An Experimental Short Film Captures the Dramatic Dance of the Seasons

French film director Thomas Blanchard (previously) is known for his video work with oils and inks. In his most recent video, DANCE DANCE, Blanchard uses flowers as the contextual framework for his signature coils and swirls of color. Flowers have long been used as symbols of vitality and mortality, and the fire and ice these blooms are subjected to suggests a literal interpretation of those concepts. In the dramatically scored video, flowers and foliage light on fire, freeze and melt in icy pools, and are consumed by billowing clouds of colorful smoke. You can see more of Blanchard’s work on Vimeo, Behance, and Facebook. (via We and the Color)

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Just Because: A Clock Designed To Run For 10,000 Years Is Being Installed In A Texas Mountain

Longnow.jpg?ixlib=rails 1.1

If you’ve been rattling around in horology circles in the last 15 or 20 years, you may have run across a unique (and I do mean unique) clock project, undertaken by an organization called the Long Now Foundation. The Long Now Foundation was created in 1996, and "…hopes to provide a counterpoint to today’s accelerating culture and help make long-term thinking more common." One of its initiatives is the Clock Of The Long Now, which is designed to run for at least 10 millennia, without any need for human intervention. Amazon founder Jeff Bezos took an interest in the project six years ago, and has funded it to the tune of $42 million, and he recently shared a time-lapse video of the clock’s construction. The installation phase of the project has begun and part of the video shows the installation of the clock’s massive driving weight.

The Clock Of The Long Now is an extremely interesting project from a technical standpoint, to say the least. It’s essentially a grandfather clock on steroids, although to say so is a fairly dramatic understatement. The clock is the brainchild of inventor and computer engineer Danny Hillis and the name of the Foundation was suggested by his friend, the composer Brian Eno; in 2000, an eight-foot-tall working prototype was shown, and now the full version itself is coming together.

A working prototype, on display in the London Science Museum.

A working prototype, on display in the London Science Museum. (Image: Wikipedia)

The heart of the clock is a titanium torsion pendulum that beats once every 10 seconds. The falling weight that powers the clock can be wound by hand, but it is kept wound by solar power: sunlight shines into an aperture in the 500-ft.-deep chamber in which the clock sits, striking an air-filled cylinder. The expansion of the cylinder provides enough energy to lift the falling weight slightly, and also provides a solar noon time reference for correcting the clock. I just said that this is a grandfather clock on steroids, but really it’s more of an Atmos clock on steroids and I wonder if the Atmos might not have partially influenced the design for the Clock Of The Long Now, as two key features of the Atmos are its very slow beat (one second) torsion pendulum, and the fact that it’s kept wound by changes in temperature. And of course, there is the fact that the Atmos will keep running without human intervention, which is an essential feature for the Clock Of The Long Now.

One key energy feature for the clock is that the displays are not active until a human enters the clock chamber and fully winds the mechanism. Once the weight is in its uppermost position, the time will be displayed on the main clock dial, the positions of the planets in the orrery atop the clock will be updated, and a complex chiming mechanism will ring the time; the chiming mechanism consists of a stack of gears that are capable of calculating a different strike order for the clock’s 10 gongs, every day, for 10,000 years.

The clock’s materials are deliberately inexpensive, to discourage looting, and its location (on land Bezos owns) is quite remote; the nearest airport is two hours away and getting to the clock chamber requires hiking up 2,000 feet from the desert floor. It’s also designed so that most of its components can be repaired using nothing more than Bronze Age technology and tools. 

A clock designed to run for 10,000 years is an hubristic project, of course, but also a quite fascinating one – you can watch the installation video as well as find out more about the clock, and its chances of running for about as long as human civilization has existed, at LongNow.org.

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Friday essay: the erotic art of Ancient Greece and Rome

A fragment of a wall painting showing two lovers in bed from the House of L Caecilius Jucundus in Pompeii, now at Naples National Archaeological Museum Wikimedia Commons

In our sexual histories series, authors explore changing sexual mores from antiquity to today.

