Aliments Faita et Forgione

Aliments Faita et Forgione

Stefano Faita, a nationally recognised personality, and his partner Michele Forgione, entrusted us to create the brand identity and packaging for their first line of ready-to-serve grocery products. Since October, shelves have been stocked with four varieties of canned tomato sauce (Tomato and Basil, Marinara, Arrabiata, and Rosée) featuring an eye-catching graphic design that breaks from the usual codes of the category.

“I wanted to give the products a tangible and pertinent presence, so they would stand out by the quality and simplicity of their ingredients and flavour, as well as their look. The agency has managed to capture my great love for Montréal, Italy, and family with an identity that is authentic and daring at several levels.”
— Stefano Faita, restaurant owner and businessman

It was a major challenge to differentiate the brand in this type of category, where all brands merge into one. The concept’s originality produced a real, appealing identity and packaging that leaps out. Stefano is himself a well-known brand, so the identity gives him a place with a lookalike caricature: jovial, energetic, colourful and attentive to detail.

Stefano Faita sauce range identity

Stefano Faita sauce range identity

This attention to detail is echoed in the labels graphic layout, which was developed around a polygon representing the geographic limits of Little Italy in Montréal and in the typographic treatment unique to each sauce. Nutritional and legal information is presented in an unusual vertical manner outside the shape.

Stefano Faita sauce range identity

Stefano Faita sauce range identity

Stefano Faita sauce range identity

Stefano Faita sauce range identity

Stefano Faita sauce range identity

Stefano Faita sauce range identity

Stefano Faita sauce range identity

Stefano Faita sauce range identity

Stefano Faita sauce range identity

Stefano Faita sauce range identity

Stefano Faita sauce range identity

The sauce brand and its four products are currently available at specialty grocery stores, Les Marchés Traditions, Rachelle-Béry, and at IGA supermarkets throughout Quebec.

Stefano Faita sauce range identity

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In Their Own Words – Kaley McKean

Canadian illustrator Kaley McKean shares with us the joys of working on children’s books and the fast pace of editorial.

I’m an illustrator and designer living in Toronto with my husband and fellow illustrator Nolan Pelletier.

I grew up on the prairies of southern Alberta in a city called Lethbridge. I had long planned to pursue illustration and so moved out to Toronto a little over 10 years ago to attend the Ontario College of Art and Design. In 2012, I received my Bachelor of Design in Illustration and have since been working as a freelancer.

Most of the work I do tends to be for magazines and newspapers, including clients such as Smithsonian, The New York Times, and Variety.

I’ve also just finished up a children’s book, my first, with Storey Publishing. That’s been my largest project to date, taking over a year to complete, and also one of the most rewarding.

The fast pace of editorial work is exciting and it’s fun seeing the work in print weeks or sometimes days later. However, being able to take the time to focus on developing the book was a really interesting change for me, and I learned a lot. I’m hoping to have the opportunity to work on more books in the near future. That being said, after having my hands full for so long it’s so nice to take time for a bit of personal work. Recently, I’ve been developing new print promos and experimenting with patterns.

My work is inspired by the natural world, folklore and history. I like to use a bright, minimal palette, of usually three to five colours. Though I work primarily in Photoshop, I also aim to incorporate a lot of hand-drawn shapes and textures in my work. My favourite non-digital mediums to work with are graphite and watercolour.

You can find me online at kaleymckean.com and on Instagram.

Look for Howl Like a Wolf!, an educational and creative play book all about animals and their behaviours by Kathleen Yale, out Spring 2018 from Storey Publishing.

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Walt Whitman on Beethoven and the Power of Music to Effect Full-Body Transcendence

In praise of the “dainty abandon” that awakens us to wonder and carries us outside ourselves.


Walt Whitman on Beethoven and the Power of Music to Effect Full-Body Transcendence

“Feeling, life, motion and emotion constitute its import,” philosopher Susanne Langer wrote of music, which she defined as “a highly articulated sensuous object.”

Although many great writers have contemplated the power of music, few have articulated it more perfectly or more sensuously than Walt Whitman (May 31, 1819–March 26, 1892) does in Specimen Days (public library) — the sublime collection of prose fragments and journal entries, which gave us Whitman on the wisdom of trees and which the poet himself described as “a melange of loafing, looking, hobbling, sitting, traveling — a little thinking thrown in for salt, but very little — …mostly the scenes everybody sees, but some of my own caprices, meditations, egotism.” And what a beautiful, generous egotism it is.

Walt Whitman circa 1854 (Library of Congress)
Walt Whitman (Library of Congress)

One cold February evening in the last weeks of his sixtieth year, having finally recovered from the stroke that had rendered him paralyzed for two years, Whitman treated himself to a concert at Philadelphia’s opera house and surrendered to the transcendent transport of music in a way that eclipsed every other musical experience he’d ever had, revealing to him the very essence of music’s power. Enraptured, he writes:

Never did music more sink into and soothe and fill me — never so prove its soul-rousing power, its impossibility of statement.

