Two New Art Prints by Rand Ortiz from THE VACVVM (Onsale Info)

THE VACVVM will release two new art prints by Randy Ortiz tomorrow. “Disingenuous Backpedalling…” is a 9″ x 12″ giclee print, has an edition of 50, and will cost $30. “Everything a Hunter and Everything Hunted” is a 7.75″ x 13″ giclee print, has an edition of 40, and will also cost $30. These go up tomorrow (Friday, December 1st) at 2pm Central Time. Visit THEVACVVM.com.

Randy Ortiz

Randy Ortiz

The post Two New Art Prints by Rand Ortiz from THE VACVVM (Onsale Info) appeared first on OMG Posters!.

Source: http://omgposters.com

Introducing: The IWC Tribute To Pallweber Edition ‘150 Years’ (Live Pics & Pricing)

Img 3583.jpg?ixlib=rails 1.1

One of the most famous early IWC pocket watches from the company’s late 19th century production, is the digital display pocket watch known as the Pallweber. The Pallweber pocket watches are named after the Austrian watchmaker Josef Pallweber, who patented his invention in 1883, and licensed it to IWC. (He licensed the design subsequently to other Swiss producers but the IWC Pallwebers are probably the most widely known). IWC produced Pallweber pocket watches for only a short period of time, starting in 1885. They were very popular at first but after only a few years the market seems to have tired of the novelty, and after 1887 production ceased. Because the period of production was so short, they’re also among the most collectible of early IWC pocket watches. Now, for the very first time, the Pallweber jumping hour and minutes display – revolutionary in its time – is being offered by IWC as a wristwatch.

IWC Pallweber IW505002

The Tribute To Pallweber Edition ‘150 Years.’

The original Pallweber pocket watch used a movement with a distinctive forked cock for the third and fourth wheels – the base was one of IWC’s so-called "Elgin" movements. The name is a bit of a mystery; it apparently has nothing to do whatsoever with the American Elgin watch company but nothing in IWC’s records from the era shed any light on why the name was chosen. 

Pallweber pocket watch, late 18th century.
Pallweber pocket watch movement, IWC

The wristwatch version of the Pallweber which you see here is pretty true to its pocket watch lineage in terms of size; 45mm in diameter, although it’s also relatively thin at 12mm. The movement is, of course, manufactured by IWC; it’s the new IWC caliber 94200, running at 28,800 vph, with a quite good 60 hour power reserve (all the more impressive given the energy drain imposed by the jumping time indications).  The case is red gold, and the dial is white lacquer; production is limited to 250 pieces world wide.

The action of the switchover at the top of the hour is quite entertaining.

The only other three-disk, jumping hours and minutes wristwatch I’m aware of is the Lange & Söhne Zeitwerk, which is a much more complex construction and which includes a remontoire d’égalité to help ensure unvarying torque to the balance. The Zeitwerk is also a smaller watch than the Pallweber, at 41.9mm in diameter (it’s slightly thicker than the Pallweber, however, at 12.6mm). Performance-wise, the biggest difference between the Pallweber and the Zeitwerk is the power reserve: 36 hours for the Zeitwerk vs. 60 hours for the Pallweber. Part of the reason for this is probably that a remonotoire d’égalité requires a certain minimum energy from the balance in order to wind the remontoire spring and the stop-works for the Zeitwerk cuts you off at 36, rather than let you get into that part of the mainspring’s power delivery curve where the remontoire spring is no longer being wound.

There is also a pretty significant price difference between the two: the Zeitwerk is currently $76,200, while the Pallweber reference IW505002 Tribute To Pallweber Edition "150 Years" in red gold, is $36,600. Keep your eyes peeled for more news from IWC’s 150th Anniversary Collection as we get closer to the SIHH, 2018 edition.

Please note that these are prototypes and that final details are subject to minor alteration for actual production pieces.

