Triangular Cabin Opens Up to Lake Views in Canada

This captivating A-frame cabin located in the woodlands of St Adolfe d’Howard, in Canada, was rehabilitated by Jean Verville Architecte to meet the living needs of their clients, a family with a passion for the outdoors.

“The cottage was built in the 1960s on an enchanting site of the Laurentians,” the architects said. “Once the interior demolished and the structure completely cleared from the inside, the design team exploited the triangular structural form to develop a new layout that provides a relaxing feeling for this family retreat away from urban frenzy.”

Rhythmic and playful, the layout of the 64 square-meter (690 square-foot) hut encourages family interaction. The double-height open living space adjoins a compact kitchen area and floor-to-ceiling windows ensure unobstructed forest views.

The girls’ den upstairs offers a huge storage platform under the beds, always ready to welcome entertainment. This room all dressed in wood reveals a fascinating place entirely dedicated to childish games away from the living spaces on the ground floor.

A window positioned on the floor of the master bedroom enhances the brightness of the kitchen area below while offering a view of the lake from the bed.

Information provided by Jean Verville Architecte; photography courtesy of Maxime Brouillet.

The post Triangular Cabin Opens Up to Lake Views in Canada appeared first on Freshome.com.

Source: https://freshome.com

Meret Pro

Meret Pro is a straightforward typeface for newspapers and so much more. At home in tight columns and dense leading, is it another monster for text? Yes! Long after other typefaces have gone home, Meret Pro will roll up its sleeves and set word after word, line after line and column after column.

Where Pensum Pro mixes the broad nib with the brush, Meret Pro’s refined shapes balance the broad nib with the pointed pen. The result: a typeface that is at once hardy and refined. Its wide range of eight weights include four geared for text (light, regular, book, medium) and give enough variety for complex editorial typography. Vivid display styles and unpretentious italics give the typeface the flexibility for serious and modern typography that demands frankness.

For Meret, a typeface fine-tuned to contemporary typographic requirements, one set of figures is not enough! Meret’s almost serif-less figures come in five styles, each with matching tabulars. For tiny text sizes, the default figures are drawn slightly taller than the x-height; making them strong enough for tricky conditions and unobtrusive enough that they do not distract. And, of course, there are also lining figures and — for romantics — classic oldstyle figures. As it’s a TypeMates font, there are also all the small cap figures and superiors you could possibly want.

With more than a thousand glyphs and lots of OpenType features, Meret can fulfil every typographic need. For lovers of book typography, the small caps are wider than the caps and you will find punctuation in case and small-cap sensitive variations. Meret’s Adobe Latin 3 encoding is a TypeMates standard and gives a wide range of flexibility for Latin language support.

After being initially released with OurType in 2011, Nils Thomsen’s Meret Pro has now been republished with TypeMates. With this release comes an update: Meret Pro’s forms and features have been subtly remastered; additional experience improving a tried and tested design.

Meret is a winner of the Letter.2 type design competition organized by the Association Typographique Internationale in 2011, was one of Typographica’s Notable Releases in 2011, and won a Commarts Excellence Award in 2012.

Designer: Nils Thomsen
Publisher: TypeMates
Tweet: twitter.com/TypeMatesFonts/

Prices:
Single Style, starting at € 59 (incl. german taxes)
Complete Family, starting at € 339 (incl. german taxes)
Intro offer for complete Family: 50% off => € 169,50 (incl. german taxes)

Buy at TypeMates:
https://www.typemates.com/fonts/meret-pro

Try before you buy. All weights. For free.
https://www.typemates.com/fonts/meret-pro#try

More to read:
https://www.typemates.com/news/making-of-meret-newspaper-font
https://www.typemates.com/news/meret-pro-for-fast-company

Source: http://ift.tt/ABlnBb

Introducing: The IWC Tribute To Pallweber Edition ‘150 Years’

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Quick Take

Watchmaking in Switzerland takes place largely in the Francophone regions of the Jura and Geneva, but IWC’s presence in German-speaking Schaffhausen seems to have infused it with Germanic horological values – especially solidity and reliability. The pocket watch tradition at IWC was a strong one, and with this new pocket watch – a very faithful, though not exact, version of the traditional Pallweber pocket watches from the late 1800s – IWC returns to pocket watch production once again.