Particularly enchanted by the orchestral splendor of a Beethoven septet, Whitman meditates on whether music might be the purest and profoundest expression of nature:

I [was] carried away, seeing, absorbing many wonders. Dainty abandon, sometimes as if Nature laughing on a hillside in the sunshine; serious and firm monotonies, as of winds; a horn sounding through the tangle of the forest, and the dying echoes; soothing floating of waves, but presently rising in surges, angrily lashing, muttering, heavy; piercing peals of laughter, for interstices; now and then weird, as Nature herself is in certain moods — but mainly spontaneous, easy, careless — often the sentiment of the postures of naked children playing or sleeping.

The Gnomes: "He played until the room was entirely filled with gnomes."
One of Arthur Rackham’s rare 1917 illustrations for the fairy tales of the Brothers Grimm

Long before scientists illuminated why playing music benefits your brain more than any other activity, Whitman intuited the singular mind-body attunement of performance. More than a purely aural bewitchment, he revels in the full-body, creaturely delight of music — both of playing and of listening:

It did me good even to watch the violinists drawing their bows so masterly — every motion a study. I allow’d myself, as I sometimes do, to wander out of myself. The conceit came to me of a copious grove of singing birds, and in their midst a simple harmonic duo, two human souls, steadily asserting their own pensiveness, joyousness.

Specimen Days is a beautiful read in its totality. Complement this particular portion with German philosopher Josef Pieper on the source of music’s supreme power, Aldous Huxley on why it sings to our souls, and Wendy Lesser on how it helps us grieve, then revisit Whitman on the connection between the body and the spirit, why literature is central to democracy, and his timeless advice on living a vibrant and rewarding life.


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The Phoenix of Equality: How Pioneering Firefighter Brenda Berkman Won Women’s Right to Herosim

“My uniform is emblematic of my philosophy that people should try to leave the world better than they found it.”


The Phoenix of Equality: How Pioneering Firefighter Brenda Berkman Won Women’s Right to Herosim

“No woman should say, ‘I am but a woman!’ But a woman! What more can you ask to be?” pioneering 19th-century astronomer Maria Mitchell told her students as she paved the way for women in science. And yet a century later, Brenda Berkman found embers of that but-a-woman cavil smoldering in the innermost chamber of culture, and she set out to extinguish them with unexampled fortitude of spirit.

Berkman, now an artist in her sixties, was once a lawyer before becoming one of the first women firefighters on the New York force, where she initiated and won — at great personal cost — a landmark lawsuit that forever changed the face of the fire department and became a precedent for equality far beyond its locale. Berkman recounts the hard-earned triumph through the lens of her uniform in one of the sixty-eight stories in Emily Spivack’s altogether wonderful Worn in New York (public library) — the continuation of Spivack’s Worn Stories, one of the most rewarding books of 2014, unraveling the tapestry of cultural and personal histories that make us who we are through the storytelling thread of sartorial micro-memoirs.

Brenda Berkman’s uniform. (Photograph by Bon Jane for Worn in New York by Emily Spivack, published by Abrams Books.)

Berkman tells Spivack:

I have this photograph of myself and a group of girls who were all editors of my high school’s newspaper in Richfield, Minnesota, dressed in the boys’ baseball team uniforms. To most people, that photo was a spoof or joke, but to me, it was serious. It was an example of what I wanted to be, but couldn’t be, because I was a girl. Throughout my childhood I had been a tomboy. My mother had signed me up for Little League because I wanted to play baseball. When the coach found out I was a girl, he turned me down. So the idea of wearing a uniform, especially a uniform to play a sport, got stuck in my mind as something honorable and desirable.

Berkman came of age in an era of woefully gendered career opportunities, with girls groomed to be teachers, nurses, or secretaries — if they weren’t full-time wives, that is — and boys prepared for positions of power in law, commerce, and government. She did get married, but refused to accept the limiting career paths before her. After college, she took a job in her father-in-law’s law firm and saw him represent the women of the NYPD in a sex discrimination lawsuit, which inspired her to apply to law school so that she could fight for equality herself.

When Berkman entered the NYU law school at the height of the feminist movement, she found herself seated next to a young man who was a “fire buff” — a person she defines as “someone who may or may not be a firefighter but knows everything about the fire department.” Around that time, she began running marathons and discovering the strength of her physical being. These two new strands of thought twined into the idea of becoming a firefighter.

“Once we begin to feel committed to our lives, responsible to ourselves,” Adrienne Rich asserted in her fantastic 1977 convocation speech, “we can never again be satisfied with the old, passive way.” That year — Berkman’s first year of law school — the firefighter test opened for women for the first time. But there was a cruel twist — this was also the year New York City instituted the harshest physical abilities test ever required of firefighters, which included a number of physical tasks having little to do with what it actually takes to fight fires. Berkman took and aced the written portion of the test but failed the physical, even though she had trained for it by carrying her husband up and down flights of stairs — the kind of activity firefighters would actually need to perform on duty.