Source: http://ift.tt/1IiKaDm

Introducing: The IWC Tribute To Pallweber Edition ‘150 Years’ (Live Pics & Pricing)

Img 3583.jpg?ixlib=rails 1.1

One of the most famous early IWC pocket watches from the company’s late 19th century production, is the digital display pocket watch known as the Pallweber. The Pallweber pocket watches are named after the Austrian watchmaker Josef Pallweber, who patented his invention in 1883, and licensed it to IWC. (He licensed the design subsequently to other Swiss producers but the IWC Pallwebers are probably the most widely known). IWC produced Pallweber pocket watches for only a short period of time, starting in 1885. They were very popular at first but after only a few years the market seems to have tired of the novelty, and after 1887 production ceased. Because the period of production was so short, they’re also among the most collectible of early IWC pocket watches. Now, for the very first time, the Pallweber jumping hour and minutes display – revolutionary in its time – is being offered by IWC as a wristwatch.

IWC Pallweber IW505002

The Tribute To Pallweber Edition ‘150 Years.’

The original Pallweber pocket watch used a movement with a distinctive forked cock for the third and fourth wheels – the base was one of IWC’s so-called "Elgin" movements. The name is a bit of a mystery; it apparently has nothing to do whatsoever with the American Elgin watch company but nothing in IWC’s records from the era shed any light on why the name was chosen. 

Pallweber pocket watch, late 18th century.
Pallweber pocket watch movement, IWC

The wristwatch version of the Pallweber which you see here is pretty true to its pocket watch lineage in terms of size; 45mm in diameter, although it’s also relatively thin at 12mm. The movement is, of course, manufactured by IWC; it’s the new IWC caliber 94200, running at 28,800 vph, with a quite good 60 hour power reserve (all the more impressive given the energy drain imposed by the jumping time indications).  The case is red gold, and the dial is white lacquer; production is limited to 250 pieces world wide.

The action of the switchover at the top of the hour is quite entertaining.

The only other three-disk, jumping hours and minutes wristwatch I’m aware of is the Lange & Söhne Zeitwerk, which is a much more complex construction and which includes a remontoire d’égalité to help ensure unvarying torque to the balance. The Zeitwerk is also a smaller watch than the Pallweber, at 41.9mm in diameter (it’s slightly thicker than the Pallweber, however, at 12.6mm). Performance-wise, the biggest difference between the Pallweber and the Zeitwerk is the power reserve: 36 hours for the Zeitwerk vs. 60 hours for the Pallweber. Part of the reason for this is probably that a remonotoire d’égalité requires a certain minimum energy from the balance in order to wind the remontoire spring and the stop-works for the Zeitwerk cuts you off at 36, rather than let you get into that part of the mainspring’s power delivery curve where the remontoire spring is no longer being wound.

There is also a pretty significant price difference between the two: the Zeitwerk is currently $76,200, while the Pallweber reference IW505002 Tribute To Pallweber Edition "150 Years" in red gold, is $36,600. Keep your eyes peeled for more news from IWC’s 150th Anniversary Collection as we get closer to the SIHH, 2018 edition.

Please note that these are prototypes and that final details are subject to minor alteration for actual production pieces.

Source: http://ift.tt/1IiKaDm

Introducing: The IWC 150th Anniversary Jubilee Collection (Live Pics & Pricing)

Iwc.jpg?ixlib=rails 1.1

This is a big year for IWC – the watchmaker is turning 150 years old. To celebrate, we’re getting a pretty expansive collection of watches that range from the very simple to the unbelievable complicated, most based on existing models to some degree or another. The full collection will be unveiled in just a few weeks at SIHH 2018, but for now we’ve got five watches to start with. The most striking of the bunch is the Pallweber, which is based on an archival pocket watch from the nineteenth century – Jack has a full story about that one right here. What I’ve got for you here is a quartet of limited edition models that give a pretty good sense of what’s to come in January and how IWC is celebrating its biggest birthday yet.