Why This Watch Matters

The Pallweber is one of the most distinctive pocket watches that IWC made – in fact it’s one of the company’s most distinctive watches ever, and for the 2018 SIHH, the company announced it would be returning this jumping hours and minutes complication to production. The wristwatch model was announced just before the SIHH, but the pocket watch wasn’t unveiled until the opening of the show. In looks and feel, it’s a classic piece of Swiss-German horology: an engraved but not overly ornate gold case, a movement that’s well finished and constructed, but not given the jewel-like treatment more characteristic of French-Swiss watchmaking, and an overall sense of weighty physical and horological presence.

Initial Thoughts

For some more recent IWC enthusiasts this will be a somewhat difficult watch to understand, but if you’re a long-time fan, you’re probably going to be thrilled to see IWC get back into the pocket watch business. It’s a small-scale but significant start and one that marks IWC’s reconnecting to its roots after many years of innovation in terms of design, complications, and also its role in the larger horological universe. It was a very satisfying moment for me to hold this in my hands. I’ve always felt that it’s important for a watch company – especially one with a real heritage, like IWC – to make it possible to own a physical manifestation of that history. This isn’t to say you should take it to unrealistic extremes – I would be the last person to suggest that Vacheron Constantin should get back into the cylinder escapement business – but a high-grade pocket watch with an interesting complication from IWC is definitely reason to cheer.

The Basics

Brand: IWC
Model: Pallweber Pocket Watch Tribute To Pallweber Edition "150 Years"
Reference Number: 505101

Diameter: 52mm
Thickness: 14.2mm
Case Material: 18k red gold
Dial Color: white lacquer
Indexes: printed display disks
Lume: none
Water Resistance: 1 bar
Strap/Bracelet: none; 18k red gold chain

The Movement

Caliber: IWC manufacture, caliber 94200
Functions: jumping hours and minutes
Power Reserve: 60 hours
Winding: manual
Frequency: 28,800 vph
Jewels: 54
Additional Details: the Pallweber variant of the 94000 family, which is the base for many high complications from IWC which require extra energy, including the Portugieser Sidérale Scafusia.

Pricing & Availability

Price: Not yet announced
Availability: TBD
Limited Edition: yes; 50 pieces worldwide.

For more click here.

Source: http://ift.tt/1IiKaDm

9h Capsule Hotel Launches New Sauna Hotel

9h is stylish and futuristic take on Japan’s capsule hotels. Featuring tiny pods large enough for just 1 person to sleep, 9h has proven popular and has since grown to 6 different locations since launching in 2010. Now, they’re hoping to reach an even broader clientele by adding a sister brand ℃ (pronounced do-she) that […]

Source: http://ift.tt/zlrR8Y

9h Capsule Hotel Launches New Sauna Hotel

9h is stylish and futuristic take on Japan’s capsule hotels. Featuring tiny pods large enough for just 1 person to sleep, 9h has proven popular and has since grown to 6 different locations since launching in 2010. Now, they’re hoping to reach an even broader clientele by adding a sister brand ℃ (pronounced do-she) that […]

Source: http://ift.tt/zlrR8Y

Spaceship art by B S

Spaceship environment painting by our good friend B S.


Keywords: large submarine over forest land planet concept spaceship environment digital painting illustration design by b s artstation.com portfolio image sample Source: http://ift.tt/pzChxX

New Plant-Based Embroidery and Interconnected Baskets by Ana Teresa Barboza

Peruvian artist Ana Teresa Barboza has previously been drawn to recreating full landscapes with yarn and thread, embroidering large tapestries with rivers, valleys, and waves that spill out from the wall and rest on the floor. Barboza continues her exploration of installation-based tapestry with a new body of work that charts the growth of individual plants, while also expanding her practice into weaving with a new work of interconnected baskets.

Her series Increase charts a plant’s shadow for 15 days, steadily tracing its growth and movement over the two week time space. Balls of yarn lay at the foot of each tapestry, providing a visualization of the diminishing material as it is slowly added to the changing portrait. The colorful embroidery provides a charged glow around the white space of the original plant, its increasing mass illustrated in a collage of jagged shapes and vibrant hues.

Barboza’s new work United Baskets, retreats from color altogether, instead focusing on process and shape. The piece is a collection of seven interconnected baskets, which took the artist 30 days to weave from bundles of Huacho reed. The series of vessels vary in size and position, yet are each seamlessly linked throughout the full 10 by 10 foot composition.

Although Barboza now works with textiles, she previously studied painting at Lima’s Pontifical Catholic University. You can see more of her embroidered and woven installations on her website here.

