Groove Rider GR-16 1.2.5 brings more new features than are easy to list in a title

Groove Rider GR-16 only arrived at the end of December and already it’s had a bunch of updates, this being the 6th, and all in less than 2 months. I think that’s pretty impressive by any standards. This update comes with what looks like a load of user requested updates and features, plus the usual big fixes, although there aren’t too many of those to be honest.

Anyway, here’s the full list of what’s new in Groove Rider GR-16 1.2.5:

  • added IAA host sync with transport control support;
  • added an icon on the display, indicating that either Link or IAA sync is currently active;
  • velocity pads feature added (vertical and radial type), which can be turned on for specific part in the Part parameters menu;
  • SHIFT button’s touch area expanded;
  • now you can press Shift+Play to immediately play newly selected (blinking) pattern during playback without having to wait for current pattern to end;
  • added: in the Patterns selector, left-swipe pattern’s name to reveal the red “Init” button;
  • added: chain stop option for patterns chaining;
  • added: arpeggiator hold, tap the TouchPad with the second finger while holding the first one (or tap Shift+TouchPad as an alternative);
  • added step trigger conditions in the notes editor. They can be assigned to every note by changing the “Condition” parameter (previously called “Chance”);
  • tapping the BPM in the top header of display now immediately opens the pattern’s tempo parameter menu for convenience;
  • part color icon in the bottom right corner of display is replaced with the Mute icon, which indicates, if selected part is currently being muted or not. Tapping this icon will mute/unmute selected part without needing to enter the MUTE mode;
  • fixed: arpeggiator was gradually going out of sync with the pattern, if was played in the long run;
  • fixed: stems/audio export was incorrect when the Link sync was on and connected;
  • 8 new factory patterns added (“Back to the Roots” track), which contains new step trigger conditions written in its notes as an example;
  • lots of minimal bug fixes.

Groove Rider GR-16 costs $18.99 on the app store:

The post Groove Rider GR-16 1.2.5 brings more new features than are easy to list in a title appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Source: http://cdm.link

Manga Mondays ~ Nimura Daisuke

Japanese illustrator Nimura Daisuke was born in Osaka in 1978. He studied Visual Design at Osaka Municipal College of Design (OMCD) before beginning his illustration career.

He is well known for his GIF work such as “Ohayo-gozai-masu (Gooood-morniiiiing)!” and for illustrating the characters from the movie Fuku-chan Of Fukufuku Flats (2014). He is also the creative behind the joyful animations used to promote the Teradacho Festival in 2013. Recently, Nimura’s commercial work has included projects for a Japanese TV show, shopping mall, magazine editorials and adverts for big brands.

While Nimura’s playful GIFs have garnered international attention, his vibrant illustrations are also imbued with the same saucy humour. He captures the everyday silliness of characters dancing in their underwear, of fashionable crowds voguing and cool couples cycling against zesty backdrops. And at first glance his illustrations may seem cute but they possess a mischievous undertone. Nimura himself aims to create a “fun” and “entertaining” aesthetic for his audience whether it’s through animation or illustration.

You can find more of Nimura Daisuke’s work on Tumblr and Instagram.

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Flickr Heroes of the Week

Happy Monday! As per the usual, this was a tough decision but it has been made! The winners of this week’s Flickr Heroes challenge are ‘Ground’ by Mher Karapetyanon on Tumblr and Twitter & ‘Beautiful Beast’ by Ophelio Snaps on Facebook and Google+

Ground
Beautiful Beast (Explored 1/15/18)

Interested in having your photo featured as a cover image on our social media pages? Join the Flickr Heroes group!

The Honorable Mentions for the week are below:

The colour of the island
Luisa
Heron

If you want your photo to be considered for next week, submit your best images to the Flickr Heroes group pool by Monday morning. Winners are announced in the Flickr Heroes Group, on the blog, and across our social media accounts. Check them out before they change!

Flickr on Facebook

Flickr on Twitter

Flickr on Tumblr

Flickr on Instagram

Flickr on Google+

Source: http://blog.flickr.net

Black and White Figural Tattoos With a Macabre Twist by Korean Tattoo Artist Oozy

South Korean tattoo artist Woojin Choi, or Oozy, creates detailed black and white works which often incorporate a macabre twist. His fine line tattoos explore scenes that are not as innocent as they first appear, such as a geisha who partially hides her own skeleton behind a decorative fan, and a figure who is being lifted from (or dropped into) a bowl of Chashu ramen.