Before getting into the individual watches, there are a few general themes and design choices to talk about. First, there are the dials. In its early days, IWC made pocket watches with really stunning enamel dials. Some of these carried through into the wristwatch era, but they’ve basically disappeared into the archive as of late. In tribute to these watches, IWC has fitted the Jubilee pieces with lacquer dials with printed markers meant to emulate the glossy, high-contrast look of the originals. Each receives 12 base coats of lacquer, before being brushed, polished, and then printed with the appropriate markings. They’re available in bright white (with blued hands) or deep blue (with rhodium-plated hands).

The Jubilee watches also all come on the same black alligator straps, meant to give them a dressed-up look. Likewise, each bears a commemorative "150 Years" logo, either as a medallion on the movement (for those with open backs) or a caseback engraving (for those with closed backs). These traits carry through from the most basic models all the way up to the grand complications.

As I said, the full collection won’t be shown until January at the SIHH (don’t worry, we’ll have all the coverage for you live from the show, as always). However, here are four pieces to get you started:

Portugieser Constant-Force Tourbillon Edition ‘150 Years’

Let’s start with the big guy. This watch uses the constant force mechanism that was first developed for the Sidérale Scafuisa, which debuted all the way back in 2011. IWC felt like this was the right time to give the constant force tourbillon new life, and with this watch it’s definitely the centerpiece.

This watch has a massive 46mm platinum case that’s 13.5mm thick and in the classic Portugieser style. The white lacquer dial and blued hands offer tons of contrast, and in addition to the tourbillon at nine o’clock, there’s a moonphase display at one o’clock that is accurate to one day in every 577.5 years. Not bad, right? The tourbillon has an extremely dramatic look, supported by a vertical bridge and enveloped by a metal chapter ring for the seconds display. It is at once industrial in sensibility and refined in execution in a way that is pretty unique in today’s market.

The movement is the new hand-wound caliber 94805, which features an impressive 96-hour power reserve (there’s a power reserve indicator on the dial at 4:30 too). The striped bridges and three-quarter plate construction give the movement a really powerful look, again echoing the appearance of the dial. Set just off-center is the "150 Years" medallion that you’ll find across the Jubilee collection.

The Portugieser Constant-Force Tourbillon Edition ‘150 Years’ is a limited edition of just 15 pieces, priced at $253,000.

Portugieser Perpetual Calendar Tourbillon Editon ‘150 Years’

One could definitely make an argument that this is actually the most complicated watch here. And it’s another serious, serious timekeeper. The Portugieser Perpetual Calendar Tourbillon Editon ‘150 Years’ is exactly what it sounds like: a classic Portugieser case in red gold with a clean white lacquer dial (with the black printing and blued hands) indicating the day, date, month, year, moonphase, and seven-day power reserve, all while displaying a tourbillon at 12 o’clock. Like I said, it’s pretty serious.

This watch runs on the new caliber 51950, the first IWC movement to have both a perpetual calendar and a dial-side tourbillon. As you might expect from the reference number, this movement is based on the earlier caliber 51900, but with the QP added. There is a massive gold winding rotor housing the "150 Years" medallion that you can see through the sapphire back. The movement looks every bit the part of a modern IWC caliber.

The Portugieser Perpetual Calendar Tourbillon Editon ‘150 Years’ in red gold is a limited edition of 50 watches, priced at $110,000.

Da Vinci Automatic Edition ‘150 Years’

iwc jubilee da vinci automatic blue dial

This might be my favorite execution of the Da Vinci yet. The case is the same 40.4mm stainless steel case that you’ve seen on previous Da Vinci Automatic models, but the details on this version are totally different. Most notably, the seconds are displayed in a sub-dial at six o’clock instead of with a central hand, and there is no date window either. That last bit must have more than a few of you excited, no?

iwc jubillee iwc da vinci automatic

From this angle you can see how rich the blue lacquer looks. Sure, I’d almost always take a real enamel dial over lacquer, but on a watch like this I think the lacquer works really well (and keeps the price down a bit too). To me, this Da Vinci balances the design’s more maximalist elements – the scrolling numerals and fancy lugs – with cleaner finishing touches, which gives a more cohesive look and feel.

