here are some of the highlights:

Wes Anderson’s stop-motion epic Isle of Dogs arrives in UK cinemas in March. We talk to the film’s production designers Adam Stockhausen and Paul Harrod about bringing Anderson’s vision of a dystopian future Japan to life, the director’s legendary attention to detail and creating the film’s lovable canine characters. By Rachael Steven
The daily commute is never very funny, but the DLR in London has found that putting a bit of comedy and personality into its on-train announcements has made its passengers’ journeys a lot more pleasant, while also solving a business problem. By Eliza Williams
Comedy thrives on Twitter, thanks to its range of unique joke formats and structures. In constant flux, the platform’s humour is often hard to pin down – and all the more amusing for it. By Daniel Benneworth-Gray
In movieland there’s one surefire typeface for all things funny. Here’s how Gill Sans UltraBold became the unlikely king of comedy. By Matthew Young
From her time at Tibor Kalman’s M&Co to her current work at Pentagram New York, playfulness and wit are at the heart of Emily Oberman’s approach. She talks to Emily Gosling about finding those ‘aha’ moments that combine both humour and humanity
Comedy, in the world of advertising, is broken, says Droga5’s David Kolbusz. Cause-based campaigns have rendered it unfashionable and unlikely to win awards. He offers six steps back to being funny.
Since the 1970s, New Yorker cartoonist Roz Chast’s drawings have been providing keenly observed portraits of modern life – from the experience of caring for elderly parents to the chaos of living in New York City. Here she explains her process to Rachael Steven
Pentagram’s Naresh Ramchandani on why brands stopped being funny and why it’s time to start making us laugh once again.
How the story behind one (very) famous album cover exemplifies so much about the workings
of the creative process and the difference between humour and wit in design
As a keen-eyed observer of modern life, Stephen Collins produces some of the funniest cartoons around. He tells us about his working process, where he gets his ideas from – and reveals just what goes on at the ‘Whimsy Mine’, via a brand new comic drawn specially for Creative Review
Dominic Wilcox takes everyday objects and actions into the realm of the unusual, with results as varied as a Stained Glass Car to an art exhibition for dogs. He’s now helping kids to realise their own inventive ideas. By Emily Gosling
The adventures of Asterix the Gaul have been amusing British readers since 1969, thanks to the brilliant translations of Anthea Bell and Derek Hockridge. Last year, Adriana Hunter took over the job of converting the jokes, puns and celebrated character names into English. We talk to her about what the process involves. By Mark Sinclair

The issue also features photographersTyler Mitchell and Prarthna Singh, a look back at 20 years of onedotzero, Jude Kelly, Jamie Hewlett, Marina Willer, Tanya Livesey on trust, John Kampfner on post-Brexit challenges, Claire Bridges on creating a vision board and Daniel Benneworth-Gray on the art of distraction

The February/March issue of CR will be available on newsstands and to buy directly from CR on February 28

The post Funny how? Presenting the CR Humour Issue appeared first on Creative Review.

Source: http://ift.tt/1KjyLUn

A National Park-Inspired Chapel Composed of Branching Fractals by Yu Momeoda

Agri Chapel is located within a national park on the northwest coast of Japan’s island of Kyushu. The chapel was constructed by Japanese architect Yu Momoeda, who wanted to reflect the surrounding forest by bringing tree-like forms into the building.

To create the structure’s central dome, Momoeda stacked wooden pillars in the shape of simplistic tree branches. This nature-based support system imitates the branching fractals found in trees, with ascending symmetrical patterns spread throughout the light-filled space. (via Jeroen Apers)

Source: http://ift.tt/odnItH

A National Park-Inspired Chapel Composed of Branching Fractals by Yu Momeoda

Agri Chapel is located within a national park on the northwest coast of Japan’s island of Kyushu. The chapel was constructed by Japanese architect Yu Momoeda, who wanted to reflect the surrounding forest by bringing tree-like forms into the building.

To create the structure’s central dome, Momoeda stacked wooden pillars in the shape of simplistic tree branches. This nature-based support system imitates the branching fractals found in trees, with ascending symmetrical patterns spread throughout the light-filled space. (via Jeroen Apers)

Source: http://ift.tt/odnItH

A National Park-Inspired Chapel Composed of Branching Fractals by Yu Momeoda

Agri Chapel is located within a national park on the northwest coast of Japan’s island of Kyushu. The chapel was constructed by Japanese architect Yu Momoeda, who wanted to reflect the surrounding forest by bringing tree-like forms into the building.