Rarely does L.P. Hartley’s dictum that “the past is a foreign country” hold more firmly than in the area of sexuality in classical art. Erotic images and depictions of genitalia, the phallus in particular, were incredibly popular motifs across a wide range of media in ancient Greece and Rome.

Simply put, sex is everywhere in Greek and Roman art. Explicit sexual representations were common on Athenian black-figure and red-figure vases of the sixth and fifth centuries BC. They are often eye-openingly confronting in nature.

Bronze tintinnabula in the shape of flying phalluses, Pompeii, first century AD.
Gabinetto Segreto del Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli.

Wikimedia

The Romans too were surrounded by sex. The phallus, sculpted in bronze as tintinnabula (wind chimes), were commonly found in the gardens of the houses of Pompeii, and sculpted in relief on wall panels, such as the famous one from a Roman bakery telling us hic habitat felicitas (“here dwells happiness”).

However these classical images of erotic acts and genitalia reflect more than a sex obsessed culture. The depictions of sexuality and sexual activities in classical art seem to have had a wide variety of uses. And our interpretations of these images – often censorious in modern times – reveal much about our own attitudes to sex.

Modern responses

When the collection of antiquities first began in earnest in the 17th and 18th centuries, the openness of ancient eroticism puzzled and troubled Enlightenment audiences. This bewilderment only intensified after excavations began at the rediscovered Roman towns of Pompeii and Herculaneum.

The Gabinetto Segreto (the so-called “Secret Cabinet”) of the Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli best typifies the modern response to classical sexuality in art – repression and suppression.

The secret cabinet was founded in 1819, when Francis I, King of Naples, visited the museum with his wife and young daughter. Shocked by the explicit imagery, he ordered all items of a sexual nature be removed from view and locked in the cabinet. Access would be restricted to scholars, of “mature age and respected morals”. That was, male scholars only.

Erotic terracotta sculptures in a showcase in the Gabinetto Segreto at the Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli. Found in a Samnite sanctuary in the old town of Cales (Calvi Risorta).
Wikimedia

In Pompeii itself, where explicit material such as the wallpaintings of the brothel was retained in situ, metal shutters were installed. These shutters restricted access to only male tourists willing to pay additional fees, until as recently as the 1960s.

Of course, the secrecy of the collection in the cabinet only increased its fame, even if access was at times difficult. John Murray’s Handbook to South Italy and Naples (1853) sanctimoniously states that permission was exceedingly difficult to obtain:

Very few therefore have seen the collection; and those who have, are said to have no desire to repeat their visit.

The cabinet was not opened to the general public until 2000 (despite protests by the Catholic Church). Since 2005, the collection has been displayed in a separate room; the objects have still not been reunited with contemporary non-sexual artefacts as they were in antiquity.

Literature also felt the wrath of the censors, with works such as Aristophanes’ plays mistranslated to obscure their “offensive” sexual and scatalogical references. Lest we try to claim any moral and liberal superiority in the 21st century, the infamous marble sculptural depiction of Pan copulating with a goat from the collection still shocks modern audiences.

Marble statue of Pan copulating with goat, found the Villa of the Papyri, Herculaneum. first century AD.
Wikimedia

The censorship of ancient sexuality is perhaps best typified by the long tradition of removing genitals from classical sculpture.

The Vatican Museum in particular (but not exclusively) was famed for altering classical art for the sake of contemporary morals and sensibilities. The application of carved and cast fig leaves to cover the genitalia was common, if incongruous.

It also indicated a modern willingness to associate nudity with sexuality, which would have puzzled an ancient audience, for whom the body’s physical form was in itself regarded as perfection. So have we been misreading ancient sexuality all this time? Well, yes.

Marble statue of Mercury in the Vatican collection. The fig leaf is a later addition.
Wikimedia

Ancient porn?

It is difficult to tell to what extent ancient audiences used explicit erotic imagery for arousal. Certainly, the erotic scenes that were popular on vessels would have given the Athenian parties a titillating atmosphere as wine was consumed.