Oozy’s pieces are often very line-oriented, an effect that resonates with appearance of classic woodblock prints. The tattoo artist also associates this aesthetic with his background in animation, a subject he is currently majoring in at school. You can see more of the South Korea-based artist’s work on his Instagram.

Source: http://ift.tt/odnItH

Black and White Figural Tattoos With a Macabre Twist by Korean Tattoo Artist Oozy

South Korean tattoo artist Woojin Choi, or Oozy, creates detailed black and white works which often incorporate a macabre twist. His fine line tattoos explore scenes that are not as innocent as they first appear, such as a geisha who partially hides her own skeleton behind a decorative fan, and a figure who is being lifted from (or dropped into) a bowl of Chashu ramen.

Oozy’s pieces are often very line-oriented, an effect that resonates with appearance of classic woodblock prints. The tattoo artist also associates this aesthetic with his background in animation, a subject he is currently majoring in at school. You can see more of the South Korea-based artist’s work on his Instagram.

Source: http://ift.tt/odnItH

Black and White Figural Tattoos With a Macabre Twist by Korean Tattoo Artist Oozy

South Korean tattoo artist Woojin Choi, or Oozy, creates detailed black and white works which often incorporate a macabre twist. His fine line tattoos explore scenes that are not as innocent as they first appear, such as a geisha who partially hides her own skeleton behind a decorative fan, and a figure who is being lifted from (or dropped into) a bowl of Chashu ramen.

Oozy’s pieces are often very line-oriented, an effect that resonates with appearance of classic woodblock prints. The tattoo artist also associates this aesthetic with his background in animation, a subject he is currently majoring in at school. You can see more of the South Korea-based artist’s work on his Instagram.

Source: http://ift.tt/odnItH

Interview: Sébastien Perret and Guillaume Tripet Of Watch Design Agency Etude De Style

Dsc00963.jpg?ixlib=rails 1.1

Red and white-striped warning tape cautions me that I am entering a “confidential zone.” Of course it’s a bit of a joke, but a quick look around the office of Etude de Style makes me realize there is some serious secrecy going on: screens, sketches and 3D-models display half-finished designs for more brands than you can poke a stick at, including several that would swear – scout’s honor – that they have “never, ever used external designers.” The watch industry does have a love affair with nondisclosure agreements.

Etude de Style, based in the thousand-year-old city of Neuchâtel, is one of the best-known secrets in the watch world. It officially designs for HYT, H. Moser, Maurice Lacroix, Ebel, Christophe Claret, Mido, Krayon, Jacob and Co., Fabergé, and Audemars Piguet – and unofficially for many others. Around a bright red, stomach-high working surface in the center of the room, built from rough-chic MDF board, founder Sébastien Perret is conducting a morning briefing with the staff, after which he joins me and key account manager Guillaume Tripet in an adjacent meeting room, where we park ourselves on Eames DSW Fiberglass chairs. 

Entering the secret zone.

Anders Modig

How has watch design developed in the last decades?

Guillaume Tripet

The profession of watch designer is a new métier – before design was not really like it is today. The process was separated. Case makers designed the case; bracelet makers designed the bracelets, and so on – all completely independent of each other. Then the brands bought what they liked and put it all together. That was the first generation of watch design.

Anders modig

But there have been at least some designers supplying the look of the whole watch since the 1960s, right?

Sébastien Perret

Yes, the second generation of watch design was the period of a few individuals creating incredibly strong designs: people like Gérald Genta, Jorg Hysek and Eddie Schöpfer. These first designers of horology had individual books, catalogues of designs, with which they went to the brands to propose specific designs. Now we are in the third generation of watch design, where the designers are completely integrated in the whole product chain. Today a conceptual reflection is crucial in order to develop a strong design identity that is specialized for each brand and each collection. A Royal Oak must be a Royal Oak; a Bulgari Octo Finissimo is exactly that. You cannot take pieces from these and mix them into something new.  

Sébastien Perret during a staff briefing.

Anders modig

Then why is everybody running in the same direction? The watch industry is famous for being copycats, perhaps even more in the last five years when everything has taken this extreme vintage direction. 

