New game Hair Nah discusses race and otherness, via hair

If you’re black or mixed race you’ve probably experienced what Momo has; a stranger in the street walking up to you and touching your hair, uninvited, to marvel at how different it feels from their own.

We’ve seen hair come up in pop-culture more and more over the past decade, becoming a strong metaphor for ‘otherness’. In Americanah, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie used hair to address a black woman’s struggle to fit in, to accept her own cultural heritage and to fall in love with herself. Singer Solange celebrated black hair, seeing it as a symbol of empowerment and choice, in her album A Seat At The Table and the #DontTouchMyHair campaign which sparked a lot of discussion on the subject of race and hair on social media. Not to mention recent magazine cover photo retouching rows with Solange (again) and Lupita Nyong’o.

Adding to the discussion of the race debate, via hair, is a new game Hair Nah! It was created over the last 10 months by Momo Pixel, an art director at Wieden + Kennedy. She hadn’t experienced hair touching as much when she was younger, “but for some reason when I moved to Portland it was hair out, hands out. So over time I had this knowledge that people will touch my hair uninvited.” One day, after the frustration of repeatedly having her personal space infringed upon, Momo came up with the idea of the game. “I had to make this. It’s so necessary. I knew that if it was my experience it was other black women’s experiences as well.”

The game can be played at hairnah.com. You can choose a few different hair options for your avatar Aeva and take her out to a different part of the world. Then when people try to touch your hair you can smack their hands out of the way.

“The reactions have mostly been positive,” says Momo. “But there are of course some who disagree. For some people they experience hair touching mostly from other black women, so for them this game doesn’t resonate. Which is cool because everyone’s experiences are different. But for a large portion of women, men, and others, this game is hitting the nail on the head.”

“A lot of people have just said thank you,” she says. Either for expressing a frustration that is their own, or for making them aware of an issue that they didn’t know existed. It’s exactly what Momo wanted: “At least the conversation is being had. Which was the goal.”

The post New game Hair Nah discusses race and otherness, via hair appeared first on Creative Review.

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Design Dilemma: Warming Up the Kitchen Nook

contemporary dining room uncategorized

Kitchen nooks were once a “thing.” That is, it seems that every American bungalow built between the 20s and 60s had one. It was where the family gathered for breakfast and sometimes dinner, and where the kids spread out to do their homework after school. It seems like kitchen nooks have gone by the way side in today’s newer homes, in which they are largely obsolete. In an open concept home in which the kitchen opens directly onto a dining area and family room, there is no longer the need for another separate space in addition to a dining room. Still, plenty of us are living in older homes and we still have our kitchen nooks. And sometimes we want to fix them up.

contemporary kitchen uncategorized

In this kitchen nook makeover, the homeowners have accomplished quite a lot, just with a simple change in wall paint. They swapped out yellow paint for a fresh and cheery patterned geometric print in apple green. The effect is chic and modern, amplified with the addition of a copper pendant lamp. Here’s what the before looked like:

home design uncategorized

And below, more of the after. The addition of framed children’s drawings really helps make this space feel special. The patterned wallpaper also really sets this space off as a very different environment:

contemporary dining room uncategorized

The extra storage already existed, but the homeowners refreshed things a bit with a fresh coat of white paint:

contemporary kitchen uncategorized

This is a post from Home Design Find

Design Dilemma: Warming Up the Kitchen Nook

 uncategorized

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Dune Hybrid Boat Offers Elegancy of Sailing Boat and Efficiency of Powerboat

Dune Hybrid Boat offers luxurious, fantastic boat that is integrated with interior luxury MIRAGE collection and some other pieces that are not yet designed. This boat design follows vision and high demand of ultra luxury water transportation, it features 6 cabins where all in gold finish.

Dune Hybrid Boat by Eugeni Quitllet

Dune Hybrid Boat by Eugeni Quitllet

This concept boat from Eugeni Quitllet is a hybrid between sail boat and powerboat, creating a new category for super tender. Dune boat offers best of both world, the elegancy and the efficiency. This 60m (196 ft.) boat features dune shaped deck in precious wood and sculptural navigation panels.