To create the structure’s central dome, Momoeda stacked wooden pillars in the shape of simplistic tree branches. This nature-based support system imitates the branching fractals found in trees, with ascending symmetrical patterns spread throughout the light-filled space. (via Jeroen Apers)

Source: http://ift.tt/odnItH

A National Park-Inspired Chapel Composed of Branching Fractals by Yu Momeoda

Agri Chapel is located within a national park on the northwest coast of Japan’s island of Kyushu. The chapel was constructed by Japanese architect Yu Momoeda, who wanted to reflect the surrounding forest by bringing tree-like forms into the building.

To create the structure’s central dome, Momoeda stacked wooden pillars in the shape of simplistic tree branches. This nature-based support system imitates the branching fractals found in trees, with ascending symmetrical patterns spread throughout the light-filled space. (via Jeroen Apers)

Source: http://ift.tt/odnItH

A National Park-Inspired Chapel Composed of Branching Fractals by Yu Momeoda

Agri Chapel is located within a national park on the northwest coast of Japan’s island of Kyushu. The chapel was constructed by Japanese architect Yu Momoeda, who wanted to reflect the surrounding forest by bringing tree-like forms into the building.

To create the structure’s central dome, Momoeda stacked wooden pillars in the shape of simplistic tree branches. This nature-based support system imitates the branching fractals found in trees, with ascending symmetrical patterns spread throughout the light-filled space. (via Jeroen Apers)

Source: http://ift.tt/odnItH

Introducing: The A. Lange & Söhne Lange 1 Daymatic Tokyo Boutique 10th Anniversary Limited Edition

Lange 1.jpg?ixlib=rails 1.1

Quick Take

To celebrate the 10th anniversary of its Tokyo boutique in the popular Ginza shopping district, A. Lange & Söhne is releasing a limited edition version of the Lange 1 Daymatic. The Daymatic is exactly what it sounds like – it has the popular Lange 1 layout, only reversed and with a retrograde display for the day of the week where the power reserve would be on a basic Lange 1. Additionally, it’s automatic, with a full winding rotor visible on top of the movement and its three-quarter plate. What makes this white gold model unique is the guilloché dial, which is solid gold with an argente color treatment and blue accents on the hands and date display. This watch will only be available at the Ginza boutique and production is limited to 20 pieces.

Why This Watch Matters

Japan is an extremely important market for A. Lange & Söhne and some of the biggest Lange collectors in the world are Japanese. As such, the Ginza boutique has become an extremely important one for the brand, so it’s fitting that there would be some sort of celebration to mark its first decade. The Lange 1 Daymatic isn’t the model I would have guessed Lange would choose for the occasion, but it’s a fitting one that they’ve made special with a few subtle-but-special tweaks. 

Initial Thoughts

When it comes to Lange’s watches, I’m typically in the camp that prefers the manually-wound options over the automatic ones. However, I’m willing to make a big exception for this watch. The guilloché work is outstanding and has a certain subtlety on the silver dial, and those blue accents really make the watch sing. I also like that on this model (versus the traditional Lange 1), the time display is on the right, which means it peeks out from your shirt cuff more easily. I have a funny feeling that by the time you read this all 20 watches will already be spoken for.

The Basics

Brand: A. Lange & Söhne
Model: Lange 1 Daymatic Tokyo Boutique 10th Anniversary Limited Edition
Reference Number: 320.040

Diameter: 39.5mm
Thickness: 10.24mm
Case Material: White gold
Dial Color: Argenté with guilloché
Indexes: Applied Roman numerals
Lume: None
Strap/Bracelet: Dark blue alligator strap with white gold prong buckle

The Movement

Caliber: In-House Caliber L021.1
Functions: Hours, minutes, seconds, day of the week, date
Diameter: 31.6mm
Thickness: 6.1mm
Power Reserve: 50 hours
Winding: Automatic
Frequency: 3 Hz (21,600 vph)
Jewels: 67 (7 in screwed gold chatons)
Additional Details: Plates and bridges are crafted from untreated German silver

Pricing & Availability

Price: Coming Soon
Availability: February 2018, only available at the Ginza boutique
Limited Edition: 20 pieces

For more click here.

Source: http://ift.tt/1IiKaDm

How Mark Kamau is bringing free internet to Africa

After abandoning a boyhood dream to play for Manchester United, Mark Kamau’s first encounter with the world of technology came after he enrolled at a computer training school in Nairobi called NairoBits, which was set up by a Dutch non-profit. “They were trying to teach young people in African neighbourhoods how to use computers, hoping that being connected to the internet would change the narratives of their lives,” he says. “This is where my design journey began.”