Source: http://ift.tt/odnItH

This 16-yo and her team built a $100 Oculus VR clone and free SDK

One sixteen year-old, a couple of her friends, and their math teacher have taken on Oculus with an open SDK – and you can build the VR headset for $100.

France’s Maxime Coutté writes up the project, which features her coding alongside optics and code from her best friends and algorithmic assistance from their math teacher (really). And there are a few advantages of their open approach, even if the hardware doesn’t look quite as svelte as commercial options.

1. There’s an open SDK, which for now gets you up and running quickly in Unity Game Engine.
https://github.com/relativty/fastVR-sdk

2. There’s an open API for communications between Unity and the VR headset – which also allows low-latency communication between the game engine and Arduino.
https://github.com/relativty/wrmhl

3. There’s a headset that’ll run you somewhere around $100, instead of several times that for similar options. And of course you’ll get the fun of building it. And it’s open.

That WRHML creation could be a great option for anyone adding real-time interfaces for Unity, including musical and audiovisual applications. And wow, does this ever beat fighting over the cool table at the cafeteria – Maxime writes:

I started programming when I was 13, thanks to my math teacher. Every Monday and Tuesday, my friends and I used to go to his classroom to learn and practice instead of having a meal at the cafeteria.

WRHML already looks useful, but if you want to build the headset, here you go:
How you can build your own VR headset for $100

You might even get parts for less. The basic ingredients: Arduino DUE, a display, an acceleromter/gyro, and a housing. Part of the cheapness is thanks to sourcing inexpensive displays from China directly (instead of buying a built product with its associated profit margin).

GitHub is your best source:

https://github.com/relativty/Relativ

Via T3n [German only]; h/t Martin Backes.

The post This 16-yo and her team built a $100 Oculus VR clone and free SDK appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Source: http://cdm.link

New Plant-Based Embroidery and Interconnected Baskets by Ana Teresa Barboza

Peruvian artist Ana Teresa Barboza has previously been drawn to recreating full landscapes with yarn and thread, embroidering large tapestries with rivers, valleys, and waves that spill out from the wall and rest on the floor. Barboza continues her exploration of installation-based tapestry with a new body of work that charts the growth of individual plants, while also expanding her practice into weaving with a new work of interconnected baskets.

Her series Increase charts a plant’s shadow for 15 days, steadily tracing its growth and movement over the two week time space. Balls of yarn lay at the foot of each tapestry, providing a visualization of the diminishing material as it is slowly added to the changing portrait. The colorful embroidery provides a charged glow around the white space of the original plant, its increasing mass illustrated in a collage of jagged shapes and vibrant hues.

Barboza’s new work United Baskets, retreats from color altogether, instead focusing on process and shape. The piece is a collection of seven interconnected baskets, which took the artist 30 days to weave from bundles of Huacho reed. The series of vessels vary in size and position, yet are each seamlessly linked throughout the full 10 by 10 foot composition.

Although Barboza now works with textiles, she previously studied painting at Lima’s Pontifical Catholic University. You can see more of her embroidered and woven installations on her website here.

Source: http://ift.tt/odnItH

New Plant-Based Embroidery and Interconnected Baskets by Ana Teresa Barboza

Peruvian artist Ana Teresa Barboza has previously been drawn to recreating full landscapes with yarn and thread, embroidering large tapestries with rivers, valleys, and waves that spill out from the wall and rest on the floor. Barboza continues her exploration of installation-based tapestry with a new body of work that charts the growth of individual plants, while also expanding her practice into weaving with a new work of interconnected baskets.

Her series Increase charts a plant’s shadow for 15 days, steadily tracing its growth and movement over the two week time space. Balls of yarn lay at the foot of each tapestry, providing a visualization of the diminishing material as it is slowly added to the changing portrait. The colorful embroidery provides a charged glow around the white space of the original plant, its increasing mass illustrated in a collage of jagged shapes and vibrant hues.

Barboza’s new work United Baskets, retreats from color altogether, instead focusing on process and shape. The piece is a collection of seven interconnected baskets, which took the artist 30 days to weave from bundles of Huacho reed. The series of vessels vary in size and position, yet are each seamlessly linked throughout the full 10 by 10 foot composition.

Although Barboza now works with textiles, she previously studied painting at Lima’s Pontifical Catholic University. You can see more of her embroidered and woven installations on her website here.

Source: http://ift.tt/odnItH