Athenian red-figure kylix, attributed to Dokimasia Painter, c. 480 BC. British Museum.
The Trustees of the British Museum

These types of scenes are especially popular on the kylix, or wine-cup, particularly within the tondo (central panel of the cup). Hetairai (courtesans) and pornai (prostitutes) may well have attended the same symposia, so the scenes may have been used as a stimuli.

Painted erotica was replaced by moulded depictions in the later Greek and Roman eras, but the use must have been similar, and the association of sex with drinking is strong in this series.

The application of sexual scenes to oil lamps by the Romans is perhaps the most likely scenario where the object was actually used within the setting of love-making. Erotica is common on mould-made lamps.

The phallus and fertility

Although female nudity was not uncommon (particularly in association with the goddess Aphrodite), phallic symbolism was at the centre of much classical art.

The phallus would often be depicted on Hermes, Pan, Priapus or similar deities across various art forms. Rather than being seen as erotic, its symbolism here was often associated with protection, fertility and even healing. We have already seen the phallus used in a range of domestic and commercial contexts in Pompeii, a clear reflection of its protective properties.

Marble Herm, from Siphnos, Greece. c. 520 BC. National Archaeological Museum, Athens.
Wikimedia

A herm was a stone sculpture with a head (usually of Hermes) above a rectangular pillar, upon which male genitals were carved. These blocks were positioned at borders and boundaries for protection, and were so highly valued that in 415 BC when the hermai of Athens were vandalised prior to the departure of the Athenian fleet many believed this would threaten the success of the naval mission.

A famous fresco from the House of the Vetti in Pompeii shows Priapus, a minor deity and guardian of livestock, plants and gardens. He has a massive penis, holds a bag of coins, and has a bowl of fruit at his feet. As researcher Claudia Moser writes, the image represents three kinds of prosperity: growth (the large member), fertility (the fruit), and affluence (the bag of money).

It is worth noting that even a casual glance at classical sculptures in a museum will reveal that the penis on marble depictions of nude gods and heroes is often quite small. Classical cultural ideals valued a smaller penis over a larger, often to the surprise of modern audiences.

All representations of large penises in classical art are associated with lustfulness and foolishness. Priapus was so despised by the other gods he was thrown off Mt Olympus. Bigger was not better for the Greeks and Romans.

Myths and sex

Classical mythology is based upon sex: myths abound with stories of incest, intermarriage, polygamy and adultery, so artistic depictions of mythology were bound to depict these sometimes explicit tales. Zeus’s cavalier attitude towards female consent within these myths (among many examples, he raped Leda in the guise of a swan and Danae while disguised as the rain) reinforced misogynistic ideas of male domination and female subservience.

A mosaic depicting Leda and the swan, circa third century AD, from the Sanctuary of Aphrodite, Palea Paphos; now in the Cyprus Museum, Nicosia.
Wikimedia

The phallus was also highlighted in depictions of Dionysiac revelry. Dionysos, the Greek god of wine, theatre and transformation was highly sexualised, as were his followers – the male satyrs and female maenads, and their depiction on wine vessels is not surprising.

Satyrs were half-men, half-goats. Somewhat comic, yet also tragic to a degree, they were inveterate masturbators and party animals with an appetite for dancing, wine and women. Indeed the word satyriasis has survived today, classified in the World Health Organisation’s International Classification of Diseases (ICD) as a form of male hypersexuality, alongside the female form, nymphomania.

Detail of an Athenian red-figure psykter (cooler) depicting a satyr balancing a kantharos on his penis, painted by Douris, c. 500-490 BC. British Museum.
Wikimedia

The intention of the ithyphallic (erect) satyrs is clear in their appearance on vases (even if they rarely caught the maenads they were chasing); at the same time their massive erect penises are indicative of the “beastliness” and grotesque ugliness of a large penis as opposed to the classical ideal of male beauty represented by a smaller one.

Actors who performed in satyr plays during dramatic festivals took to the stage and orchestra with fake phallus costumes to indicate that they were not humans, but these mythical beasts of Dionysus.

Early collectors of classical art were shocked to discover that the Greeks and Romans they so admired were earthy humans too with a range of sexual needs and desires. But in emphasising the sexual aspects of this art they underplayed the non-sexual role of phallic symbols.

