How do I look?

How do I look?
Deadline: 01 January 2018
Application fee: none

How Do I Look?

Apply: http://ift.tt/2AiRuDb

Grace (GraceGraceGrace.eu) is investigating modes of being/doing/inhabiting middle age! 

If you identify as older and as a woman, join us (7 Feb to 2 March) at Guest Projects (1 Andrews Road E8 4QL, London) as we explore the experience of middle age. We will act as art sleuths, getting to the bottom of how we are perceived and perceive ourselves. 

Three days a week (noon-6pm) there will be workshops, talks, screenings and performance… each week has a theme from make-up to drag to how we dress. We will devise and perform pieces for a final cabaret open to the public. Our work will be documented for a follow-on publication—all participants will be acknowledged/included and receive copies.

We are striving for a diverse group: we encourage people from deaf and disability communities (the space is wheel chair accessible); LGBTQI women; BAME women; regardless of immigration status.

No application fee. 

Applications up to 01 Jan 2018; selected participants notified early in 2018.

 

Source: http://ift.tt/Wgxbkd

Magazine of the year: Victory Journal

Victory Journal is unapologetically big. It towers over the other magazines on the newsstand. Yet with its focus on the “intersection between sports and culture”, it is about much more than sporting prowess, size or strength. Through large-format photography and text, Victory examines sport’s peripheries as much as its participants – and it does so with an impressive, immersive ease.

North American Ring Association decoy as featured on the issue’s cover, photographed by Jared Ryder

While the culture of sport anchors the magazine’s contents, it is hugely varied in scope. Issue 13, for example, includes photo stories on subjects as diverse as Bhutanese archery, US championship checkers and French Ring, a late 19th-century dog sport that came to the US in the 1980s. There are features on men’s gymnastics and women’s ice hockey, a look at Serie B’s Venezia FC, before the issue concludes with some of Ray Wright’s 1970s portraits of English football players in their homes. Sport has long been fertile territory for photographers, as competition and drama naturally make for compelling imagery, but Victory and its contributors avoid cliché.

National Collegiate Athletic Association gymnasts in pre-season training

An early influence on the direction of the magazine came from Founder and Editor Chris Isenberg’s first encounter with Taschen’s supersized Greatest of All Time book on boxing legend Muhammad Ali. “As someone who is obsessed with Ali, it was just exciting that they were making an object that was for people who loved [him], but was elevated and rarefied,” says Isenberg. “It was a very different endeavour than a Time magazine special issue or USA Today supplement. It was comprehensive in terms of his life, it was impeccably curated in terms of the photography and the writing they used, and it treated objects and ephemera with equal importance which felt novel. [I’m] not saying I love every design choice they made in hindsight, or fully endorse the idea of a $3,000 book – but it was a project that wasn’t out to match a standard, it was out to achieve a standard set by its own internal compass. That was and is extremely inspiring.”

Opening spread to Sarah Gearhart’s story on fixed-gear racing, which features images by Nils Ericson

Turning the pages of Victory’s latest issue and the influence of this total approach to covering the world of sport is clear. Creative Director Aaron Amaro also cites a wealth of classic magazines from the 1970s – Interview, Rolling Stone, Avant Garde and Eros – as having helped shaped Victory’s visual direction. There’s something about the boldness of the imagery and the sheer size of the thing as an object that also chimes with this period of time when print was king.

Cover of Victory Journal 12 featuring an image by Antonio Santos

“We always knew we wanted something larger, something that had the gravitas to live on not just as a piece of printed ephemera, but as a historical object,” says Amaro. “When we started Victory it began as a humble 16-page saddle-stitched broadsheet. Later we decided to go perfect bound as the page count increased [and] with that change we lost a bit of image in the gutter…. I think the artistry and design is at the forefront – our contributors really appreciate the large size and the dedication to the most powerful viewing experience,” he continues.

A part of Victory’s appeal as a magazine is the way its contributors document different aspects of sports, an approach that has been followed since the early issues. For Isenberg, this course has been about “really looking around and observing what may not be central to the action, but frames it or ties back into it,” he says. “Great sports writing does that. And great sports photography does it too. We wouldn’t have said at the beginning that we were trying to pursue that necessarily, but the taste for it is an important guide.”