Dune Hybrid Boat by Eugeni Quitllet

Dune Hybrid Boat by Eugeni Quitllet

More images of Dune Hybrid Boat:
Dune Hybrid Boat by Eugeni QuitlletDune Hybrid Boat by Eugeni QuitlletDune Hybrid Boat by Eugeni QuitlletDune Hybrid Boat by Eugeni QuitlletDune Hybrid Boat by Eugeni QuitlletDune Hybrid Boat by Eugeni Quitllet


Source: http://www.tuvie.com

Volume brings crowdfunding model to art book publishing

The Kickstarter model has worked well for art and design books – the spate of identity manual reissues being a particularly high-profile case in point. Now Thames & Hudson has backed a new start-up that seeks to build on the potential demonstrated by those independent projects to create a crowdfunding publishing platform specifically for illustrated books.

Volume is run by designer Darren Wall and T&H International Editorial Director Lucas Dietrich, who suggested the idea. Though owned by the publisher, the pair are responsible for its day-to-day operations.

Wall had been consulting for T&H and had also crowdfunded books both via his own imprint, Read-Only Memory, and with others, including Mr Bingo’s Hate Mail title and Wallace Henning’s British Rail Manual.

“The books I’d been funding via Kickstarter campaigns were design-led histories on videogames – an area ignored by most big publishers – and indeed it was being turned down by trade publishers that drove me to crowdfund them in the first place,” Wall says. “All this suggested to us that there was a whole world of specialist books that would be supported by a new model – this was the key inspiration and driving force for Volume.”


As with regular Kickstarter campaigns, Volume will run time-limited campaigns from its website – http://vol.co – for each proposed book. And like Kickstarter, varied levels of reward will be available to those pledging support, which will be fulfilled if the funding goal (set by Volume) is met. If the goal is not met, pledges will be refunded.

Applying the lessons of previous successful Kickstarter campaigns, Volume backers will get to see the books come together via regular production updates – “we’ll be sharing page designs, cutting room floor materials, and scenes from the printing floor,” Wall says.

While this is all familiar from the standard crowdfunding playbook, what sets Volume apart is ambition to create a publishing brand in its own right and its relationship with Thames & Hudson. “We enjoy the freedom and pace of a startup, but with the editorial experience and production expertise of T&H there as we require it,” Wall says.

Volume, in other words, is attempting to achieve the best of both worlds – big publisher resources with startup agility and ability to sell direct to backers (something that Unit has also explored, particularly with its use of preordering to mitigate the upfront costs of print).



“Volume can move much more quickly than ‘a traditional’ publisher, direct more resources toward the quality of print and production, and perhaps most importantly, we don’t need to pay as much heed to the demands of the book trade,” Wall says. “Those who pledge for successfully funded projects will receive their books directly from Volume, so we are freed of the trends and limitations of requiring our books to sit happily in a bookshop. A good example: we’re currently working on a book that’s around A2 in size, this would cause bookstores all sorts of headaches to stock and display, but on Volume, we have none of these issues. In addition, we can offer specialist touches with ease – customised editions, one-offs, and signed books. The community aspect of crowdfunding, means we can even respond to our backers’ requests and suggestions, adding rewards or tailoring the book content to match consensus.”

The first Volume volume will be Look & See, a book on Anthony Burrill’s collection of printed ephemera. Backers can choose from an array of extras including postcard sets, a screenprint and signed copies. “We’d been speaking to Anthony for a while about producing a high production book on his amazing collection of printed ephemera and, as Volume became a tangible idea, we suggested to him it might make an ideal debut,” Wall says. “Anthony immediately understood the benefits of creating a book so closely with its eventual readers, and seemed to relish the creative control it would offer. [It’s] a perfect statement of intent for Volume.”

Megastructure – Reyner Banham

Further books planned include collaborations with John Maeda and Takenobu Igarashi and Megastructure, a collection of ‘architectural fictions’.



The post Volume brings crowdfunding model to art book publishing appeared first on Creative Review.