The Conversation

Craig Barker does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organization that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment.

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Complex Moiré Patterns Created by Mechanical Drawings Machines by James Nolan Gandy

Artist and metalworker James Nolan Gandy creates elaborate drawing machines that easily put your childhood spirograph to shame. The machines are engineered from relatively simple mechanisms that when combined, produce mind-boggling shapes and interconnected moiré patterns.

Although the gears and pulleys are crafted in a way to make some of the work on their own, Gandy has not yet manufactured a system to lift the pen at specific intervals. Therefore many of his works are collaborative studies, equally created from the talents of man and machine. Some of my favorites are those created with a high contrast between paper and ink, such as the brilliant blue form seen in his drawing below.

You can view more of Gandy’s drawing machines in action on his Instagram. (via The Awesomer)

A post shared by James Nolan Gandy (@gandyworks) on

A post shared by James Nolan Gandy (@gandyworks) on

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Complex Moiré Patterns Created by Mechanical Drawings Machines by James Nolan Gandy

Artist and metalworker James Nolan Gandy creates elaborate drawing machines that easily put your childhood spirograph to shame. The machines are engineered from relatively simple mechanisms that when combined, produce mind-boggling shapes and interconnected moiré patterns.

Although the gears and pulleys are crafted in a way to make some of the work on their own, Gandy has not yet manufactured a system to lift the pen at specific intervals. Therefore many of his works are collaborative studies, equally created from the talents of man and machine. Some of my favorites are those created with a high contrast between paper and ink, such as the brilliant blue form seen in his drawing below.

You can view more of Gandy’s drawing machines in action on his Instagram. (via The Awesomer)

A post shared by James Nolan Gandy (@gandyworks) on

A post shared by James Nolan Gandy (@gandyworks) on

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Contemporary Israeli Sculpture from the Stern Collection

Jerome and Ellen Stern were passionate collectors of art from across the globe, including Israel, and they played an important role in supporting the museums there. Regular visitors to their home in Jerusalem, they frequently visited with artists and curators.


MENASHE KADISHMAN, THE FOREST, 1970. ESTIMATE $40,000–60,000.

They enjoyed a particularly long and close friendship with Menashe Kadishman and acquired many works by the artist over the years. The Forest was a particularly important purchase, having originally been displayed in Central Park as part of an exhibition that extended beyond the walls of the Jewish Museum in a show curated by Susan Goodman called Using Walls in 1970.

In the late 1960s and early 1970s, Kadishman was an important exponent of the Environmental or Land Art movement. A friend of Robert Rauschenberg, Andy Warhol and Christo, The Forest presaged Christo and Jeanne-Claude’s The Gates in Central Park by some 35 years. Christo was known to acknowledge Kadishman’s sculpture as an inspiration for his own environmental projects.


MENASHE KADISHMAN, OM, 1969. ESTIMATE $40,000–60,000.

The other sculpture by Kadishman offered in TO LIVE WITH ART: Property from the Jerome & Ellen Stern Collection, Om, is an outstanding example of Kadishman’s gravity-defying sculptures full of dynamic tension. Another of Kadishman’s works from this series, Suspended is a popular work at the Storm King Art Center.


ZADOK BEN-DAVID, THE LIZARD AND THE LEAF, 1988. ESTIMATE $15,000–20,000.

Also represented in the collection is Zadok Ben-David, an Israeli sculptor of enormous talent. Now residing in London, he has exhibited his installations all over the world, including in England, Israel, China, Japan, Uzbekistan, South Korea and Australia, Germany and Italy.


ZADOK BEN-DAVID, ANOTHER SUNNY MORNING, 1988. ESTIMATE $15,000–20,000.

Ben-David was also the focus of Sotheby’s first-ever selling exhibition of outdoor sculpture in Asia at the magnificent Singapore Botanic Gardens in 2012. The two sculptures in this sale are rare early works from 1988, the period of his iconic sculpture on the Tel Aviv Beachfront, Beyond the Limit.

