Writing Derry Girls: Lisa McGee on making a hit Channel 4 sitcom

The February / March issue of Creative Review is all about humour. We talk to writers, designers and creatives using wit in their work, examine why humour fell out of fashion in advertising and explore what creative agencies can learn from practising stand up. We also have an interview with Lisa McGee – the writer and creator of the brilliant Channel 4 sitcom Derry Girls. Below is an extended version of our interview with McGee, in which she discusses her creative process, how she went from idea to script and the challenges of writing for comedy versus drama.

Lisa McGee’s Derry Girls will conjure up fond memories for anyone who grew up in the early 1990s. Its lead characters wear scrunchies and stonewash denim jackets, develop obsessions with aerobics and Pulp Fiction and listen to Salt N Pepa, Madonna and Supergrass.

The show captures the camaraderie and closeness of female friendships in a way that is rarely seen on TV. It also presents an alternative view of life in Northern Ireland during the Troubles. Its characters grow up against a backdrop of bomb scares and kidnappings but they go through the same dramas as any other teenager – from arguing with their ‘Ma’s to stressing about exams.

McGee had the idea for the show after writing London / Irish, a sitcom about four Northern Irish expats living in London. The series is inspired by her life – she grew up in Derry before moving to Belfast to study drama at The Queen’s University and the characters are loosely based on real people. “No one is 100 percent one person – they’re combinations of people,” she tells CR.

The show has been hugely successful. Two-and-a-half million people tuned in to watch the first episode within a week of its release and a second series was commissioned before episode two had aired. As McGee explains to CR, writing it was a labour of love…

Granda Joe (Ian McElhinney)

I’d never seen a true representation of what a group of girlfriends that age really get up to

Creative Review: How did the idea for Derry Girls come about?  

Lisa McGee: I had written another comedy [London/Irish] and I started thinking ‘what else?’ I liked the experience and knew I wanted to try something else funny and I’d always had this thought in the back of my head that I might want to write about my friends at school.

I’d never seen a true representation of what a group of girlfriends that age really get up to. It was always [girls being] obsessed with boys and self-image and all that sort of stuff and while there’s elements of that [in Derry Girls], we have a character who would do anything to get a good grade in her exams and we have egos and all these things that traditionally you only see in these young male comic characters.

I was interested in that first and creating that group of characters and once I found them, it just sort of went from there.

Orla McCool (Louisa Harland)

How did you go about getting the show made?

I have a very close relationship with two producers, Liz Lewin and Caroline Leddy…. Caroline and Liz are great because they really sort of trick you into writing the thing. [With Derry Girls], they would talk to me about my school days and my friends and before I knew it, I had created this world just by reminiscing and picking bits and piece. It was a very enjoyable process early on. It was a script that while I was writing other things, I wanted to go back to.

The script went through [several iterations]. At the start, I didn’t want to set it during the Troubles, because I thought it would get in the way of the comedy but then I started writing it and it didn’t feel truthful because I grew up during the Troubles – so I have no teenage experience outside of that. It just felt weirdly wrong.

When we had a script we showed it to a commissioner at Channel 4 called Nerys Evans – she’s left now but she’s brilliant – and she really liked the pilot script and commissioned the series.

“Writing the first episode of anything’s the toughest, I think”

It sounds dead quick when I say it like that but me writing that script was a long process. It took about a year and a half – two years maybe – from the initial idea to the final episode that Channel 4 would have read.

[Writing] the first episode of anything’s the toughest I think, because you don’t really know who the characters are, you don’t really know what the world is, you don’t know if it’s going to work or gel. But once you start to make it work and it all clicks together, the rest [is much easier]. I probably wrote the other five episodes in a few months but the first one took me a year-and-a-half.

How did you go about building the characters – and how much time did you spend developing them before you start writing the script?

I find you never really find out who the characters are until you start writing the dialogue, so I’ll work them up a bit and then I’ll put them in a scene together and see how they talk to each other and see what works and what doesn’t.

One thing that seemed to really work for Clare – the sort of nerdy, stressed-out friend of [lead character] Erin’s – was when she grassed people up … and that worked plot-wise as well. It’s interesting when those things help each other out and the character helps the plot rather than the other way around. With Michelle, for example [another friend of Erin’s], her mischievous streak often led them into story situations just because she wants to try something or she’s bored.

I think it’s always better to try and get the characters talking to each other so you can just sort of feel them as a group. You might end up tweaking one because it just doesn’t work in the gang.

“I like to start with a very basic A, B, C for the episode otherwise I wouldn’t be able to write”

How did you approach writing individual episodes? Did you start with an idea for an incident? So for example getting detention or trying to get a job? And build out scenes from there?