Source: http://ift.tt/1KjyLUn

Volume brings crowdfunding model to art book publishing

The Kickstarter model has worked well for art and design books – the spate of identity manual reissues being a particularly high-profile case in point. Now Thames & Hudson has backed a new start-up that seeks to build on the potential demonstrated by those independent projects to create a crowdfunding publishing platform specifically for illustrated books.

Volume is run by designer Darren Wall and T&H International Editorial Director Lucas Dietrich, who suggested the idea. Though owned by the publisher, the pair are responsible for its day-to-day operations.

Wall had been consulting for T&H and had also crowdfunded books both via his own imprint, Read-Only Memory, and with others, including Mr Bingo’s Hate Mail title and Wallace Henning’s British Rail Manual.

“The books I’d been funding via Kickstarter campaigns were design-led histories on videogames – an area ignored by most big publishers – and indeed it was being turned down by trade publishers that drove me to crowdfund them in the first place,” Wall says. “All this suggested to us that there was a whole world of specialist books that would be supported by a new model – this was the key inspiration and driving force for Volume.”


As with regular Kickstarter campaigns, Volume will run time-limited campaigns from its website – http://vol.co – for each proposed book. And like Kickstarter, varied levels of reward will be available to those pledging support, which will be fulfilled if the funding goal (set by Volume) is met. If the goal is not met, pledges will be refunded.

Applying the lessons of previous successful Kickstarter campaigns, Volume backers will get to see the books come together via regular production updates – “we’ll be sharing page designs, cutting room floor materials, and scenes from the printing floor,” Wall says.

While this is all familiar from the standard crowdfunding playbook, what sets Volume apart is ambition to create a publishing brand in its own right and its relationship with Thames & Hudson. “We enjoy the freedom and pace of a startup, but with the editorial experience and production expertise of T&H there as we require it,” Wall says.

Volume, in other words, is attempting to achieve the best of both worlds – big publisher resources with startup agility and ability to sell direct to backers (something that Unit has also explored, particularly with its use of preordering to mitigate the upfront costs of print).



“Volume can move much more quickly than ‘a traditional’ publisher, direct more resources toward the quality of print and production, and perhaps most importantly, we don’t need to pay as much heed to the demands of the book trade,” Wall says. “Those who pledge for successfully funded projects will receive their books directly from Volume, so we are freed of the trends and limitations of requiring our books to sit happily in a bookshop. A good example: we’re currently working on a book that’s around A2 in size, this would cause bookstores all sorts of headaches to stock and display, but on Volume, we have none of these issues. In addition, we can offer specialist touches with ease – customised editions, one-offs, and signed books. The community aspect of crowdfunding, means we can even respond to our backers’ requests and suggestions, adding rewards or tailoring the book content to match consensus.”

The first Volume volume will be Look & See, a book on Anthony Burrill’s collection of printed ephemera. Backers can choose from an array of extras including postcard sets, a screenprint and signed copies. “We’d been speaking to Anthony for a while about producing a high production book on his amazing collection of printed ephemera and, as Volume became a tangible idea, we suggested to him it might make an ideal debut,” Wall says. “Anthony immediately understood the benefits of creating a book so closely with its eventual readers, and seemed to relish the creative control it would offer. [It’s] a perfect statement of intent for Volume.”

Megastructure – Reyner Banham

Further books planned include collaborations with John Maeda and Takenobu Igarashi and Megastructure, a collection of ‘architectural fictions’.



The post Volume brings crowdfunding model to art book publishing appeared first on Creative Review.

Source: http://ift.tt/1KjyLUn

Sitting at the Lake at Sunset

Interview Around the World

You all may know one of our partners is the Ritz-Carlton. I often do interviews and share photos about their various destinations. Here’s a new article where I talk about 10 different fun destinations!

Daily Photo – Sitting at the Lake at Sunset

I’m not sure there are any bad sunsets in Iceland. I’ve heard it’s “overrrun” with tourists now, but I don’t really think that could be the case. It’s a big country and there are so many isolated spots that you can be alone as you want to be. I suppose there are a few well-known waterfalls and whatnot that may be crowded, but that is not really what Iceland is about to me. It’s more about being alone with nature and light.