Powering the watch is the new IWC caliber 82200, which has the company’s signature Pellaton winding system and a 60-hour power reserve. You’ll also notice the ceramic pawls and heart-shaped cam, meant to increase durability over the long run, along with the "150 Years" medallion set into the winding rotor.

The Da Vinci Automatic Edition "150 Years" with a blue lacquer dial is a limited edition of 500 watches and it will be priced at $9,550.

Da Vinci Automatic Moon Phase 36 Edition ‘150 Years’

And, finishing things up, we’ve got this slightly flashy take on the Da Vinci. Sadly we weren’t able to shoot any photos of it ourselves as the prototype wasn’t quite ready, but you can get a good sense from the official press images of what we’re dealing with here. Technically, this watch is identical to the other 36mm Da Vinci models with moonphase (save the lacquer dial and blued hands, of course), but it’s the diamond treatment on the red gold case that really sets it apart. Previous diamond-set models have just featured a diamond-set bezel – this model extends the stones onto the sides of the case and the lugs too. In all, there are 206 diamonds totaling 2.26 carats.

The Da Vinci Automatic Moon Phase 36 Edition ‘150 Years’ is a limited editiion of 500 watches, and is priced at $29,900.

Stay tuned for more on the IWC Jubilee collection over the coming weeks and months. This really just scratches the surface.

Source: http://ift.tt/1IiKaDm

Introducing: The IWC 150th Anniversary Jubilee Collection (Live Pics & Pricing)

Iwc.jpg?ixlib=rails 1.1

This is a big year for IWC – the watchmaker is turning 150 years old. To celebrate, we’re getting a pretty expansive collection of watches that range from the very simple to the unbelievable complicated, most based on existing models to some degree or another. The full collection will be unveiled in just a few weeks at SIHH 2018, but for now we’ve got five watches to start with. The most striking of the bunch is the Pallweber, which is based on an archival pocket watch from the nineteenth century – Jack has a full story about that one right here. What I’ve got for you here is a quartet of limited edition models that give a pretty good sense of what’s to come in January and how IWC is celebrating its biggest birthday yet.

Before getting into the individual watches, there are a few general themes and design choices to talk about. First, there are the dials. In its early days, IWC made pocket watches with really stunning enamel dials. Some of these carried through into the wristwatch era, but they’ve basically disappeared into the archive as of late. In tribute to these watches, IWC has fitted the Jubilee pieces with lacquer dials with printed markers meant to emulate the glossy, high-contrast look of the originals. Each receives 12 base coats of lacquer, before being brushed, polished, and then printed with the appropriate markings. They’re available in bright white (with blued hands) or deep blue (with rhodium-plated hands).

The Jubilee watches also all come on the same black alligator straps, meant to give them a dressed-up look. Likewise, each bears a commemorative "150 Years" logo, either as a medallion on the movement (for those with open backs) or a caseback engraving (for those with closed backs). These traits carry through from the most basic models all the way up to the grand complications.

As I said, the full collection won’t be shown until January at the SIHH (don’t worry, we’ll have all the coverage for you live from the show, as always). However, here are four pieces to get you started:

Portugieser Constant-Force Tourbillon Edition ‘150 Years’

Let’s start with the big guy. This watch uses the constant force mechanism that was first developed for the Sidérale Scafuisa, which debuted all the way back in 2011. IWC felt like this was the right time to give the constant force tourbillon new life, and with this watch it’s definitely the centerpiece.

This watch has a massive 46mm platinum case that’s 13.5mm thick and in the classic Portugieser style. The white lacquer dial and blued hands offer tons of contrast, and in addition to the tourbillon at nine o’clock, there’s a moonphase display at one o’clock that is accurate to one day in every 577.5 years. Not bad, right? The tourbillon has an extremely dramatic look, supported by a vertical bridge and enveloped by a metal chapter ring for the seconds display. It is at once industrial in sensibility and refined in execution in a way that is pretty unique in today’s market.