I always start with a story idea. That idea will change and you sharpen it up a bit as you go, but in episode one [which culminates with the death of a nun who is supervising the lead characters during an after-school detention], I always knew all these little things they were doing – Clare’s doing a fast, James needs to go to the loo and Erin wants to meet a boy – I knew I wanted it to lead up to them being accused of killing a nun.

Then you sort of just go on this path of trying to make it work and you take loads of wrong turns, but I like to start with a very basic ‘A, B, C’ for the episode otherwise I wouldn’t be able to write … I would feel like I had no map.

l-r: Granda Joe (Ian McElhinney), Sarah McCool (Kathy Clarke) Michelle Mallon (Jamie-Lee O’Donnell) and Erin Quinn (Saoirse Jackson)

Was the process very different to other series you’ve worked on? You were also a writer on BBC comedy-drama Being Humans and Channel 4 drama Indian Summers…

I’ve mostly done drama. Being Human was a comedy drama but it was still hour-long episodes and the focus of the stories was definitely more dramatic than comic.

It’s a completely different kind of torture getting that hour-long plot to work. In an hour-long show, it’s about making every act feel dramatic and engaging, because an hour’s a long time on TV. In a half-hour, you usually have too much material and you don’t have time to make it all work, so it’s a different kind of stressful.

The tough thing about comedy is that every line has to be funny. Every line is examined in a way that it just wouldn’t be in drama. The dialogue is so important and there’s a very definite aim: to make people laugh.

You can tell quite quickly if that’s not working when you’re in a read-through. In drama, if you have a good story and good characters, it’s always going to work, but if everyone’s sitting there [during a comedy read-through] and it’s tumbleweed, then you’re in trouble.

“I’d be very nervous going in to shoot something having not heard a room full of people’s reactions to it”

How do you go about testing whether scenes are funny? You must have a sense of whether something works while you’re writing it but how do you test whether it will resonate with viewers?

We had a very long audition process for casting the young people [in Derry Girls] so you hear a lot of things that way…. We then had chemistry read-throughs with the kids to make sure they were working as a gang and read-throughs with the whole cast.

You do have a sense [of whether something’s funny] – I always know if something’s not going to work but sometimes I think ‘I might get away with this’ and you never do. If there’s something dodgy about the joke or the setup up, I think it’s obvious when you hear it that there’s something not quite right.

So is that read-through process even more important in comedy?

I think it’s essential in comedy to do read-throughs in a way that it’s just not really in drama…. You need to hear where the laughter’s coming from and I’d be very nervous going in to shoot something having not heard a room full of people’s reactions to it.

Why do you think Derry Girls has been so popular?

I’m not sure. I think it’s different isn’t it? When you see [it’s set during] the Troubles, and it’s funny and it’s a group of mouthy girls – maybe it’s that. Also stuff on TV’s been a bit dark for a long time and there does seem to be a real appetite for comedy at the minute. I think the nostalgia thing plays a part as well. A lot of people in my generation are wanting to look back with fondness at that time before social media. It’s a combination of things really.

The response from people in Derry seems to be positive – were you nervous about how they would react to it?

You’re always a bit like ‘Oh God’ when you write anything but this was absolutely [terrifying] because it’s about a city that’s never been represented. It’s about my hometown and getting that wrong for me would have been heart breaking – but they seem to love it in Derry, thank God.

That was the main thing I was worried about: that people at home would say ‘I don’t like it’ or ‘that doesn’t feel truthful’. We had a small screening in Derry and once I knew people were happy enough I relaxed a bit because that’s what I had set out to do – to tell another side to the Troubles story.

Gerry Quinn (Tommy Tiernan) and Ma Mary (Tara Lynne O’Neill)

People really seem to recognise and identify with the world you’ve created in Derry Girls. What was the key to achieving that level of authenticity, do you think?

I think the main thing for me was trying to remember what I didn’t like about the representations of Northern Ireland and what used to annoy me as a teenager and all the things I used to wish people knew [about Derry].

[It was also] just really throwing myself back into that world and embracing it. It was lovely to do that – to think like a 15, 16-year-old again and think of what was important to you. These tiny things became your whole world – if your friend stopped talking to you it was the greatest tragedy on earth – and it was great to revisit all of that.

“It’s about truth – finding small stories that sit alongside big ones”

Derry Girls is rooted in a very specific place and time but speaks to pretty universal themes about growing up. How important was it to you to strike that balance while writing the show? 

What I wanted to say was that this might have been going on but we were all the same … every young person has a lot in common.