Sitting at the Lake at Sunset

Photo Information


  • Date Taken2010-06-13 01:26:33
  • CameraNIKON D3X
  • Camera MakeNikon
  • Exposure Time1/45
  • Aperture8
  • ISO200
  • Focal Length45.0 mm
  • FlashNo Flash
  • Exposure ProgramAperture-priority AE
  • Exposure Bias

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Keep Calm and Steal My Stuff

Where the internet is concerned, people have a “help yourself” attitude. When I first started my site, I will confess that I was ignorant of the nuances of what was, and what wasn’t, off limits. Common sense and my 10th-grade English should have told me all I needed to know, but the internet is HUGE and it is easy to be lazy.

And then something happens, someone slaps your wrist and you are either horrified that you’re “that person” or you think that statistically speaking, you are good to go for awhile before you get caught again. I fell into the first category and used a few pictures that weren’t mine without accurately crediting the original source (a feat which is sometimes incredibly difficult to do) and I quoted others without referencing the original article in a footnote. I don’t do either of these things anymore and haven’t in a really long time. Because of my own transgressions, I am normally pretty chill when someone lifts my work or clips my articles and publishes them on their own site. Instead of calling in an airstrike, I typically shoot off an email and ask the individuals to credit the source with a link back to the original. I don’t like it when people copy entire articles so I might escalate those a bit faster but normally, it’s just an image or a portion of an article and we can all remain friends after the fact.

Occasionally, things get out of hand and there’s almost no recovery possible … I’ll give you an example. A few months ago I was scrolling through the Architizer Facebook page and found an article that piqued my curiosity … 29 Reasons You Should Date an Architect. I wrote a similarly themed posts years ago so I wanted to know if any of my reasons aligned with their reasons.

29 Reasons to Date an Architect on Architizer

Here is a screen grab from the Architizer feed showing the article, you can see that the article is only 10 hours old at this point and has already been shared to over 1,400 times and elicited over 3,600 reactions.  That’s a lot of eyeballs, my friend.

So I clicked the link and I was transported to …

29 Reasons to Date an Architect on Architizer with notes

The actual article. Sandwiched between reasons 24 and 25 (of why you should date an architect) I see one of my sketches from a few years ago and the image source is credited as “The Keep Calm-O-Matic”.

What the hell? So I click on THAT link and I am transported to …

Keep Calm and Steal My Stuff

A commercial website that sells all sorts of stuff … and in this case, that stuff has my sketch on it. So now, this is a different sort of issue. People, someone, is profiting from my work and that is no small issue for me. So I decide to do an image search on Google and type in “keep calm and love architecture” just to see what will happen …

Keep Calm and Love Architecture Image Search

A jillion million images get kicked back to me, but if you’ll notice, the very first image is my sketch!!!

As part of my internet sleuthing, I had searched the for my sketch and asked Google to search for similar images …

Keep Calm and Love Architecture Image Search

Oh my … this image is everywhere.

I went back to the Keep Calm-O-Matic website, the site that is making a little coin off my efforts, to see if there is anything that talks about image rights and ownership. Surprise, there is!

Pretty lame cover-your-butt language, it seems to me that all they are saying is what we should already know. If it isn’t yours, don’t take it (a lesson we all should have learned pre-kindergarten)

Instagram Photo

This was the first time I published this sketch – part of my Instagram feed on September 5, 2013 – and I will confess that I never thought for 1 second that this sketch would get picked up and distributed to thousands of sites around the planet. Part of me thinks that this sort of information movement is pretty cool … things sort of shift for me when the information is used for someone else’s financial gain. I did the work and put it out there for free so why should someone else get to make a buck off of the effort?

There’s really only one way to try and deal with this sort of thing. The Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) which you can read all about on the wiki page (here). Google has a DCMA dashboard that you can access that will allow you to submit the links to websites that have infringed on your material (find it here). The process for submitting the links so that they are removed is pretty straightforward. You submit evidence that the information is yours and then submit the link to the site you are saying took your work without permission. Easy.