The movement is the new hand-wound caliber 94805, which features an impressive 96-hour power reserve (there’s a power reserve indicator on the dial at 4:30 too). The striped bridges and three-quarter plate construction give the movement a really powerful look, again echoing the appearance of the dial. Set just off-center is the "150 Years" medallion that you’ll find across the Jubilee collection.

The Portugieser Constant-Force Tourbillon Edition ‘150 Years’ is a limited edition of just 15 pieces, priced at $253,000.

Portugieser Perpetual Calendar Tourbillon Editon ‘150 Years’

One could definitely make an argument that this is actually the most complicated watch here. And it’s another serious, serious timekeeper. The Portugieser Perpetual Calendar Tourbillon Editon ‘150 Years’ is exactly what it sounds like: a classic Portugieser case in red gold with a clean white lacquer dial (with the black printing and blued hands) indicating the day, date, month, year, moonphase, and seven-day power reserve, all while displaying a tourbillon at 12 o’clock. Like I said, it’s pretty serious.

This watch runs on the new caliber 51950, the first IWC movement to have both a perpetual calendar and a dial-side tourbillon. As you might expect from the reference number, this movement is based on the earlier caliber 51900, but with the QP added. There is a massive gold winding rotor housing the "150 Years" medallion that you can see through the sapphire back. The movement looks every bit the part of a modern IWC caliber.

The Portugieser Perpetual Calendar Tourbillon Editon ‘150 Years’ in red gold is a limited edition of 50 watches, priced at $110,000.

Da Vinci Automatic Edition ‘150 Years’

iwc jubilee da vinci automatic blue dial

This might be my favorite execution of the Da Vinci yet. The case is the same 40.4mm stainless steel case that you’ve seen on previous Da Vinci Automatic models, but the details on this version are totally different. Most notably, the seconds are displayed in a sub-dial at six o’clock instead of with a central hand, and there is no date window either. That last bit must have more than a few of you excited, no?

iwc jubillee iwc da vinci automatic

From this angle you can see how rich the blue lacquer looks. Sure, I’d almost always take a real enamel dial over lacquer, but on a watch like this I think the lacquer works really well (and keeps the price down a bit too). To me, this Da Vinci balances the design’s more maximalist elements – the scrolling numerals and fancy lugs – with cleaner finishing touches, which gives a more cohesive look and feel.

Powering the watch is the new IWC caliber 82200, which has the company’s signature Pellaton winding system and a 60-hour power reserve. You’ll also notice the ceramic pawls and heart-shaped cam, meant to increase durability over the long run, along with the "150 Years" medallion set into the winding rotor.

The Da Vinci Automatic Edition "150 Years" with a blue lacquer dial is a limited edition of 500 watches and it will be priced at $9,550.

Da Vinci Automatic Moon Phase 36 Edition ‘150 Years’

And, finishing things up, we’ve got this slightly flashy take on the Da Vinci. Sadly we weren’t able to shoot any photos of it ourselves as the prototype wasn’t quite ready, but you can get a good sense from the official press images of what we’re dealing with here. Technically, this watch is identical to the other 36mm Da Vinci models with moonphase (save the lacquer dial and blued hands, of course), but it’s the diamond treatment on the red gold case that really sets it apart. Previous diamond-set models have just featured a diamond-set bezel – this model extends the stones onto the sides of the case and the lugs too. In all, there are 206 diamonds totaling 2.26 carats.

The Da Vinci Automatic Moon Phase 36 Edition ‘150 Years’ is a limited editiion of 500 watches, and is priced at $29,900.

Stay tuned for more on the IWC Jubilee collection over the coming weeks and months. This really just scratches the surface.