It’s also about truth and finding small stories that sit alongside big ones. So someone getting their van stolen by the IRA [something that happens in the series] and getting tied up [like Erin’s uncle does] and taking the chip shop order … those things happened every day and sat alongside each other.

Someone watching it in England might not understand the uncle getting tied up scene but they’ll understand the chip shop order.

l-r: Erin Quinn (Saoirse-Monica Jackson), James Maguire (Dylan Llewellyn), Michelle Mallon (Jamie-Lee O’Donnell)

Most of the show is pretty light hearted – the bomb scares and kidnappings seem more of an inconvenience than anything – but the final episode ended on a much more serious note. Why did you feel it was important to have a serious ending?

There were times when it was very serious and it wasn’t just an inconvenience. People died and it’s a small country so everyone in Northern Ireland was touched by that period of violence. I wanted to have a moment just to say ‘this was really, really serious’ and I thought I should do it at the end because you can’t come back from that.

I just felt I had to tell the truth if I’m going to do this show – that sometimes it was just horrendous for families. On the local news you were watching people like you – you were watching these awful things happening to them – and the fact that we were doing it to each other, it was just heartbreaking.

You studied drama and went on to work as a writer on attachment at the National Theatre. How did you get into writing for TV?

I’ve sort of always written. I was writing little stories when I was young and then I went to university and did a drama degree. To be honest … there was a lot of performance-focused stuff in it, and I knew I wasn’t going to be an actor, but I wrote a play when I was in third year and after that, I set up a drama company with a few other students. We put on a few plays in pubs in Belfast and one day, a film producer came to see one of those plays. I don’t know why he came, he was just staying above the pub I think, but he put me in touch with an agent and that was how I got into TV.

Alongside that I’d been sending plays to every theatre company and getting ‘thanks but no thanks’ back, and then the National Theatre invited me to come and talk to them and I did an attachment there because they liked one of my plays.

I think what doing plays gave me … was a confidence and a really strong voice

What lessons did you learn from writing for theatre?

I think what doing the plays gave me – and why I would advise people to think about that way in – was a confidence and a really strong voice. I didn’t even know this at the time but I think if I’d have gone in and my first writing experience had been writing on someone else’s show … I don’t know how it would have worked – me breaking out of that or having the confidence to say ‘no I have my own style and tone and things I want to say’.

I always wanted to go back and write another play … it’s just such a perfect little piece of who you are as a writer and there’s no interference really – or at least there shouldn’t be.

Erin Quinn (Saoirse-Monica Jackson)

In many ways it’s like writing a novel. And the writer is so important in theatre. Obviously it then moves into a rehearsal space and it becomes collaborative but it’s not like TV where from the very first day, there are other people involved.

I’m not saying that’s a bad thing but it’s just nice to have that time on your own. Also in theatre, the stakes are normally much lower – there’s not as much money unless you’re opening shows on Broadway – so it’s a safe place to play. With television, there’s loads of money involved so there are loads of people having opinions [from the outset].

What advice would you give to writers who have an idea for a show?

I would always just say write the script. Don’t go in with an idea or treatment, have a really, really good script – one that you would be happy having filmed right now. If it’s good, people will respond to it … a good script is worth a thousand concepts and people still get excited by a good script in our industry.

The February/March issue of CR – a special issue all about humour – is out on February 22. You can watch Derry Girls on All4 here.

The post Writing Derry Girls: Lisa McGee on making a hit Channel 4 sitcom appeared first on Creative Review.

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Technical Perspective: How Accurate Should Your Mechanical Watch Actually Be?

Charlie chaplin clockmaker.jpg?ixlib=rails 1.1

One of the most interesting things about covering one subject for years and years and years (aside from wondering increasingly if writing about wristwatches all day really counts as a suitable job for a responsible adult) is that you start to notice how many gaps there still are in your own knowledge and how little you’ve actually fact-checked things you’ve repeated as conventional wisdom for all those years. Not long ago, I got to talking with someone who in the line of duty hears, much more often than I do, from customers who sometimes feel their expectations for accuracy from their watches are not being met; this person asked me what I thought a reasonable expectation was.

There is not, I think, a single answer to this question; it really does depend on the watch and it also depends on the individual owner. In many cases, whether your expectations are grounded in reality can simply be checked against the manufacturer’s stated spec for the watch in question. Rolex, Grand Seiko, and many other brands routinely publicize their accuracy and precision requirements; if you buy a Rolex today, you should expect it to be accurate to +2/-2 seconds per day, at most, full stop. Grand Seiko Hi-Beat movements are spec’d to +5/-3 seconds per day, and that’s what you should expect. 