Sport has long been fertile territory for photographers, as competition naturally makes for compelling  imagery, but Victory and its contributors avoid cliché

The design of each edition relies on a distinction between the text (longer essays are usually set over one or more pages) and the images, which tend to run as uninterrupted series, each picture at full-bleed, with brief captions. “This is my preferred way to digest information,” says Amaro of this rationale. “Separate the reading from the viewing. They use different parts of the brain. You read a piece then you take your time with the art. I find it a better way to mentally digest an idea. I kind of hate pull quotes, I think it forces a different hierarchy to the narrative.”

Opening spreads to Kenny Hurtado’s photo series on ‘open-water’ swimming (issue 12)

Online, Victory neatly transfers its approach to narrative and aesthetics to the digital sphere – its underlying values apply across the board, says Isenberg, “whether that’s print, online, film, Instagram, podcast, or event”. Take the film Kite Fight that Victory made in Brazil. “It was something where still photography really just didn’t capture the interest of kite-fighting – and we tried,” Isenberg recalls. “And with the film you can see and hear the place and meet the people, in a very different way to a written story, but the DNA is still Victory. It’s also awesome to collaborate with contributors who work exclusively in moving image, or who cross over between stills and video. And when you have something strong here, it can be seen by hundreds of thousands or millions of people.”

Opening spread to Alejandra Carles-Tolra’s photo story on Brown University’s women’s rugby team from Victory Journal 12

Isenberg adds that since Victory has been working with contributing editor Nathaniel Friedman, he has been pushing the title to be more prolific online. While some online stories will be covered in the magazine as well, he explains, “others are topical in a way that wouldn’t make sense for the book, but still feel animated by the same fundamental guidelines. And it’s very interesting to see Victory engage with the present in that way, it wasn’t something we were all that comfortable doing when we set out, but it’s exciting to see it happen in way that feels true to us.”

Visiting supporters from Calcio Padova S.p.A photographed by Alessandro Simonetti for Peter Macia’s Victory Journal 13 feature on Venezia FC

While the approaches to Victory’s photo stories are in one sense determined by the individual photographers, for Isenberg it’s what Amaro, Photo Editor Shane Lyons and the team then do with the material that brings the range of sports and disciplines into a single, unified volume. “They spend a lot of time getting the individual stories and the overall book right, with everyone chiming in a bit,” he says. “There’s a flow we’re trying to get to which has to do both with the variety and not repeating beats and that kind of looking directly at the action and then looking away from it. It’s become a much gnarlier challenge both to get the right material and to order it as the book’s gotten thicker, but rising to that and getting an issue to where it feels strong in that way is a huge driver for all of us.”


Banner image: Trainer Michael Lorraine and his Malinois dog practice targeting during the North American Ring Association’s Western Regional Trial. The image forms part of Noah Davis’s essay on the sport of French Ring, which features photographs by Jared Ryder. French Ring is a so-called ‘protection’ sport which tests a dog’s ability to protect itself and its handler

Victory Journal is published biannually ($16). Issue 13, Tooth & Nail, is out now

victoryjournal.com, @victoryjournal

The post Magazine of the year: Victory Journal appeared first on Creative Review.

Source: http://ift.tt/1KjyLUn

Tingkat Bento Box: A Set of Unique Lunch Boxes by Studio Steady




Inspired by nostalgic bead maze toys, Studio Steady has designed a unique bento box, Tingkat. It’s a stacking set of re-usable lunch boxes, the design reminds you to a playful mealtime at school or at work. This lunch box set would invoke gestures of play in stacking and fitting sized containers when you often eat variety of good food. Using natural materials, these lunch boxes are crafted using contemporary techniques. This project encourages you to eat home-cooked meal, creating a healthier lifestyle.

Tingkat Bento Box by Studio Steady

Tingkat Bento Box by Studio Steady

Tingkat Bento Box by Studio Steady

Tingkat Bento Box by Studio Steady









Source: http://www.tuvie.com

Magazine of the year: Victory Journal

Victory Journal is unapologetically big. It towers over the other magazines on the newsstand. Yet with its focus on the “intersection between sports and culture”, it is about much more than sporting prowess, size or strength. Through large-format photography and text, Victory examines sport’s peripheries as much as its participants – and it does so with an impressive, immersive ease.