Jerome and Ellen Stern were passionate collectors of art from across the globe, including Israel, and they played an important role in supporting the museums there. Regular visitors to their home in Jerusalem, they frequently visited with artists and curators. MENASHE KADISHMAN, THE FOREST, 1970. ESTIMATE $40,000–60,000. They enjoyed a particularly long and close friendship with Menashe Kadish… http://ift.tt/2BJABoK

Color Inspiration: Marc Jacobs Fall/Winter ’18 collection

Color Inspiration: Marc Jacobs Fall/Winter '18 Show

I’m always looking for inspiration for my projects and the world of fashion is always fertile ground to draw from. Last week, Marc Jacobs showed his FW18 collection at New York Fashion Week and it was a stunning affair. He sent down the runway a love letter to 1980’s haute couture, made up of exaggerated over coats, layers of scarves, and dramatic hats that transformed models into mysterious femme fatales.

What really spoke to me were the striking color combinations and the intense contrast of each piece that made the show all the more profound. The hues were vibrant and jewel-like, which radiated against deep shades of olive, plum, and blacks. The palette is certainly evocative of the 80’s but thanks to his styling and color pairings these look feel contemporary and of the now.

I’ve pulled swipe from Marc Jacobs personal and brand Instagrams to give a more comprehensive look of the output and the decisions that went into the clothes. I mean, how cool are the hairdos below? Those gradients are everything. Hopefully this sparks some ideas in your own work!

Color Inspiration: Marc Jacobs Fall/Winter '18 Show

Color Inspiration: Marc Jacobs Fall/Winter '18 Show

Color Inspiration: Marc Jacobs Fall/Winter '18 Show

Color Inspiration: Marc Jacobs Fall/Winter '18 Show

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Design for Rail – the story of the Railfreight identity

Britain’s railways of the 1980s were a mess, figuratively and physically. Grimy trains streamed in and out of depots, through under-invested stations and between industries just about grappling with the new global economy in which they found themselves. To many, including British Rail’s clients, things were not looking good.

But the grime and dirt of the freight sector masked the fact that this was the most profitable part of BR. The goods business had seen a resurgence: the Railfreight sector had been reorganised into specialised subsectors including Distribution, Coal, Petroleum, Metals and Construction, and each was showing growth.

Two previous BR identity projects had not helped the outward image of freight. The BR Corporate Design Guidelines (the subject of a meticulous reprint by designer Wallace Henning and funded by Kickstarter) enforced strict rules of colour, type, imagery and logos to a degree never seen before on a transport network. It, along with a comprehensive investment in systems and process, helped unite BR’s motley collection of stations, stock and assets as a single entity.

Insignia in use as part of Roundel’s 1987 identity for Railfreight

It led to the painting of all locomotives in BR blue, with yellow warning-panel ends, almost without exception. Every size and shape of loco went that way; even the three steam engines run by BR on the Vale of Rheidol Railway in Wales had the BR-blue and white double arrows slapped on the side. But it stamped out individuality and also the pride in the mechanical iron horses that hauled the trains and that were once so cared for by depot staff.

A second rebranding, for the Railfreight division carve-out in 1982, led to all locos allocated for these services to be painted dark grey, with yellow ends and red stripe. The greyness was explicitly there to hide the dirt; there was no need to wash these hulking beasts any more. With greyness and with tiredness the strong regional and local identities that were important to rail workers had also begun to dry up.

Photograph by Lee Funnell

BR had to convince industry that its approach and its teams were not grubby steam-age dinosaurs (even if some of its locomotives were) and that they were a force to be reckoned with against the rising tide of road haulage. Privatisation was being mooted in Westminster, and BR knew that it had to sharpen up in a commercial world as the world around it moved. Similarly, within, there was a need to galvanise the workforce, but there didn’t seem to be a plan.

Mike Denny, formerly Creative Director of Roundel Design and self-confessed railway enthusiast, explained how the brief came about.

“We’d had a call to work on a small livery project for a Class 37 [a medium-sized BR freight locomotive],” he says. “But it became quite clear that this needed to work as something bigger; more widespread. The team at the BR Architecture & Design Division told us that we were pushing on an open door – so we effectively wrote our own brief.”