Tenniel white rabbit Alice in Wonderland

In both cases you may get better performance; it’s been my experience anecdotally that Grand Seiko routinely underreports the accuracy of their watches but I certainly don’t have a statistically significant sample. A friend who bought a Grand Seiko GMT, non-high beat, a month ago says he hasn’t noticed it being even a minute off; a minute per month maximum gain or loss was once advertised as a major achievement in the 1960s by Girard-Perregaux, for their Chronometer HF (high frequency) watches. A watch with a chronometer certification from the COSC should keep time to COSC specs, obviously; the COSC spec is among other things, +6/-4 seconds per day.

Beyond manufacturers who publish their internal accuracy specs, and those who have their watches chronometer certified, things can get a bit harder to pin down. However, you can get an idea from the specs published by ETA or Sellita for their different grades of movements. Sellita, for instance, for its SW 200-1, has four grades: standard, special (elaboré), premium (top) and chronometer. In the standard grade which is adjusted to two positions, a maximum deviation in rate between positions of 30 sec/day is in spec, with a daily accuracy of  ±12 seconds per day. In the top grade the expected maximum variation in rate between positions is 15 seconds per day and the accuracy is ±4 seconds per day (the movement is adjusted to five positions). And of course for both Sellita and ETA, the chronometer grade movements have to fit the criteria given by the COSC.

There are some construction differences between grades, mostly in the escapement and in the antishock system. One essential difference between more and less precise watches is in the balance spring; these are also made in different grades and to produce them in quantity, to the degree of precision necessary for a chronometer grade watch, with any consistency, is something only a few manufacturers can do (the biggest by far being Nivarox-FAR, which is owned by Swatch Group).

Movements being assembled at Audemars Piguet in Le Brassus.

I asked one of New York’s most respected watchmakers, Alkis Kotsopoulos, of Swiss Watch Repair Co., whether there is anything to the idea that a new watch needs to settle down on its rate for a few weeks before you can evaluate its accuracy. I mentioned this is something I’ve heard again and again, and said again and again but I didn’t really know if it was true and he laughed. "I’ve said it a lot also," he said, "but I don’t think it’s really true." He went on to say that if he has a customer who really wants the best possible accuracy, he asks about wearing habits, including on which watch the client wears the wrist, how it’s stored at night, activity level, and so on.

vibrating a balance spring by hand at Minerva Montblanc

Vibrating a balance spring by hand at Montblanc Minerva; the watchmaker is using a reference balance to determine the correct active length of the balance spring in the clamp.

The takeaway for me from all this is that with a modern movement, made with modern materials and methods, you can get chronometer (in the COSC sense) accuracy or better but it may involve going to a watchmaker and having the watch adjusted and regulated, especially with a view to evaluating your wearing habits. Out of the box, chances are you will get whatever the movement spec and/or manufacturer spec is for that watch, so if you are concerned about accuracy and precision, it makes sense to do your homework.

Remember, consistent performance in mass produced movements doesn’t require just precision manufacturing, it requires best practices quality control, which is part of what you pay for when you get a precision watch. And of course, for a vintage watch with an unknown service history, there simply are no realistic expectations of precision until you get the watch serviced. You might get lucky but you might not, and I’ve always felt that running a watch on a daily basis on dry lubricants is probably not such a hot idea.

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Suspended Ocean Wave Installations by Miguel Rothschild

Elegy, 2017. Print on fabric, fishing line, lead balls, epoxy, acrylic, 300 x 550 x 280 cm

Multidisciplinary artist Miguel Rothschild works across a wide variety of mediums from modified photography to glass sculpture and textiles. In several recent works the Argentine artist has captured the slow roll of ocean waves in suspended fabric installations titled Elegy and De Profundis. Both artworks seem to play with the viewer’s perception, appearing both as waves or perhaps a slice of the sky. Even the filament that holds the artwork airborne seems to glisten like rays of sun or rain. You can see more of the Berlin-based artists work on his website.

De profundis, 2018. On view at St. Matthäus-Kirche, Berlin.

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Creative: The Power of Peace

I’m a long way from finding peace. Make no bones about it. But things are changing, sliding slowly downhill, transmission in 4-low, wheels glazed over but spinning, digging. The front is starting to come around. Maybe. Finding peace has come as I look for a new path in life. What new path? I don’t know. Haven’t found it yet. I just know I need to start looking. A few months ago I decided to change my attitude, or at least attempt to do so. It started with my wife. I figured if I started there, with her, I’d be able to monitor progress. Yes, of course this started with a fight, but ultimately the fight was what got me to understand I needed to change. So here I am.