North American Ring Association decoy as featured on the issue’s cover, photographed by Jared Ryder

While the culture of sport anchors the magazine’s contents, it is hugely varied in scope. Issue 13, for example, includes photo stories on subjects as diverse as Bhutanese archery, US championship checkers and French Ring, a late 19th-century dog sport that came to the US in the 1980s. There are features on men’s gymnastics and women’s ice hockey, a look at Serie B’s Venezia FC, before the issue concludes with some of Ray Wright’s 1970s portraits of English football players in their homes. Sport has long been fertile territory for photographers, as competition and drama naturally make for compelling imagery, but Victory and its contributors avoid cliché.

National Collegiate Athletic Association gymnasts in pre-season training

An early influence on the direction of the magazine came from Founder and Editor Chris Isenberg’s first encounter with Taschen’s supersized Greatest of All Time book on boxing legend Muhammad Ali. “As someone who is obsessed with Ali, it was just exciting that they were making an object that was for people who loved [him], but was elevated and rarefied,” says Isenberg. “It was a very different endeavour than a Time magazine special issue or USA Today supplement. It was comprehensive in terms of his life, it was impeccably curated in terms of the photography and the writing they used, and it treated objects and ephemera with equal importance which felt novel. [I’m] not saying I love every design choice they made in hindsight, or fully endorse the idea of a $3,000 book – but it was a project that wasn’t out to match a standard, it was out to achieve a standard set by its own internal compass. That was and is extremely inspiring.”

Opening spread to Sarah Gearhart’s story on fixed-gear racing, which features images by Nils Ericson

Turning the pages of Victory’s latest issue and the influence of this total approach to covering the world of sport is clear. Creative Director Aaron Amaro also cites a wealth of classic magazines from the 1970s – Interview, Rolling Stone, Avant Garde and Eros – as having helped shaped Victory’s visual direction. There’s something about the boldness of the imagery and the sheer size of the thing as an object that also chimes with this period of time when print was king.

Cover of Victory Journal 12 featuring an image by Antonio Santos

“We always knew we wanted something larger, something that had the gravitas to live on not just as a piece of printed ephemera, but as a historical object,” says Amaro. “When we started Victory it began as a humble 16-page saddle-stitched broadsheet. Later we decided to go perfect bound as the page count increased [and] with that change we lost a bit of image in the gutter…. I think the artistry and design is at the forefront – our contributors really appreciate the large size and the dedication to the most powerful viewing experience,” he continues.

A part of Victory’s appeal as a magazine is the way its contributors document different aspects of sports, an approach that has been followed since the early issues. For Isenberg, this course has been about “really looking around and observing what may not be central to the action, but frames it or ties back into it,” he says. “Great sports writing does that. And great sports photography does it too. We wouldn’t have said at the beginning that we were trying to pursue that necessarily, but the taste for it is an important guide.”

Sport has long been fertile territory for photographers, as competition naturally makes for compelling  imagery, but Victory and its contributors avoid cliché

The design of each edition relies on a distinction between the text (longer essays are usually set over one or more pages) and the images, which tend to run as uninterrupted series, each picture at full-bleed, with brief captions. “This is my preferred way to digest information,” says Amaro of this rationale. “Separate the reading from the viewing. They use different parts of the brain. You read a piece then you take your time with the art. I find it a better way to mentally digest an idea. I kind of hate pull quotes, I think it forces a different hierarchy to the narrative.”

Opening spreads to Kenny Hurtado’s photo series on ‘open-water’ swimming (issue 12)

Online, Victory neatly transfers its approach to narrative and aesthetics to the digital sphere – its underlying values apply across the board, says Isenberg, “whether that’s print, online, film, Instagram, podcast, or event”. Take the film Kite Fight that Victory made in Brazil. “It was something where still photography really just didn’t capture the interest of kite-fighting – and we tried,” Isenberg recalls. “And with the film you can see and hear the place and meet the people, in a very different way to a written story, but the DNA is still Victory. It’s also awesome to collaborate with contributors who work exclusively in moving image, or who cross over between stills and video. And when you have something strong here, it can be seen by hundreds of thousands or millions of people.”