She recounts:

Not a single one of the ninety women who passed the written exam passed the physical one.

I needed to do something about that. None of us were asking that standards be lowered merely because we were women. We were asking that the standards be job-related and that women be given a fair opportunity to meet those standards. I sued, maintaining that the exam was not job-related and that it disccriminated against women. About four years later, I won the lawsuit.

Even at the beginning of my career, my fire department uniform symbolized my right, and all women’s right, to be a firefighter.

But that right was assaulted less than a year later, when Berkman was fired for alleged lack of physical ability — even though her performance was consistently in the top tier of every task the fire department had given women. When she returned to her firehouse on the Lower East Side to collect her belongings, the male firefighters wouldn’t speak to her. As she exited in silence, they began clapping. Far more heartbreaking for Berkman than the demonstrative humiliation, however, was the fact that she was no longer allowed to wear the uniform for which she had fought so hard.

Later that year, together with another woman who had been fired under the same pretext, Berkman sued the city to get their jobs back. She won the lawsuit, was assigned to a new firehouse in Harlem, and went on to serve her city for a quarter century before retiring with three citations of honor pinned to her captain’s uniform — one for a difficult fire in a tenement (a citation the still-embittered men in the department wanted to decline because Berkamn’s name was on it), one for a construction collapse during her tenure as lieutenant, and the third for her work at World Trade Center on 9/11, where she arrived as an off-duty firefighter just as the second tower was collapsing and toiled around the clock for days.

Looking back on her hard-earned chance at heroism, Berkman tells Spivack:

I am part of a tradition that’s self-sacrificing and service-oriented — in the middle of the night, in all weather, twenty-four hours a day, 365 days a year. And it’s a way of serving your country without having to shoot people, which appealed to me. My parents raised me to believe that you are not put on Earth just to take up space. My uniform is emblematic of my philosophy that people should try to leave the world better than they found it.

Complement this fragment of the throughly fantastic Worn in New York — which features stories by Eileen Myles, Gay Talese, Jenji Kohan, Jenna Lyons, Lena Dunham, and Thelma Golden — with a modern manifesto for bravery and perseverance by one of San Francisco’s first women firefighters, then revisit astronaut Sally Ride in conversation with Gloria Steinem about what it was like to be the first American woman in space, the story of how astrophysicist Cecilia Payne became the first woman to chair a Harvard department, and this illustrated celebration of trailblazing women in science.


donating = loving

Bringing you (ad-free) Brain Pickings takes me hundreds of hours each month. If you find any joy and stimulation here, please consider becoming a Supporting Member with a recurring monthly donation of your choosing, between a cup of tea and a good dinner.


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New Art Prints by Mike Sutfin and Brandon Holt from THE VACVVM (Onsale Info)

THE VACVVM will release copies of new art prints by Mike Sutfin and Brandon Holt tomorrow. The info is listed below. These go up tomorrow (Friday, November 17th) at 2pm Central Time. Visit THEVACVVM.com.

“Fight No More” by Mike Sutfin

12″ x 18″ Screenprint, Edition of 40, $35:

Mike Sutfin

Mike Sutfin

Mike Sutfin

“Fight No More” (Blue Variant) by Mike Sutfin

12″ x 18″ Screenprint, Edition of 40, $35:

Mike Sutfin

Mike Sutfin

Mike Sutfin

“Swallow” by Brandon Holt

14″ x 16″ Screenprint, Edition of 70, $40:

Brandon Holt

The post New Art Prints by Mike Sutfin and Brandon Holt from THE VACVVM (Onsale Info) appeared first on OMG Posters!.

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New Posters by Drew Struzan, Marc Aspinall, Phantom City Creative, Rich Kelly, and Ise Ananphada from Mondo (Onsale Info)

Mondo will release a large batch of posters from MondoCon tomorrow. Information on each is below. They go up Thursday, November 16th at a random time. Visit Mondotees.com.

Bride of Frankenstein by Drew Struzan

18″ x 24″ screenprint, edition of 150, $100:

drew struzan

Frankenstein by Drew Struzan

18″ x 24″ screenprint, edition of 150, $100:

drew struzan

Hot Fuzz by Rich Kelly

24″ x 36″ screenprint, edition of 300, $50:

Rich Kelly

Goodfellas by Marc Aspinall

24″ x 36″ screenprint, edition of 225, $50:

Marc Aspinall

Batman: Mask of the Phantasm (Variant) by Phantom City Creative

24″ x 36″ screenprint, edition of 175, $70:

Phantom City Creative

Labyrinth (Variant) by Ise Ananphada

24″ x 36″ screenprint, edition of 150, $75:

Ise Ananphada

The post New Posters by Drew Struzan, Marc Aspinall, Phantom City Creative, Rich Kelly, and Ise Ananphada from Mondo (Onsale Info) appeared first on OMG Posters!.

Source: http://omgposters.com