There is such tremendous power in peace. What comes with peace is tranquility, stability and grace. Perhaps not all at the same time, or even in any great depth, but they and there and you can feel it. Before I go any further I just want to say I’m not waxing poetic here, nor am I trying to get you to think in any way or do anything or convert to anything, or even begin to think that I have ANYTHING figured out. Nothing I despise more than some photographer in lotus on a beach in Bali telling me how to connect with the world while simultaneously selling me pants, shirts, hats, potions, electronics and their favorite frequent flier program. F^%$ them. See, told ya I hadn’t found peace yet.

I saw an interview with Jim Carey the other day and they asked him why he was at the event he was at and he said “Well, none of this is real and I wanted to come to the one place that had the least amount of meaning.” To some degree I think much of what we have made of life fits into this same category. I think it’s human nature to get distracted. And we have. As have I.

Wait, in a little less than a year I’ll be fifty. That’s it. Midlife crisis. Whew, okay now I know what’s happening.

My wife and I don’t have kids. It was never even on the table. When I met her she asked me and I asked her and we both said “Nope,” and that was it. I’ve never been sure as to why I was so certain I never wanted kids but I knew I would never have them. I love kids. I like to get them in trouble, scare them and generally create mayhem with them but then I let them go back home and I do the same. I’m an uncle four times over. But the more I think about it the more I think I was never meant to have them. I was meant for something else. What else? No idea. If you figure it out let me know.

There has to be more right? Human existence is a puzzling thing. But at the core is a place, an energy, and I believe that place is within me, within primarily my mind but damn the gate is padlocked and security is tight. I’m gonna have to get creative. And that’s what I’m trying to do.

Stay tuned.

Source: http://shifter.media

ChargeDock: a Magnetic Universal Phone Dock for iPhone




Submitted by Avi Cohen, ChargeDock offers a magnetic docking solution for iPhone. It’s a stylish product to charge and hold your phone while looking good standing on the desk. ChargeDock design was commissioned by iBolt.co from Vertex.

ChargeDock: a Magnetic Universal Phone Dock by Avi Cohen

ChargeDock: a Magnetic Universal Phone Dock by Avi Cohen

ChargeDock by Avi Cohen features holding mechanism that consists of a set of powerful magnets embedded in the dock, it’ll securely hold a metal plate that is inserted into the phone case.

ChargeDock: a Magnetic Universal Phone Dock by Avi Cohen

ChargeDock: a Magnetic Universal Phone Dock by Avi Cohen

ChargeDock: a Magnetic Universal Phone Dock by Avi Cohen

Tuvie has received “ChargeDock Magnetic Universal Phone Dock” project from our ‘Submit A Design‘ feature, where we welcome our readers to submit their design/concept for publication.









Source: http://www.tuvie.com

Kid’s closet in the hallway: Perfect for little coats & shoes

I just put together a kid’s closet for my little one, which turned out great.

In our hallway, I had a little spot and needed a place for my son’s coats, shoes and accessories. I could’t find anything that would fit and looked good. So I decided to make one myself.

IKEA items used:

  • EKET cabinet
  • EKET adjustable feet
  • EKET box
  • 3 different SKUGGIS hooks
  • DITTE fabric
  • DRAGAN box

Kid's closet in the hallway: Perfect for little coats & shoes

Other materials:

Hacking a kid’s closet for the hallway

First, I got 2 EKET cabinets, the deep ones to put the EKET box in. The adjustable EKET feet to level it out.

Then I got some some hooks. I choose the SKUGGIS and a DRAGAN box to put in small bits.

Next, I cut the wood panel to the right height and rounded the edges and painted it white.

After that, I searched the internet for a nice wallpaper and came across a “half moon” wallpaper.

Kid's closet in the hallway: Perfect for little coats & shoes

I took it as an inspiration and used some potatoes to stamp the color on the panel.(Use a sponge to soak up some color and press the potato onto it. This way you won’t get to much color on the stamp)

When the paint dried, I mounted the wooden panel onto the EKET cabinets using screws, drilled in from the back.

To keep the two cabinets in front together, I used some double-sided adhesive tape.

I also taped the hooks and box with the double-sided adhesive tape on. (You could use screws too.)

To create the seat I used a thin wooden panel, put some foam on top and wrapped it in DITTE fabric, fixed with tape.

That’s it. And I am really happy with the outcome.

Kid's closet in the hallway: Perfect for little coats & shoes

The part that took the longest was the stamping.

You can personalize this idea with all kind of different products and colors.

~ by Linda

The post Kid’s closet in the hallway: Perfect for little coats & shoes appeared first on IKEA Hackers.

Source: http://ift.tt/2kQWpmA

Kid’s closet in the hallway: Perfect for little coats & shoes

I just put together a kid’s closet for my little one, which turned out great.