Opening spread to Alejandra Carles-Tolra’s photo story on Brown University’s women’s rugby team from Victory Journal 12

Isenberg adds that since Victory has been working with contributing editor Nathaniel Friedman, he has been pushing the title to be more prolific online. While some online stories will be covered in the magazine as well, he explains, “others are topical in a way that wouldn’t make sense for the book, but still feel animated by the same fundamental guidelines. And it’s very interesting to see Victory engage with the present in that way, it wasn’t something we were all that comfortable doing when we set out, but it’s exciting to see it happen in way that feels true to us.”

Visiting supporters from Calcio Padova S.p.A photographed by Alessandro Simonetti for Peter Macia’s Victory Journal 13 feature on Venezia FC

While the approaches to Victory’s photo stories are in one sense determined by the individual photographers, for Isenberg it’s what Amaro, Photo Editor Shane Lyons and the team then do with the material that brings the range of sports and disciplines into a single, unified volume. “They spend a lot of time getting the individual stories and the overall book right, with everyone chiming in a bit,” he says. “There’s a flow we’re trying to get to which has to do both with the variety and not repeating beats and that kind of looking directly at the action and then looking away from it. It’s become a much gnarlier challenge both to get the right material and to order it as the book’s gotten thicker, but rising to that and getting an issue to where it feels strong in that way is a huge driver for all of us.”


Banner image: Trainer Michael Lorraine and his Malinois dog practice targeting during the North American Ring Association’s Western Regional Trial. The image forms part of Noah Davis’s essay on the sport of French Ring, which features photographs by Jared Ryder. French Ring is a so-called ‘protection’ sport which tests a dog’s ability to protect itself and its handler

Victory Journal is published biannually ($16). Issue 13, Tooth & Nail, is out now

victoryjournal.com, @victoryjournal

The post Magazine of the year: Victory Journal appeared first on Creative Review.

Source: http://ift.tt/1KjyLUn

Magazine of the year: Victory Journal

Victory Journal is unapologetically big. It towers over the other magazines on the newsstand. Yet with its focus on the “intersection between sports and culture”, it is about much more than sporting prowess, size or strength. Through large-format photography and text, Victory examines sport’s peripheries as much as its participants – and it does so with an impressive, immersive ease.

North American Ring Association decoy as featured on the issue’s cover, photographed by Jared Ryder

While the culture of sport anchors the magazine’s contents, it is hugely varied in scope. Issue 13, for example, includes photo stories on subjects as diverse as Bhutanese archery, US championship checkers and French Ring, a late 19th-century dog sport that came to the US in the 1980s. There are features on men’s gymnastics and women’s ice hockey, a look at Serie B’s Venezia FC, before the issue concludes with some of Ray Wright’s 1970s portraits of English football players in their homes. Sport has long been fertile territory for photographers, as competition and drama naturally make for compelling imagery, but Victory and its contributors avoid cliché.

National Collegiate Athletic Association gymnasts in pre-season training

An early influence on the direction of the magazine came from Founder and Editor Chris Isenberg’s first encounter with Taschen’s supersized Greatest of All Time book on boxing legend Muhammad Ali. “As someone who is obsessed with Ali, it was just exciting that they were making an object that was for people who loved [him], but was elevated and rarefied,” says Isenberg. “It was a very different endeavour than a Time magazine special issue or USA Today supplement. It was comprehensive in terms of his life, it was impeccably curated in terms of the photography and the writing they used, and it treated objects and ephemera with equal importance which felt novel. [I’m] not saying I love every design choice they made in hindsight, or fully endorse the idea of a $3,000 book – but it was a project that wasn’t out to match a standard, it was out to achieve a standard set by its own internal compass. That was and is extremely inspiring.”

Opening spread to Sarah Gearhart’s story on fixed-gear racing, which features images by Nils Ericson

Turning the pages of Victory’s latest issue and the influence of this total approach to covering the world of sport is clear. Creative Director Aaron Amaro also cites a wealth of classic magazines from the 1970s – Interview, Rolling Stone, Avant Garde and Eros – as having helped shaped Victory’s visual direction. There’s something about the boldness of the imagery and the sheer size of the thing as an object that also chimes with this period of time when print was king.