Except it isn’t.

Google DCMA response for Life of an Architect

The only problem with this method is that you have to track down all the individual perp’s and submit individual links in each instance. Not that big of a deal when it’s only one site or individual that you are dealing with. In the case of my sketch, it was thousands. So many in fact that I gave up after my second hour of submitting links.

To rub a little salt in the wound, the original source (here) has dealt with the matter and removed the image, but just below is a section titled “Other Designs with this Poster Slogan” and guess what you will find?

Keep Calm ... or not

That’s right … more of the same hijacked sketch. Ugh. I don’t know how to put this genie back into the bottle and I certainly don’t have the time to go through every single instance that I can find online. The crazy thing about this is that I would venture a guess that 99.99% of the people associated with grabbing this image for their own use have no idea the original sketch came from me. They simply saw an image they liked and things moved on from there. Let’s pretend that they tried to do the right thing and did an image search to try and find the original … good luck with that.

I can assure you that I didn’t see this coming when I started this blog in 2010, and as I mentioned, in the beginning, I was guilty of taking a picture that wasn’t mine. It was actually a picture of a chicken (from the post Chicken Coops … Really?and I tried to find the original source material and was unsuccessful – the image I wanted to use was on dozens of sites. After the post was up for a few days, I received a handful of emails from people who all claimed ownership of the chicken picture I boosted. Clearly, they were allllllll the owner of said chicken photo. My solution was to remove the image entirely and to avoid using images from other sites.

Oh well, Keep Calm and Keep On Keepin’ On,

Bob signature FAIA

Source: http://ift.tt/2sRRRBT

Keep Calm and Steal My Stuff

Where the internet is concerned, people have a “help yourself” attitude. When I first started my site, I will confess that I was ignorant of the nuances of what was, and what wasn’t, off limits. Common sense and my 10th-grade English should have told me all I needed to know, but the internet is HUGE and it is easy to be lazy.

And then something happens, someone slaps your wrist and you are either horrified that you’re “that person” or you think that statistically speaking, you are good to go for awhile before you get caught again. I fell into the first category and used a few pictures that weren’t mine without accurately crediting the original source (a feat which is sometimes incredibly difficult to do) and I quoted others without referencing the original article in a footnote. I don’t do either of these things anymore and haven’t in a really long time. Because of my own transgressions, I am normally pretty chill when someone lifts my work or clips my articles and publishes them on their own site. Instead of calling in an airstrike, I typically shoot off an email and ask the individuals to credit the source with a link back to the original. I don’t like it when people copy entire articles so I might escalate those a bit faster but normally, it’s just an image or a portion of an article and we can all remain friends after the fact.

Occasionally, things get out of hand and there’s almost no recovery possible … I’ll give you an example. A few months ago I was scrolling through the Architizer Facebook page and found an article that piqued my curiosity … 29 Reasons You Should Date an Architect. I wrote a similarly themed posts years ago so I wanted to know if any of my reasons aligned with their reasons.

29 Reasons to Date an Architect on Architizer

Here is a screen grab from the Architizer feed showing the article, you can see that the article is only 10 hours old at this point and has already been shared to over 1,400 times and elicited over 3,600 reactions.  That’s a lot of eyeballs, my friend.

So I clicked the link and I was transported to …

29 Reasons to Date an Architect on Architizer with notes

The actual article. Sandwiched between reasons 24 and 25 (of why you should date an architect) I see one of my sketches from a few years ago and the image source is credited as “The Keep Calm-O-Matic”.

What the hell? So I click on THAT link and I am transported to …

Keep Calm and Steal My Stuff

A commercial website that sells all sorts of stuff … and in this case, that stuff has my sketch on it. So now, this is a different sort of issue. People, someone, is profiting from my work and that is no small issue for me. So I decide to do an image search on Google and type in “keep calm and love architecture” just to see what will happen …

Keep Calm and Love Architecture Image Search

A jillion million images get kicked back to me, but if you’ll notice, the very first image is my sketch!!!

As part of my internet sleuthing, I had searched the for my sketch and asked Google to search for similar images …

Keep Calm and Love Architecture Image Search

Oh my … this image is everywhere.

