The Other Side of Gordon Parks

A new exhibition reconsiders the legendary photographer’s fashion and portrait work.

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Gordon Parks, Cocoon Cape, New York, New York, 1956. © and courtesy the Gordon Parks Foundation

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Gordon Parks, Untitled, 1978. © and courtesy the Gordon Parks Foundation

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Gordon Parks, Ferry Commuters, Staten Island, New York,, 1946. © and courtesy the Gordon Parks Foundation

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Gordon Parks, Untitled, New York, New York, 1957. © and courtesy the Gordon Parks Foundation

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Gordon Parks, Evening Wraps, New York, New York, 1956. © and courtesy the Gordon Parks Foundation

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Gordon Parks, Alberto Giacometti and His Sculptures, Paris, France, 1951. © and courtesy the Gordon Parks Foundation

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Gordon Parks, Untitled, New York, New York, 1956. © and courtesy the Gordon Parks Foundation

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Gordon Parks, Bettina and Frances McLaughlin-Gill, 1950. © and courtesy the Gordon Parks Foundation

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Gordon Parks, Ingrid Bergman at Stromboli, Stromboli, Italy, 1949. © and courtesy the Gordon Parks Foundation

“Even from the beginning, Parks challenged prevailing rules about how to photograph fashion, including objects, group poses and streetscapes that beckoned with the allure of a desired lifestyle or career,” writes the photography historian Deborah Willis of Gordon Parks. A new exhibition at Jack Shainman Gallery, Gordon Parks: I Am You, Part 1, displays Parks’ fashion work from the 1950s and ’60s along with portraits of artists in their studios—Helen Frankenthaler, Alexander Calder, and Alberto Giacometti, to name a few. Parks, who is best known for his velvety black-and-white photographs of the civil rights era, was also an innovative fashion photographer, often taking to New York’s streets for his atmospheric shoots. His artist portraits, however, are quiet and considered, letting the artists disappear into their creations.

Gordon Parks: I Am You, Part 1 is on view at Jack Shainman Gallery, New York through February 10, 2018.

 

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Source: https://aperture.org

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