Source: http://ift.tt/1IiKaDm

Introducing: The IWC 150th Anniversary Jubilee Collection (Live Pics & Pricing)

Iwc.jpg?ixlib=rails 1.1

This is a big year for IWC – the watchmaker is turning 150 years old. To celebrate, we’re getting a pretty expansive collection of watches that range from the very simple to the unbelievable complicated, most based on existing models to some degree or another. The full collection will be unveiled in just a few weeks at SIHH 2018, but for now we’ve got five watches to start with. The most striking of the bunch is the Pallweber, which is based on an archival pocket watch from the nineteenth century – Jack has a full story about that one right here. What I’ve got for you here is a quartet of limited edition models that give a pretty good sense of what’s to come in January and how IWC is celebrating its biggest birthday yet.

Before getting into the individual watches, there are a few general themes and design choices to talk about. First, there are the dials. In its early days, IWC made pocket watches with really stunning enamel dials. Some of these carried through into the wristwatch era, but they’ve basically disappeared into the archive as of late. In tribute to these watches, IWC has fitted the Jubilee pieces with lacquer dials with printed markers meant to emulate the glossy, high-contrast look of the originals. Each receives 12 base coats of lacquer, before being brushed, polished, and then printed with the appropriate markings. They’re available in bright white (with blued hands) or deep blue (with rhodium-plated hands).

The Jubilee watches also all come on the same black alligator straps, meant to give them a dressed-up look. Likewise, each bears a commemorative "150 Years" logo, either as a medallion on the movement (for those with open backs) or a caseback engraving (for those with closed backs). These traits carry through from the most basic models all the way up to the grand complications.

As I said, the full collection won’t be shown until January at the SIHH (don’t worry, we’ll have all the coverage for you live from the show, as always). However, here are four pieces to get you started:

Portugieser Constant-Force Tourbillon Edition ‘150 Years’

Let’s start with the big guy. This watch uses the constant force mechanism that was first developed for the Sidérale Scafuisa, which debuted all the way back in 2011. IWC felt like this was the right time to give the constant force tourbillon new life, and with this watch it’s definitely the centerpiece.

This watch has a massive 46mm platinum case that’s 13.5mm thick and in the classic Portugieser style. The white lacquer dial and blued hands offer tons of contrast, and in addition to the tourbillon at nine o’clock, there’s a moonphase display at one o’clock that is accurate to one day in every 577.5 years. Not bad, right? The tourbillon has an extremely dramatic look, supported by a vertical bridge and enveloped by a metal chapter ring for the seconds display. It is at once industrial in sensibility and refined in execution in a way that is pretty unique in today’s market.

The movement is the new hand-wound caliber 94805, which features an impressive 96-hour power reserve (there’s a power reserve indicator on the dial at 4:30 too). The striped bridges and three-quarter plate construction give the movement a really powerful look, again echoing the appearance of the dial. Set just off-center is the "150 Years" medallion that you’ll find across the Jubilee collection.

The Portugieser Constant-Force Tourbillon Edition ‘150 Years’ is a limited edition of just 15 pieces, priced at $253,000.

Portugieser Perpetual Calendar Tourbillon Editon ‘150 Years’

One could definitely make an argument that this is actually the most complicated watch here. And it’s another serious, serious timekeeper. The Portugieser Perpetual Calendar Tourbillon Editon ‘150 Years’ is exactly what it sounds like: a classic Portugieser case in red gold with a clean white lacquer dial (with the black printing and blued hands) indicating the day, date, month, year, moonphase, and seven-day power reserve, all while displaying a tourbillon at 12 o’clock. Like I said, it’s pretty serious.

This watch runs on the new caliber 51950, the first IWC movement to have both a perpetual calendar and a dial-side tourbillon. As you might expect from the reference number, this movement is based on the earlier caliber 51900, but with the QP added. There is a massive gold winding rotor housing the "150 Years" medallion that you can see through the sapphire back. The movement looks every bit the part of a modern IWC caliber.