The Roundel team mooted a couple of creative approaches including what Denny tantalisingly refers to as a “bit of a Dan Dare style” route, but rapidly landed the now-iconic theme.

“We realised we could keep it simple, but layer it,” he says. “You’ve got British Rail at the top of the identity. You know it’s British Rail – it had to be – it was the only operator! We did give a nod by using their Rail Alphabet typeface to provide consistency with the passenger trains, too.

“Next down is the operating division, so you’ve got the locos and wagons painted in our triple-grey for Railfreight. You didn’t need to have the word ‘Railfreight’ plastered over it – we had confidence that people could tell them apart by colour from the passenger locos at speed. Next we divided it by subsector of operation by using squadron-style marking, then by depot, and then finally the locomotive number, or quite often, name. That gave a really personal feeling.”

Photograph by Lee Funnell

The subsector squadron marks were inspired by air force markings – particularly those from the Polish Air Force – as Roundel and the team at BR realised the need to bring teams together under manageable and identifiable groups.

Each of the final six squadron marks in blue or red with yellow, incorporating a stylised ‘F’, were designed with paint and scraperboard and tested in large formats. The squadron concept was perfect – the antithesis of the grubby past – bright battle shields showing a confident and optimistic future. It was immediately obvious that these worked at a distance on locomotives crossing the country and up close on print ephemera, buildings and uniforms.

Squadron mark as part of Roundel’s 1987 identity for Railfreight, complete with stylised ‘F’

Next were the depot plates; the badges of honour. Produced in bright chromium they reflected the allocation of each locomotive and gave staff both ownership and their own local identity again.

A masterstroke was getting each depot team to nominate their preferred icon which was then styled by Roundel, avoiding a top-down implementation that may well have fallen on deaf ears. The icons were installed not just on locos – which now rewarded a good clean – but throughout stationery, notice boards, depot signs and even mugs.










It should be noted that the love for this identity was not universal; to some died-in-the-wool rail enthusiasts or to staff who had seen many of the diesel locomotives since the 1950s having new heraldry emblazoned on the side of them there was a reckoning that they looked a bit odd.

Some pointed out that quite often a loco diagrammed for a coal train might end up working a long line of petrol tankers, thus rendering the squadron mark incongruous to the casual observer. But those were tiny operational issues – what mattered was the overall effect.

And it worked: business customer feedback was overwhelmingly positive, staff almost entirely welcomed it and Railfreight won FT and BBC awards for cultural change.

It was with a little sadness therefore that this postmodern identity lasted but a few years, when it was replaced by the incoming corporate tide of UK rail privatisation. Depot and sector allegiances disappeared; a new world had dawned. New liveries, new logos, new identities.

So, more than 30 years on, to the exhibition at the D&AD today. This surprising but welcome retrospective came about after one of the ex-Roundel team (now Creative Director of SEA Design), Bryan Edmondson, was pleased to read an article cheerleading the graphic design success of the old identity about eighteen months ago.

Photograph by Lee Funnell

He convinced Mike Denny and a raft of ex-Roundel colleagues that now, three decades after the identity was launched, was the time for a retrospective and contributions from all of both artifacts and memories came flooding in.

Perhaps the nostalgia cycle has swung in because those involved are now reaching professional maturity, perhaps it’s because there’s a renewed interest in rail transport in current affairs, or perhaps there’s a resurgent interest in corporate identities that represent organisations that were centralised and integrated.

Photograph by Lee Funnell

Design for Rail is located in the D&AD Exhibition room, a large basement space in Shoreditch. The SEA Design team has clearly laboured love on this: previously hand-drawn symbols have been recreated and printed large across pillars and wall panels.

Huge bright replicas of the subsector identities stretch around the room and freight train imagery from the quite extraordinary night-time calendar photoshoots (all taken on working railway lines, occupied for a night by crews and then up-lit in the most remarkable ways) are projected on a large screen.

Photograph by Lee Funnell

Four display cases of objects show the breadth of the identity as implemented. One contains the introductory letters from the BR client at the time plus some elements of printed guidelines and ephemera. Other cases display chromium depot plates and layout guides for applying the identity to various locomotive types. A lavishly printed exhibition catalogue accompanies the displays, containing some exquisitely produced artwork.