Cover of Victory Journal 12 featuring an image by Antonio Santos

“We always knew we wanted something larger, something that had the gravitas to live on not just as a piece of printed ephemera, but as a historical object,” says Amaro. “When we started Victory it began as a humble 16-page saddle-stitched broadsheet. Later we decided to go perfect bound as the page count increased [and] with that change we lost a bit of image in the gutter…. I think the artistry and design is at the forefront – our contributors really appreciate the large size and the dedication to the most powerful viewing experience,” he continues.

A part of Victory’s appeal as a magazine is the way its contributors document different aspects of sports, an approach that has been followed since the early issues. For Isenberg, this course has been about “really looking around and observing what may not be central to the action, but frames it or ties back into it,” he says. “Great sports writing does that. And great sports photography does it too. We wouldn’t have said at the beginning that we were trying to pursue that necessarily, but the taste for it is an important guide.”

Sport has long been fertile territory for photographers, as competition naturally makes for compelling  imagery, but Victory and its contributors avoid cliché

The design of each edition relies on a distinction between the text (longer essays are usually set over one or more pages) and the images, which tend to run as uninterrupted series, each picture at full-bleed, with brief captions. “This is my preferred way to digest information,” says Amaro of this rationale. “Separate the reading from the viewing. They use different parts of the brain. You read a piece then you take your time with the art. I find it a better way to mentally digest an idea. I kind of hate pull quotes, I think it forces a different hierarchy to the narrative.”

Opening spreads to Kenny Hurtado’s photo series on ‘open-water’ swimming (issue 12)

Online, Victory neatly transfers its approach to narrative and aesthetics to the digital sphere – its underlying values apply across the board, says Isenberg, “whether that’s print, online, film, Instagram, podcast, or event”. Take the film Kite Fight that Victory made in Brazil. “It was something where still photography really just didn’t capture the interest of kite-fighting – and we tried,” Isenberg recalls. “And with the film you can see and hear the place and meet the people, in a very different way to a written story, but the DNA is still Victory. It’s also awesome to collaborate with contributors who work exclusively in moving image, or who cross over between stills and video. And when you have something strong here, it can be seen by hundreds of thousands or millions of people.”

Opening spread to Alejandra Carles-Tolra’s photo story on Brown University’s women’s rugby team from Victory Journal 12

Isenberg adds that since Victory has been working with contributing editor Nathaniel Friedman, he has been pushing the title to be more prolific online. While some online stories will be covered in the magazine as well, he explains, “others are topical in a way that wouldn’t make sense for the book, but still feel animated by the same fundamental guidelines. And it’s very interesting to see Victory engage with the present in that way, it wasn’t something we were all that comfortable doing when we set out, but it’s exciting to see it happen in way that feels true to us.”

Visiting supporters from Calcio Padova S.p.A photographed by Alessandro Simonetti for Peter Macia’s Victory Journal 13 feature on Venezia FC

While the approaches to Victory’s photo stories are in one sense determined by the individual photographers, for Isenberg it’s what Amaro, Photo Editor Shane Lyons and the team then do with the material that brings the range of sports and disciplines into a single, unified volume. “They spend a lot of time getting the individual stories and the overall book right, with everyone chiming in a bit,” he says. “There’s a flow we’re trying to get to which has to do both with the variety and not repeating beats and that kind of looking directly at the action and then looking away from it. It’s become a much gnarlier challenge both to get the right material and to order it as the book’s gotten thicker, but rising to that and getting an issue to where it feels strong in that way is a huge driver for all of us.”


Banner image: Trainer Michael Lorraine and his Malinois dog practice targeting during the North American Ring Association’s Western Regional Trial. The image forms part of Noah Davis’s essay on the sport of French Ring, which features photographs by Jared Ryder. French Ring is a so-called ‘protection’ sport which tests a dog’s ability to protect itself and its handler

Victory Journal is published biannually ($16). Issue 13, Tooth & Nail, is out now

victoryjournal.com, @victoryjournal

The post Magazine of the year: Victory Journal appeared first on Creative Review.

Source: http://ift.tt/1KjyLUn

Jogging in Millbrook with my Pixel Phone

The Pixel 2 XL

I love this new Pixel phone from Google. I’m thinking about writing a longer form article about what it means for photography going forward… I just need a bit more time to write and think about it!