The Portugieser Perpetual Calendar Tourbillon Editon ‘150 Years’ in red gold is a limited edition of 50 watches, priced at $110,000.

Da Vinci Automatic Edition ‘150 Years’

iwc jubilee da vinci automatic blue dial

This might be my favorite execution of the Da Vinci yet. The case is the same 40.4mm stainless steel case that you’ve seen on previous Da Vinci Automatic models, but the details on this version are totally different. Most notably, the seconds are displayed in a sub-dial at six o’clock instead of with a central hand, and there is no date window either. That last bit must have more than a few of you excited, no?

iwc jubillee iwc da vinci automatic

From this angle you can see how rich the blue lacquer looks. Sure, I’d almost always take a real enamel dial over lacquer, but on a watch like this I think the lacquer works really well (and keeps the price down a bit too). To me, this Da Vinci balances the design’s more maximalist elements – the scrolling numerals and fancy lugs – with cleaner finishing touches, which gives a more cohesive look and feel.

Powering the watch is the new IWC caliber 82200, which has the company’s signature Pellaton winding system and a 60-hour power reserve. You’ll also notice the ceramic pawls and heart-shaped cam, meant to increase durability over the long run, along with the "150 Years" medallion set into the winding rotor.

The Da Vinci Automatic Edition "150 Years" with a blue lacquer dial is a limited edition of 500 watches and it will be priced at $9,550.

Da Vinci Automatic Moon Phase 36 Edition ‘150 Years’

And, finishing things up, we’ve got this slightly flashy take on the Da Vinci. Sadly we weren’t able to shoot any photos of it ourselves as the prototype wasn’t quite ready, but you can get a good sense from the official press images of what we’re dealing with here. Technically, this watch is identical to the other 36mm Da Vinci models with moonphase (save the lacquer dial and blued hands, of course), but it’s the diamond treatment on the red gold case that really sets it apart. Previous diamond-set models have just featured a diamond-set bezel – this model extends the stones onto the sides of the case and the lugs too. In all, there are 206 diamonds totaling 2.26 carats.

The Da Vinci Automatic Moon Phase 36 Edition ‘150 Years’ is a limited editiion of 500 watches, and is priced at $29,900.

Stay tuned for more on the IWC Jubilee collection over the coming weeks and months. This really just scratches the surface.

Source: http://ift.tt/1IiKaDm

Torietsu: Yakitori and Japanese Whisky Come Together in this Tokyo Eatery

I’ve been on a Yakitori kick these days. Sure it’s just chicken, but it’s also so much more! There’s nothing quite like sitting at the counter, watching the chef roast your skewer over hot coals as he fans the flames and smoke rises from the cinders. Omoide Yokocho, which also has the less-appetizing name Piss […]

Source: http://ift.tt/zlrR8Y

Now in Marketplace: Fonts from Process Type Foundry

Minnesota-based Process Type Foundry has a healthy new crop of fonts on our Marketplace — don’t miss it if you’ve been looking for the perfect typeface for a holiday greeting, a logotype, or beyond.

Process Type Foundry is one of our earliest foundry partners and we’re delighted to expand our relationship beyond web hosting to Marketplace — so you can get their fonts in more places!

Moniker Light, Scandia Bold, and Elena Light from Process Type Foundry
Moniker Light, Scandia Bold, and Elena Light from Process Type Foundry

For a neat look inside the foundry, check out our interview with Nicole Dotin about her work back in 2011. Dotin’s Elena has been popular ever since its release, and for good reason — it’s a wonderfully adaptable serif that’s comfortable for long-form reading and plays up its grace at larger sizes. If it seems to suit your needs, don’t miss the package offering, which puts the whole family bundle in a single purchase.

Break Conference website

One of our all-time favorites is Klavika from Eric Olson, shown here on a website we featured in a 2014 Sites We Like. (Sharp-eyed readers will note Elena in there too.) The straight vertical edges make for a strong impression without overwhelming or detracting from legibility, making Klavika a fantastic sans serif for a clean, modern look.