In our hallway, I had a little spot and needed a place for my son’s coats, shoes and accessories. I could’t find anything that would fit and looked good. So I decided to make one myself.

IKEA items used:

  • EKET cabinet
  • EKET adjustable feet
  • EKET box
  • 3 different SKUGGIS hooks
  • DITTE fabric
  • DRAGAN box

Kid's closet in the hallway: Perfect for little coats & shoes

Other materials:

Hacking a kid’s closet for the hallway

First, I got 2 EKET cabinets, the deep ones to put the EKET box in. The adjustable EKET feet to level it out.

Then I got some some hooks. I choose the SKUGGIS and a DRAGAN box to put in small bits.

Next, I cut the wood panel to the right height and rounded the edges and painted it white.

After that, I searched the internet for a nice wallpaper and came across a “half moon” wallpaper.

Kid's closet in the hallway: Perfect for little coats & shoes

I took it as an inspiration and used some potatoes to stamp the color on the panel.(Use a sponge to soak up some color and press the potato onto it. This way you won’t get to much color on the stamp)

When the paint dried, I mounted the wooden panel onto the EKET cabinets using screws, drilled in from the back.

To keep the two cabinets in front together, I used some double-sided adhesive tape.

I also taped the hooks and box with the double-sided adhesive tape on. (You could use screws too.)

To create the seat I used a thin wooden panel, put some foam on top and wrapped it in DITTE fabric, fixed with tape.

That’s it. And I am really happy with the outcome.

Kid's closet in the hallway: Perfect for little coats & shoes

The part that took the longest was the stamping.

You can personalize this idea with all kind of different products and colors.

~ by Linda

The post Kid’s closet in the hallway: Perfect for little coats & shoes appeared first on IKEA Hackers.

Source: http://ift.tt/2kQWpmA

3 Scandinavian Homes with Cozy Dining Rooms

There is nothing quite as cozy and inviting as the clean lines and soft textures that are so common in the Scandinavian design style. By using soothing neutral tones alongside natural greenery and bare wood, the Scandinavian homes featured here are exude a calming warmth. Further, the furniture chosen in each is able to convey how important simplicity of style is to the designer. Embellishments and garish accessorizing is better left to other styles — the Scandinavian interior (no matter where its geographic location) is content only with harmony in its color palettes, flow, and overall livability.


Visualizer: Johannes Lindqvist  

The first home featured takes an open floorplan and keeps much of the floor itself open for foot traffic.

The use of indoor house plants in the main living area is anything but minimalist, but it works to create a welcoming gathering spot.

Area rugs, this one with a nice nubby texture, are a great way to separate spaces without closing off a room.

The chevron stripe is a popular feature in the Scandinavian style, and its use here in the wood flooring is a classic, playful choice.

Open shelving necessitates keeping things orderly — this gorgeous white option is from Swedish furniture maker String.

For those people without a green thumb, incorporating plants in wall art is a nice option.

And modern fruit bowls are anotehr way to bring a bit of edible nature into a design.

While the way this throw is slung over the Eames-stlye chair may look careless, it’s actually an effective way of blending textures.

When natural light is allowed in, the contrasting tones take on a more exciting look.

The design in scandinavian kitchens like this one is also typically quite simple.

In the small dining area, Scandinavian style chairs complete a clean and functional look. These particular black chairs are the Thonet style chairs.


Visualizer: Ivaylo Dimitrov  

The colors in the second featured home are not as high-contrast as the first, but the overall effect is still similar.

This design certainly uses a bit more color, as evidenced in the area rug as well as the print of a mural by Jackson Pollock over the sofa. A simple floor lamp makes the sofa a cozy place to read at night, too.

The kitchen looks out onto the main living area, so keeping the colors in the same family (grays are used here) is important.

The Scandinavian style is no stranger to creative accent chairs like this leather butterfly chair.

An architectural art print, this one celebrating Mies van Der Rohe is indicative of the designer’s reverence for style.

Custom city maps, available on Etsy are another stylish way to personalize the walls of any home, Scandinavian in style or otherwise.

The artwork in use in this design ties the space together, with the reds in the wall print mirroring the reds in the living room area rug.

White walls may be drab for some, but in this design they indicate openness and focus the eye on other design elements.

When we get inside the minimalist kitchen, we can see just how simple and sleek it is.

An indoor herb planter is the only spout of life on the clean and clear countertop.

A simple faucet and undermounted sink are practical an unobtrusive.

The dining room is more Scandinavian than minimalist, with gray dining pendant lights and a decorative vase on its large wooden dining table.

A bit of a departure from the design focus of the art around the house is this satire of Giovanni Battista Moroni’s portrait.