Daily Photo – Jogging in Millbrook with my Pixel Phone

This is a shot made from two different photos from my Pixel 1 phone. Now I’m actually using the Pixel 2, but I took this a few months ago. One great thing about Google photos (they are not a sponsor or anything), but whenever you take multiple photos and overlap them, the Google server will automatically build a panorama for you. So, after this, I just downloaded the new photo then made some adjustments in Aurora HDR.

Jogging in Millbrook with my Pixel Phone

Photo Information


  • Date Taken2017-03-29 17:45:37
  • CameraPixel
  • Camera MakeGoogle
  • Exposure Time1/1700
  • Aperture2
  • ISO52
  • Focal Length4.7 mm
  • FlashAuto, Did not fire
  • Exposure ProgramProgram AE
  • Exposure Bias

Source: http://ift.tt/2sX4vPC

Poem of the Day: A Winter Daybreak above Vence

The night’s drifts
Pile up below me and behind my back,
Slide down the hill, rise again, and build
Eerie little dunes on the roof of the house.   
In the valley below me,
Miles between me and the town of St.-Jeannet,   
The road lamps glow.
They are so cold, they might as well be dark.   
Trucks and cars
Cough and drone down there between the golden   
Coffins of greenhouses, the startled squawk   
Of a rooster claws heavily across
A grove, and drowns.
The gumming snarl of some grouchy dog sounds,   
And a man bitterly shifts his broken gears.   
True night still hangs on,
Mist cluttered with a racket of its own.
Now on the mountainside,
A little way downhill among turning rocks,
A square takes form in the side of a dim wall.   
I hear a bucket rattle or something, tinny,   
No other stirring behind the dim face
Of the goatherd’s house. I imagine
His goats are still sleeping, dreaming
Of the fresh roses
Beyond the walls of the greenhouse below them   
And of lettuce leaves opening in Tunisia.
I turn, and somehow
Impossibly hovering in the air over everything,
The Mediterranean, nearer to the moon
Than this mountain is,   
Shines. A voice clearly
Tells me to snap out of it. Galway
Mutters out of the house and up the stone stairs
To start the motor. The moon and the stars
Suddenly flicker out, and the whole mountain   
Appears, pale as a shell.
Look, the sea has not fallen and broken   
Our heads. How can I feel so warm   
Here in the dead center of January? I can   
Scarcely believe it, and yet I have to, this is   
The only life I have. I get up from the stone.   
My body mumbles something unseemly
And follows me. Now we are all sitting here strangely   
On top of the sunlight.
James Wright, “A Winter Daybreak Above Vence” from Above the River: The Complete Poems and Selected Prose. Copyright © 1990 by Anne Wright. Used by permission of Farrar, Straus & Giroux, LLC, http://ift.tt/1qc5Is0. All rights reserved.

Source: Above the River: The Complete Poems and Selected Prose(Farrar Straus and Giroux, 1990)

James Wright

Biography
More poems by this author

Source: http://ift.tt/xd0win

Art Quote of the Day

Art Quote of the Day: “A sculptor is a person who is interested in the shape of things, a poet in words, a musician by sounds.” – Henry Moore “A sculptor is a person who is interested in the shape of things, a poet in words, a musician by sounds.” Source: BrainyQuote http://ift.tt/2Az9uNK

What the robots of Star Wars tell us about automation, and the future of human work

BB-8 is an "astromech droid" who first appeared in The Force Awakens. Lucasfilm/IMDB

Millions of fans all over the world are eagerly anticipating this week’s release of Star Wars: The Last Jedi, the eighth in the series. At last we will get some answers to questions that have been vexing us since 2015’s The Force Awakens.

Throughout the franchise, the core characters have been accompanied by a number of much-loved robots, including C-3PO, R2-D2 and more recently, BB-8 and K2-SO. While often fulfilling the role of wise-cracking sidekicks, these and other robots also play an integral role in events.

Interestingly, they can also tell us useful things about automation, such as whether it poses dangers to us and whether robots will ever replace human workers entirely. In these films, we see the good, bad and ugly of robots – and can thus glean clues about what our technological future might look like.


The fear of replacement

One major fear is that robots and automation will replace us, despite work design principles that tell us technology should be used as a tool to assist, rather than replace, humans. In the world of Star Wars, robots (or droids as they are known) mostly assist organic lifeforms, rather than completely replace them.