GUILLAUME TRIPET

Yes, that’s a problem. Too often the initial brief is along the lines of: “We want to have a new watch – a little bit Audemars Piguet Royal Oak, little bit Patek Philippe Nautilus, Richard Mille and Hublot – try to make something like that, but for us.” Eighty percent of the people come to us with that type of outline!

Anders modig

Seriously!?

GUILLAUME TRIPET

Yes! [Laughs]

Anders Modig

Then what happens? 

GUILLAUME TRIPET

We explain that their brief is identical to what we received yesterday from another brand. We tell them that we have to go a little bit further.  

Krayon Everywhere is the only watch in the world that will tell you the time of sunrise and sunset wherever you are in the world, thus design elements reminiscent of the globe was included both on the dial and on details of the lavishly decorated movement.

Anders modig

The watches being referenced are those that, when they came out in the 1970s, ’80s and ’90s, were something special, disruptive, a new path. Why are they afraid of doing something new today?

GUILLAUME TRIPET

The problem today is that brands want something that is iconic from the beginning, but it is impossible to know on release if a watch will become an icon – they grow into this over time.  

Anders modig

Name a couple of recent watches that could become icons.

SÉBASTIEN PERRET

The J12 Ceramic from Chanel is on its way. The Octo Finissimo from Bulgari is also a good example that could reach the status of the Nautilus in a few decades. In the beginning, nobody liked the Octo Finissimo, but now it has become very big for Bulgari, and every collector wants an Octo.  

Among eye-catching 3-D printed models the H3 from HYT stands out. 

Anders Modig

Sébastien, you founded Etude de Style in 2002. You were alone then, and gradually the company has grown to 13 people. How would you describe the change in this period?

SÉBASTIEN PERRET

As I mentioned before, the designer is now part of the chain of production. And of course the industry has gone through a dramatic change in the 1990s and 2000s with the luxury groups Swatch, LVMH, and Richemont acquiring brands and creating vertical chains of management, production and distribution.  

Anders modig

What is the difference between designing for an independent brand and a big brand?

SÉBASTIEN PERRET

The quantity is different, the discourse is different, and finally the customer might be the same, but the way to convey the product to the final customer is totally different. If Max Büsser makes 20 watches with green dials, they will sell out because it is something new. Such brands should have exceptional shapes and designs, innovations and different colors and materials.

The team has the first look at the finalized Krayon Everywhere.

Anders modig

Still, I would claim that designs in general are getting less exciting. They are fitting perfectly in the chain for the next financial report, but have become less artistic. 

SÉBASTIEN PERRET

But it is more exciting than before! And we are not artists. We may have some artistic activities around our work, but design is more an artisanal craft than an artistic one in our opinion.  

Anders modig

You also have your own brand Tweed, financed with Kickstarter?

GUILLAUME TRIPET

Yes, since the beginning we said that at some point we would make something together for ourselves and not for a client. Tweed will be an accessory brand with products that cost up to 200 Francs, so as not to compete with our clients. These could be watches, mobile phones, jewelry, accessories…We already have a unique product in the charms, which can be put on one of our braided elastic straps very easily – punk spikes, skulls, small hearts, Swarovski crystals…the whole idea of Tweed is to be affordable for the client and fun for us. 

Tweed is Etude de Style’s own watch, financed through Kickstarter. 

Anders modig

How is it different to design a $100 watch rather than a $100,000 watch?

SÉBASTIEN PERRET

There is no difference. It is the same job.  

Anders modig

But shouldn’t the watch somehow communicate the difference in price? 

SÉBASTIEN PERRET

Yes, but it is not a question of design. It is the question of material, brands, the means of production. It is even more difficult to design a watch at 150 Francs.  

Anders Modig

Why is it more difficult?

SÉBASTIEN PERRET

Because the product must emit quality without having the same time to spend on each stage of production. Take two extreme examples: When you design a high end watch, you can design every detail, every screw the way you want as long as it makes sense and improves the collection. The brand can construct new machines or tools for production because even if every screw is going to cost 25 CHF it is not a big deal. But with a cheaper watch you have to come up with solutions employing existing tools, and the designer has to make sure that each part can be made with the lowest possible production costs.  

Guillaume Tripet explains the similarities and differences between designing expensive and affordable watches.

Anders modig

One of ingredients that most watch brands love to talk about is heritage. How do you treat heritage as a designer?