I went back to the Keep Calm-O-Matic website, the site that is making a little coin off my efforts, to see if there is anything that talks about image rights and ownership. Surprise, there is!

Pretty lame cover-your-butt language, it seems to me that all they are saying is what we should already know. If it isn’t yours, don’t take it (a lesson we all should have learned pre-kindergarten)

Instagram Photo

This was the first time I published this sketch – part of my Instagram feed on September 5, 2013 – and I will confess that I never thought for 1 second that this sketch would get picked up and distributed to thousands of sites around the planet. Part of me thinks that this sort of information movement is pretty cool … things sort of shift for me when the information is used for someone else’s financial gain. I did the work and put it out there for free so why should someone else get to make a buck off of the effort?

There’s really only one way to try and deal with this sort of thing. The Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) which you can read all about on the wiki page (here). Google has a DCMA dashboard that you can access that will allow you to submit the links to websites that have infringed on your material (find it here). The process for submitting the links so that they are removed is pretty straightforward. You submit evidence that the information is yours and then submit the link to the site you are saying took your work without permission. Easy.

Except it isn’t.

Google DCMA response for Life of an Architect

The only problem with this method is that you have to track down all the individual perp’s and submit individual links in each instance. Not that big of a deal when it’s only one site or individual that you are dealing with. In the case of my sketch, it was thousands. So many in fact that I gave up after my second hour of submitting links.

To rub a little salt in the wound, the original source (here) has dealt with the matter and removed the image, but just below is a section titled “Other Designs with this Poster Slogan” and guess what you will find?

Keep Calm ... or not

That’s right … more of the same hijacked sketch. Ugh. I don’t know how to put this genie back into the bottle and I certainly don’t have the time to go through every single instance that I can find online. The crazy thing about this is that I would venture a guess that 99.99% of the people associated with grabbing this image for their own use have no idea the original sketch came from me. They simply saw an image they liked and things moved on from there. Let’s pretend that they tried to do the right thing and did an image search to try and find the original … good luck with that.

I can assure you that I didn’t see this coming when I started this blog in 2010, and as I mentioned, in the beginning, I was guilty of taking a picture that wasn’t mine. It was actually a picture of a chicken (from the post Chicken Coops … Really?and I tried to find the original source material and was unsuccessful – the image I wanted to use was on dozens of sites. After the post was up for a few days, I received a handful of emails from people who all claimed ownership of the chicken picture I boosted. Clearly, they were allllllll the owner of said chicken photo. My solution was to remove the image entirely and to avoid using images from other sites.

Oh well, Keep Calm and Keep On Keepin’ On,

Bob signature FAIA

Source: http://ift.tt/2sRRRBT

Art Quote of the Day

Art Quote of the Day: “Great artists suffer for the people.” – Marvin Gaye “Great artists suffer for the people.” Source: BrainyQuote http://ift.tt/2zZdtQg

ethereal skyline

ethereal skyline | ambient/drone | 71:57

With Thanksgiving upon us (USA). . .here’s an ethereal, meandering, tryptophan-laden mix for headphone use after you..[begrudgingly] push away from that last slice of pie @ the holiday table & locate a comfortable, pillow-enabled couch for your post meal nap…Zzzzzzzz
;- )

01 Loscil – Sous Marin
02 Bing Sattelites – Cloud Surfing (excerpt)
03 Emil Klotszch – Tiefe Berge, part 2
04 metlay! – On Little Cat Feet (excerpt)
05 Eyes Cast Down – Exquisite Divination of Patterns
06 Julio Di Benedetto – Still Quiet After
07 Brian Eno & Harold Budd – The Plateaux of Mirror
08 Leonardo Rosado – Upon Contact Reworked
09 Chris Russell – Phlox
10 Dead Beat – Open My Eyes that I May See
11 Mathieu Lamontagne – Pourquoi Faire
12 Bienfay – Mein Entschluss Anders zu Leben
……………………..(My decision to live differently)
13 Aphex Twin – Blur

Download


ethereal skyline

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