R2-D2 and C3PO in A New Hope.
Lucasfilms/IMDB

So for instance, C-3PO is a protocol droid who was designed to assist in translation, customs and etiquette. R2-D2 and the franchise’s new darling, BB-8, are both “astromech droids” designed to assist in starship maintenance.

In the most recent movie, Rogue One, an offshoot of the main franchise, we were introduced to K2-SO, a wisecracking advanced autonomous military robot who was caught and reprogrammed to switch allegiance to the rebels. K2-SO mainly acts as a co-pilot, for example when flying a U-Wing with the pilot Cassian Andor to the planet of Eadu.

In most cases then, the Star Wars droids provide assistance – co-piloting ships, helping to fix things, and even serving drinks. In the world of these films, organic lifeforms are still relied upon for most skilled work.

When organic lifeforms are completely replaced, it is generally when the work is highly dangerous. For instance, during the duel between Annakin and Obi Wan on the planet Mustafar in Revenge of the Sith, DLC-13 mining droids can be seen going about their work in the planet’s hostile lava rivers.

Further, droid armies act as the frontline in various battles throughout the films. Perhaps, in the future, we will be OK with losing our jobs if the work in question poses a significant risk to our health.

K2-SO in Rogue One.
Lucasfilm/IMDB

However, there are some exceptions to this trend in the Star Wars universe. In the realm of healthcare, for instance, droids have fully replaced organic lifeforms. In The Empire Strikes Back a medical droid treats Luke Skywalker after his encounter with a Wampa, a yeti-like snow beast on the planet Hoth. The droid also replaces his hand following his battle with Darth Vadar on the planet Bespin.

Likewise, in Revenge of the Sith, a midwife droid is seen delivering the siblings Luke and Leia on Polis Massa.

Droids assist the birth of Luke and Leia Skywalker in Revenge of the Sith.

Perhaps this is one area in which Star Wars has it wrong: here on earth, full automation is a long way off in healthcare. Assistance from robots in healthcare is the more realistic prospect and is in fact, already here. Indeed, robots have been assisting surgeons in operating theatres for some time now.

Automated vehicles

Driverless vehicles are currently flavour of the month – but will we actually use them? In Star Wars, despite the capacity for spacecraft and star ships to be fully automated, organic lifeforms still take the controls. The spaceship Millenium Falcon, for example, is mostly flown by the smuggler Han Solo and his companion Chewbacca.

Most of the Star Wars starship fleet (A-Wings, X-Wings, Y-Wings, Tie Fighters, Star Destroyers, Starfighters and more) ostensibly possess the capacity for fully automated flight, however, they are mostly flown by organic lifeforms. In The Phantom Menace the locals on Tatooine have even taken to building and manually racing their own “pod racers”.

It seems likely that here on earth, humans too will continue to prefer to drive, fly, sail, and ride. Despite the ability to fully automate, most people will still want to be able to take full control.

Flawless, error proof robots?

Utopian visions often depict a future where sophisticated robots will perform highly skilled tasks, all but eradicating the costly errors that humans make. This is unlikely to be true.

A final message from the Star Wars universe is that the droids and advanced technologies are often far from perfect. In our own future, costly human errors may simply be replaced by robot designer errors.

R5-D4, the malfunctioning droid of A New Hope.
Lucasfilms/IMDB

The B1 Battle Droids seen in the first and second Star Wars films lack intelligence and frequently malfunction. C-3PO is notoriously error prone and his probability-based estimates are often wide of the mark.

In the fourth film, A New Hope, R5-D4 (another astromech droid) malfunctions and explodes just as the farmer Owen Lars is about to buy it. Other droids are slow and clunky, such as the GNK Power droid and HURID-327, the groundskeeper at the castle of Maz Kanata in The Force Awakens.

The much feared scenario, whereby robots become so intelligent that they eventually take over, is hard to imagine with this lot.

Perhaps the message from the Star Wars films is that we need to lower our expectations of robot capabilities, in the short term at least. Cars will still crash, mistakes will still be made, regardless of whether humans or robots are doing the work.

The Conversation

Paul Salmon receives funding from the Australian Research Council

Source: http://ift.tt/10p9N0X