Photograph by Lee Funnell

This is an exhibition created by a brilliant design team with much affection, but it does lack significant interpretation of the objects assembled for display as a museum exhibition might. A little more interpretation of these objects in location would help tease out of some of the fascinating stories behind them, rather than let them stand by themselves.

To dig deeper – for example to find out more of the great role that Jane Priestman and Colin Driver played as clients at British Rail, how the photographs were staged, the processes that the Roundel team used to get to the identity or the practicalities of how the identity was implemented – will benefit any visitor looking up online afterwards.

Overall Design for Rail is a greatly appreciated retrospective; a deserved elevation of an underestimated British brand identity, a welcome reveal to a wider audience beyond design rail enthusiasts who have enjoyed it for so long, and well worth a visit.

Tim Dunn is a transport historian and broadcaster (see @MrTimDunn). Design for Rail is on show at D&AD, 64 Cheshire Street, London E2 6EH until February 26 and is curated by SEA. See designforrail.co.uk

The post Design for Rail – the story of the Railfreight identity appeared first on Creative Review.

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Kate Ballis’ ‘Infra Realism’ series captures Palm Springs in an alien way

Kate Ballis' 'Infra Realism' photo series

If you combine Palm Springs, my favorite Los Angeles getaway location, and pair it with fluorescent shades of pinks, purple, and reds, you’ll grab my attention in a heartbeat. Kate Ballis, an Australian photographer who considers herself an “aestheticist,” creates pieces that capture and explore the natural world in a grounded, but other-worldly fashion.

Her series Infra Realism does exactly that, taking the arid deserts and lush mid-century homes of the Palm Springs area and captures them with infrared film. The result is a version of the city that looks like a Star Trek acid trip (I mean that in the best way possible!). Here’s her take, from last year’s interview with Another Magazine:

“Before this I produced the Glace Noir series, which is very dark and mysterious.” These images use a similar subversion by representing vast glaciers in a palette of inky blacks and blues. “Both projects actually have a lot in common, it’s about representing this otherworldliness, and infrared has simply given me another tool to express what I was already exploring.”

You can see more of Kate’s photography by clicking here.

Kate Ballis' 'Infra Realism' photo series

Kate Ballis' 'Infra Realism' photo series

Kate Ballis' 'Infra Realism' photo series

Kate Ballis' 'Infra Realism' photo series

Kate Ballis' 'Infra Realism' photo series

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Photo Report: Watches & Wonders Miami 2018

20019065.jpg?ixlib=rails 1.1

Last weekend, the Miami Design District was the center of the watch world in North America as it hosted the very first Watches & Wonders Miami. Organized by the Miami Design District and the Fondation de la Haute Horlogerie (FHH), this edition of Watches & Wonders (which in previous years has taken place in Hong Kong) was an opportunity for watch lovers to discover both the boutiques, shops, and hospitality of the Design District, as well as, for many of the participating brands, new watches just introduced in January at the 2018 SIHH. A gala opening night event, attended by over 1,000 guests (including, of course, many HODINKEE readers) was followed by three days of events, including lectures and panel discussions on a wide range of subjects, including the basics of how a mechanical watch works, aspects of collecting and investing, complications, and more.

Guests were also treated to the Miami Design District Concours, with a truly remarkable lineup of both vintage and new automobiles, and were also able to view special lots in the upcoming Phillips Daytona Ultimatum auction (as well as a watch that once belonged to Elvis Presley). And, of course, many of you were there sporting your favorite timepieces, and were kind enough to share them with us. 

Red Bar founder Adam Craniotes.

<p>Watchmaking demonstration at A. Lange &amp; Söhne.</p>

Watchmaking demonstration at A. Lange & Söhne.

<p>Leading a watchmaking class, at Jaeger-LeCoultre.</p>

Leading a watchmaking class, at Jaeger-LeCoultre.

The new-for-2018 Lange & Söhne Saxonia Copper Blue.