Scratching at fleas

A few years later, he found himself working at a design firm in Berlin. “One of the clients we worked with there was Hugo Boss. When you walk into a Hugo Boss shop anywhere in the world, it’s really not about the clothes but it’s about the human beings and how they interact with the space and products. I was fascinated by this.” Though Kamau enjoyed his work there, he felt like something was missing.

School children in rural Africa trialing the Kiokit

“There’s an African expression. When someone is doing something that doesn’t solve a problem it’s like ‘scratching at fleas’. So here I was in Berlin, feeling like I was ‘scratching at fleas’ because my people back at home were dealing with bigger problems, lion-sized problems,” Kamau says. So he decided to return to Kenya and apply his knowledge to solving local problems.

Discovering local problems

On returning to Kenya Kamau started working at iHub, an accelerator that helps local business develop technology solutions to better their businesses.

Speaking at Design Indaba 2018, Mark Kamau described the KioKit as “Africa proof” – built to withstand the harshest of weather conditions

“I asked if I could start a human-centered design centre within iHub, and its founders (Erik Hersman and Juliana Rotich) agreed. From this centre we started working with several startups, and the work we were doing started getting attention.” The centre started working as a consultancy, doing work for bigger corporate clients which brought in the paychecks.

Team BRCK on a roadtrip

After three years at iHub, Kamau made his next move – a cross-continent road trip, from Nairobi to Johannesburg. The idea was to visit schools across Africa to try and find problems that needed fixing.

He witnessed vast disparity both in terms of the size and the facilities of the schools he visited. Yet all were asking their pupils to take the same national level examinations. In order to start leveling the playing field, Kamau began to think about how he might bring the internet to those that didn’t have it.

Viable ‘Africa proof’ solutions

He founded a company called BRCK which created two devices, a small portable energy-efficient modem called the BRCK (which runs on a SIM card and can provide internet to users within a classroom-size area) and a kit of tablets for classrooms called the Kiokit (which can be loaded with lessons, games, tests and more).

The BRCK – a compact modem that works on a simcard

Because they were developed as a direct result of spending time with the people who need them and understanding local needs, Kamau says, they are less likely to fail than products created abroad.

Initially some kits were given away for free – as Kamau explains, this was important to the design process. The team collected feedback and were able to improve the product based on the experience of the teachers and students. Then the product was taken to market.

“Now the Kiokit is being bought by countries I didn’t know existed, like Kiribati,” Kamau tells CR. “People have bought some in the Solomon Islands, in Mexico, in Tanzania. The Kenyan government is looking into buying a whole bunch for government schools.”

All the design and build is done in Kenya, but parts are sourced from other parts of the world. “We want to keep it as low as possible, so we have become like global chess players, looking for components that are most affordable. We’re also trying to do some advocacy around taxation and so on, to try and make the production of technology more affordable locally.”

But even then, not many schools can afford spending about $6000 on a Kio Kit. So the the product is also pitched to big multinationals, who are encouraged to buy them in large numbers as part of corporate social responsibility programmes. So far, the response has been positive, Kamau said.

The Kiokit being used in schools

The SupaBRCK

The application of the BRCK isn’t limited to schools, and Kamau was eager to amplify its reach. Now that the Kiokits are doing well, he’s turned his attention to bringing the internet to the streets Africa. And for this they created the SupaBRCK which allows the public to access the internet for free, via a platform called Moja.

Much like Facebook’s controversial free basics, earlier called internet.org, what Moja does is provide users with access to browse the internet – not the whole of the internet but a limited light version of the internet which can only be accessed via the Moja app or captive portal.

Hyper-localised trading and commerce

While usage of app is free – via a laptop or a mobile phone – users are served advertising. In a bid to encourage commerce within local communities all of this advertising comes from local shops, brands and traders, who effectively pay for the users to access the internet.

The SupaBRCK has been fitted on hundreds of ‘matatus’ (mini buses) across Kenya so people can use the internet when they travel and static poles across small towns and villages in Kenya.

The content providers and advertisers Moja works with can target users in specific geographies to serve them relevant ads; like a lunchtime discount at a local restaurant for example or the launch of an album by a local artist. Kamau describes it as a way of creating “hyper-localised trading and commerce”.

“I am very excited about it because we are in an age where more learning happens on the internet,” says Kamau “Going to university can be expensive. But people who can’t afford university can turn to the internet, watch videos online, access online learning, interact with others and earn a living by engaging in e-commerce. Internet access is very important for progress.”

education.brck.com/kiokit

The post How Mark Kamau is bringing free internet to Africa appeared first on Creative Review.

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