Extensive natural lighting in the kitchen and dining area is quite glorious.

In the bedroom, more white on white creates a cocoon that makes it easy wake up each morning.

Even the art in this space tends towards a bit more soothing.

Finally, a neat bedside table lamp, in this case the JWDA Lamp makes it easy to drift off while reading what is surely a design book from the minimalist bedside table.


Visualizer: Kirill Gordeyev  

The final home featured has quite a bit going on in its main living space.

Not only is there a turret in the corner with intricate detailing, but there a few more bold colors and patterns than some Scandinavian designs tend to use.

In the main living are, a swing arm wall lamp acts as lighting for a chocolate-colored velvet sofa.

The rich dark brown works in harmony with the black furnishings like the coffee table and dining chairs to create a modern warmth.

Again, we see the Thonet style chairs used to great effect in the dining space.

Wooden fruit bowls like this one are practical but also stylish.

The lived-in kitchen uses a sleek cutting board as well as a small wooden stool that stand in contrast to its marble countertop.

Another rustic stool decorates one corner of the kitchen.

The dark gray bedroom also has the decorative turret (clearly a heating element) as well as cool gray linens and monochrome art.

The bedroom is not at all fussy, a design choice which can make it a bit easier to relax at night.

The modern wall sconce in the corner is a useful source of light at night.

Finally, a highly modern table makes for the perfect bedside accompaniment to the simple bed design.

Recommended Reading:
50 Inspirational Scandinavian Style Dining Rooms
50 Inspirational Scandinavian Style Living Rooms

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Introducing: The TAG Heuer Carrera Heuer 02

Tagheuer carrera heuer 02 2018 16.jpg?ixlib=rails 1.1

Quick Take

TAG Heuer’s flagship Carrera line, which remains the company’s best-selling collection now comes with the Heuer 02 chronograph movement. Many readers will remember this automatic column-wheel chronograph with vertical clutch from the Heritage Autavia Caliber Heuer 02, the watch that resulted from the Autavia Cup competition. In the lead up to Baselworld, TAG Heuer is announcing a total of 12 – count ’em – new Carreras, most featuring 43mm cases. There is also a 45mm execution with GMT.

Why This Watch Matters

This is the first time we’ve seen the Heuer 02 – a pretty nice automatic column-wheel chronograph movement – powering a Carrera, the flagship watch line from TAG Heuer. (That’s if you exclude the TAG Heuer Carrera 02T, a tourbillon-equipped version of the chronograph that rocked Baselworld 2016 with its sub CHF 15,000 sticker price.) The Heuer 02 caliber is a movement that had a long road to production from the beginning. It first saw life as the Caliber 1969, but was soon rechristened the CH80. This was right around the time that Jean-Claude Biver became CEO of TAG Heuer and paused the project. When it was finally deemed the right time for Heuer 02 to enter production, it debuted in the aforementioned 2017 Autavia Cup winner the TAG Heuer Heritage Autavia Caliber Heuer 02, which was TAG Heuer’s highest profile mechanical watch launch of last year. It’s a great looking, if somewhat large, sports watch with wonderful vintage styling. I spent a week with it a few months ago, and I must say I really loved my time with it. 

Initial Thoughts

While I believe there is a market for this watch, I doubt it’s to be found among the core of HODINKEE’s readers. This is a 43mm or 45mm open-dialed chronograph whose thoroughly modern styling bears more than a glancing likeness to the Hublot Big Bang, with its futuristic, modular construction. Interesting to note that while the TAG Heuer Modular Connected can be disassembled by hand and reconfigured by the owner to have different lugs, say, or a mechanical watch head, this watch is modular in the sense that TAG Heuer can easily create variations in the product line by substituting different materials for lugs, case, etc. The wearer cannot play with it in the same way. When I reached out to Jean-Claude Biver for clarification on this point, he mentioned that the brand will add an online configurator later on, making it easy to personalize your watch.

The Basics

Brand: TAG Heuer
Model: TAG Heuer Carrera Heuer 02
Reference Number: CBG2010.FT6144: black dial and brown leather strap; CBG2011.FC6430: blue dial and blue leather strap; CBG2051.FC6426: pink gold lugs and bezel;CBG2016.FT6161: carbon lugs and bezel; CBG2090.BH0661: full ceramic; CBG2A1Z.BA0658: 45mm version with GMT function

Diameter: 43mm (45mm for GMT)
Case Material: Varies by reference, but includes steel, gold, carbon, and full ceramic options
Dial Color: Blue or black skeleton dial
Indexes: Rhodium-plated, black gold or 5N pink gold-plated hour and minute hands and indexes with white or black Super-LumiNova
Lume: Yes
Water Resistance: 100 meters
Strap/Bracelet: Rubber, brown leather and rubber, steel or matte black ceramic with S-shaped links, blue alligator leather and rubber, or matte black alligator leather and rubber. Folding buckle in steel, PVD-covered steel or Grade 2 titanium with double safety push-buttons and TAG Heuer logo.