The Bulgari Magsonic Grande Sonnerie: a tourbillon, minute repeater, and grande sonnerie with Westminster chimes.

Opening night watch browsing at Jaeger-LeCoultre.

Vintage Jaeger-LeCoultre Memovox Polaris.

The 2018 Parmigiani Fleurier Kalpagraphe Chronometre, at the Parmigiani Fleurier boutique.

There were many truly memorable automobiles at the Concours, from timeless vintage cars, to modern supercars.

The TAG Heuer boutique featured a wonderful collection of vintage Heuer watches, including some rarely seen quartz LCD models from the 1970s.

<p>Heuer Autavia "Dark Lord" 1975</p>

Heuer Autavia "Dark Lord" 1975

<p>A 1974 Autavia GMT, with caliber 14</p>

A 1974 Autavia GMT, with caliber 14

<p>A Heuer Microsplit split seconds wrist timer, 1978, with waterproof case and fabric strap</p>

A Heuer Microsplit split seconds wrist timer, 1978, with waterproof case and fabric strap

<p>A Heuer Senator analog-digital quartz chronograph, 1977</p>

A Heuer Senator analog-digital quartz chronograph, 1977

<p>A Heuer Carrera, 1970, with caliber 11</p>

A Heuer Carrera, 1970, with caliber 11

A selection of independent watch brands exhibited as well, including, among others, Kari Voutilainen and F. P. Journe.

Phillips’ Paul Boutros showed us some upcoming pieces which will be on the block for the Daytona Ultimatum and Geneva Watch Auction: 7 auctions.

<p>'The Ricciardi Panda' Rolex Daytona Reference 6263</p>

‘The Ricciardi Panda’ Rolex Daytona Reference 6263

<p>'Pintabian' Rolex Daytona Reference 6265 With Brown Sub-Dials</p>

‘Pintabian’ Rolex Daytona Reference 6265 With Brown Sub-Dials

<p>'The John Player Special' Rolex Daytona Reference 6241 In Yellow Gold</p>

‘The John Player Special’ Rolex Daytona Reference 6241 In Yellow Gold

<p>An unusual Breguet triple calendar chronograph, with moonphase, using the rare Valjoux 88 caliber; also unusual for its steel case. Coming up in the Geneva Watch Auction: 7.&nbsp;</p>

An unusual Breguet triple calendar chronograph, with moonphase, using the rare Valjoux 88 caliber; also unusual for its steel case. Coming up in the Geneva Watch Auction: 7. 

<p>The <a href="https://www.hodinkee.com/articles/elvis-presley-tiffany-dial-omega-phillips-geneva-auction-news" rel="noopener" target="_blank">Elvis Presley Omega</a></p>

The Elvis Presley Omega

<p>Watch expert and lifelong collector Paul Boutros, of Phillips</p>

Watch expert and lifelong collector Paul Boutros, of Phillips

One of the weekend’s events: a discussion and book signing with Matt Hranek, author of A Man And His Watch, and Revolution Magazine USA Editor in Chief Keith Strandberg, at the Vacheron Constantin boutique.

One of the most enjoyable aspects of the weekend, of course, was having a chance to meet HODINKEE readers, many of whom were kind enough to share their watches with us. It was amazing to see such a variety of tastes and timepieces, and it just goes to show you that HODINKEE readers have incredibly wide ranging tastes and interests. Getting together to share our common enthusiasm for watchmaking was a major highlight of Watches & Wonders Miami for us, and it was fantastic to be able to meet so many HODINKEE readers!

<p>Inside the Van Cleef &amp; Arpels boutique.</p>

Inside the Van Cleef & Arpels boutique.

The Hublot boutique

The Hublot Big Bang Sang Bleu.

<p>Vintage diver dress, at Panerai.</p>

Vintage diver dress, at Panerai.

A model of the V-12 engine of the Bugatti Chiron on display at the Parmigiani Fleurier boutique.

Thanks to Miami Design District and the Fondation de la Haute Horlogerie, and of course all our friends who joined us in Miami – hope to see you again next year!

Source: http://ift.tt/1IiKaDm