SÉBASTIEN PERRET

We have to distinguish two different things. There are some really serious brands with a real heritage and a real story behind them, and there are also a lot of other brands that do a lot of storytelling about heritage, but in fact there is not a lot to back it up. With real heritage like with Patek Philippe, AP or Vacheron Constantin the target for a designer is to come up with the next generation of a product at the right place within this huge history. The goal is not just to repeat the history, but to try to carry it forward in the right way. It is the same thing with Porsche. Today’s Porsche 911 is not like the first one Ferdinand Alexander Porsche conceived in the 1950s, but it has a clear identity and you can see the evolution. That is different from creating something totally new that is interesting, exciting. And it is always difficult. In both cases success will not be based only on the quality of the design; we are just a piece of the chain. It also comes down to the brand’s power in the areas of communication, distribution and awareness.  

A retired Mac spreads some joy in the office. 

Anders modig

How would you describe your design process?

GUILLAUME TRIPET

The first thing we do after receiving the client’s brief is to allow a period of reflection in order to define a frame. How important is the story of the brand? What position does it have on the market? What materials should be used? What is the price point? What are the commercial goals? Etcetera. With this we can develop text and mood boards and present some materials, types of straps, buckles and so on – anything that helps the client understand our ideas. The client must truly understand – otherwise our suggestions will be useless. Then we can start on the creation, which is in the end just a small part of the whole process of making a watch, perhaps 1 percent. A design agency today must be able to deliver technical drawings, 3D printing and have a product approach with huge insight into the technical side and production costs.  

Anders Modig

Why is so much design stuck in vintage styles at the moment?

GUILLAUME TRIPET

It’s not only horology. We are returning to simpler, more reassuring values everywhere. You see it in fashion and the hipster wave – the barbershops, cars, architecture, furniture. The clients don’t want to make a purchase just to have something; they want to be involved in what they buy. People are tired of . . . not technological devices, but they want everyday objects to be made of solid materials. I think that is why we are seeing so many watches with design inspirations from the 1960s and ’70s today. If I want to have a modern watch, I get an Apple. But if I get a classic watch, it gives me the feeling of a precious heritage, like it’s my grandfather’s watch. 

A retired Mac spreads some joy in the office. 

Source: http://ift.tt/1IiKaDm

A’ Design Awards & Competition – Call for Entries

Motif Wine by En Garde Interdisciplinary GmbH

Motif Wine by En Garde Interdisciplinary GmbH

 

Do you have a project you’re really proud of? Do you think it could win an award? Start off the New Year by taking a chance and entering the A’Design Awards, the largest design competition in the world. The annual event is held in Como, Italy and accepts entries for both conceptual and realized projects. Celebrating all areas of design, the competition is organized into 100 categories including Print Design, Visual Communication, Packaging, UI and UX, Photography and more. Entries will be evaluated by a grand jury panel composed of design professionals, academics, and members of the press from across the globe. Whether you’re a student or a professional, this contest is a unique opportunity to receive feedback on your work and obtain access to services that can help foster your career. To participate, register your designs before the deadline on February 28th.

 

Bengal Music Festical Poster by Shafiqul Alam

Bengal Classical Music Festival by Shafiqul Alam

Vania Nedkova & Elisava Pack

Lokum “Naslada” Packaging by Vania Nedkova & Elisava Pack

 

Dongdao Team

Pusonic Packaging by Dongdao Team

 

Textura Braille Smartphone by Isa Velarde

Textura Braille Smartphone by Isa Velarde

 

Mr. Pip's Double Cross Game Decor by Pip Tompkin Design
Mr. Pip’s Double Cross Game by Pip Tompkin Design

Saana Hellsten

Basik Packaging by Saana Hellsten

Jacobs Coffee Coffee Beans by Angela Spindler
Jacobs Coffee packaging by Angela Spindler

 

Albert Salamon

TTMM (after time) Watchface Apps Collection by Albert Salamon

Winning entries will be featured in a traveling gallery as well as an annual yearbook that will be distributed to the honorees. In addition, participants will receive networking opportunities, PR services, exclusive interviews, an invitation to the gala-night ceremony and much more. Tune in to Grain Edit on April 15th as select winners will be featured on the site.

Enter your work now before it’s too late. Good luck!

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This post was brought to you by the A’ Design Award & Competition which aims to recognize the best design work from around the world.

Interested in sponsoring Grain Edit? Visit our sponsorship page for more info.
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Also worth viewing:

World Design Rankings
Jay Fletcher
Studio Moss

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