The Movement

Caliber: Heuer 02 Automatic Chronograph
Functions: Hours, minutes, seconds, date, chronograph (one version with GMT)
Diameter: 32mm
Power Reserve: 75 hours
Winding: Automatic
Frequency: 4 Hz (28,000 vph)
Chronometer Certified 

Pricing & Availability

Price: To be confirmed
Availability: June 2018

For more click here.

Source: http://ift.tt/1IiKaDm

Introducing: The TAG Heuer Carrera Heuer 02

Tagheuer carrera heuer 02 2018 16.jpg?ixlib=rails 1.1

Quick Take

TAG Heuer’s flagship Carrera line, which remains the company’s best-selling collection now comes with the Heuer 02 chronograph movement. Many readers will remember this automatic column-wheel chronograph with vertical clutch from the Heritage Autavia Caliber Heuer 02, the watch that resulted from the Autavia Cup competition. In the lead up to Baselworld, TAG Heuer is announcing a total of 12 – count ’em – new Carreras, most featuring 43mm cases. There is also a 45mm execution with GMT.

Why This Watch Matters

This is the first time we’ve seen the Heuer 02 – a pretty nice automatic column-wheel chronograph movement – powering a Carrera, the flagship watch line from TAG Heuer. (That’s if you exclude the TAG Heuer Carrera 02T, a tourbillon-equipped version of the chronograph that rocked Baselworld 2016 with its sub CHF 15,000 sticker price.) The Heuer 02 caliber is a movement that had a long road to production from the beginning. It first saw life as the Caliber 1969, but was soon rechristened the CH80. This was right around the time that Jean-Claude Biver became CEO of TAG Heuer and paused the project. When it was finally deemed the right time for Heuer 02 to enter production, it debuted in the aforementioned 2017 Autavia Cup winner the TAG Heuer Heritage Autavia Caliber Heuer 02, which was TAG Heuer’s highest profile mechanical watch launch of last year. It’s a great looking, if somewhat large, sports watch with wonderful vintage styling. I spent a week with it a few months ago, and I must say I really loved my time with it. 

Initial Thoughts

While I believe there is a market for this watch, I doubt it’s to be found among the core of HODINKEE’s readers. This is a 43mm or 45mm open-dialed chronograph whose thoroughly modern styling bears more than a glancing likeness to the Hublot Big Bang, with its futuristic, modular construction. Interesting to note that while the TAG Heuer Modular Connected can be disassembled by hand and reconfigured by the owner to have different lugs, say, or a mechanical watch head, this watch is modular in the sense that TAG Heuer can easily create variations in the product line by substituting different materials for lugs, case, etc. The wearer cannot play with it in the same way. When I reached out to Jean-Claude Biver for clarification on this point, he mentioned that the brand will add an online configurator later on, making it easy to personalize your watch.

The Basics

Brand: TAG Heuer
Model: TAG Heuer Carrera Heuer 02
Reference Number: CBG2010.FT6144: black dial and brown leather strap; CBG2011.FC6430: blue dial and blue leather strap; CBG2051.FC6426: pink gold lugs and bezel;CBG2016.FT6161: carbon lugs and bezel; CBG2090.BH0661: full ceramic; CBG2A1Z.BA0658: 45mm version with GMT function

Diameter: 43mm (45mm for GMT)
Case Material: Varies by reference, but includes steel, gold, carbon, and full ceramic options
Dial Color: Blue or black skeleton dial
Indexes: Rhodium-plated, black gold or 5N pink gold-plated hour and minute hands and indexes with white or black Super-LumiNova
Lume: Yes
Water Resistance: 100 meters
Strap/Bracelet: Rubber, brown leather and rubber, steel or matte black ceramic with S-shaped links, blue alligator leather and rubber, or matte black alligator leather and rubber. Folding buckle in steel, PVD-covered steel or Grade 2 titanium with double safety push-buttons and TAG Heuer logo.

The Movement

Caliber: Heuer 02 Automatic Chronograph
Functions: Hours, minutes, seconds, date, chronograph (one version with GMT)
Diameter: 32mm
Power Reserve: 75 hours
Winding: Automatic
Frequency: 4 Hz (28,000 vph)
Chronometer Certified 

Pricing & Availability

Price: To be confirmed
Availability: June 2018

For more click here.

Source: http://ift.tt/1IiKaDm