Capucine type specimen
Capucine by Alice Savoie

We’re also excited to include Capucine by Alice Savoie. We’ve added a few of these styles to our regular subscription library, and of course you can find multiple packages for this on Marketplace too. It’s difficult to classify but carries an undeniable energy, and might be just what you need for type that really stands out.

Pique from Process Type Foundry

Finally, for something extra stylish, the single-style typeface Pique by Nicole Dotin is well worth your consideration for something scripty but not at all fussy.

We’ve got a total of 17 families from Process Type Foundry — far more than we can cover in one post! See the whole collection on our Process Type Foundry page.

Fonts on Marketplace are a one-time purchase, and you can then use the fonts like any other you have access to via Creative Cloud: sync it to your desktop and use it in applications, or add it to a kit so you can use it on the web. (And no, you don’t need to keep paying for a subscription — you only need to keep Creative Cloud software running when you’d like to use the fonts you buy.) Learn more about Marketplace.

Source: http://ift.tt/2jd5QiI

YALE Center for British Art Curatorial Scholar Awards

Apply Now – Deadline 15 January 2018

YCBA

Curatorial Scholar Awards are open to curators in museums in the UK. Applications from curators at municipal and regional museums, and those with a demonstrated need for research funding, are especially encouraged. Applicants should be engaged in significant curatorial work in any field of British art. Awards cover the cost of travel to and from New Haven and provide accommodation as well as a living allowance.

http://ift.tt/2zCOktC 

 

Source: http://ift.tt/Wgxbkd

In Kashmir, Hope Blooms

Bharat Sikka offers a poetic portrait of a disputed region.

By Emma Kennedy

Bharat Sikka, Untitled, 2016, from the book Where the flowers still grow
© the artist and courtesy Loose Joints

Bharat Sikka first visited Kashmir as an adult, in 2014, at the age of forty. Raised in India, Sikka is best known for photographs that explore the nation’s recent economic and cultural shifts. Over several trips to Kashmir, Sikka has created a body of work that transports the viewer to its mountains and valleys. Oscillating between intimate portraits of men and sweeping landscapes, Sikka presents a poetic view of this disputed region.

I recently spoke with Sikka, who now lives between India and Europe, and he described his new photobook, Where the flowers still grow (2017), as “an emotional response” to Kashmir. The book acts a recollection of emotions and experiences in Kashmir, allowing readers travel with Sikka on his journey. He focuses in on vivid details: the pink and purple blooms of spring, fresh footprints in the snow, a makeshift wooden fence. Amidst these idyllic scenes are the men of Kashmir, gathering wood, atop their horses, or reclining in a field of yellow flowers. The homes and interiors that appear in these pages are often deserted, as if the men belong to the snowy mountains, not in the cabins patched with sheets of tin. To Sikka, the men are just as much a part of the landscape as the pine trees.

Bharat Sikka, Untitled, 2015, from the book Where the flowers still grow
© the artist and courtesy Loose Joints

Emma Kennedy: What is the meaning behind the title of this series?

Bharat Sikka: Where the flowers still grow—a glimpse of hope in a disturbed area. Kashmir is known as one of the world’s most beautiful mountain valleys, but it has gone through so much turbulence and political conflict that nobody thinks about it in that way anymore.

Bharat Sikka, Untitled, 2016, from the book Where the flowers still grow
© the artist and courtesy Loose Joints

Kennedy: There are no children or women in the images. Why do you focus only on men, often in isolation in the landscape?

Sikka: Almost all my projects—from the beginning, starting with Indian Men (1999–2003)—are about men. I am naturally drawn towards photographing men, especially as subjects. I feel I have more to say about them, although they do make me uncomfortable. In Kashmir, I came across more men than women. It became about the relationship of a man with his space, and I wanted to make the narrative specifically about these men living in their land. In the series, I felt that men played a dominant role, just by their visual presence, especially outdoors, and their constant physical engagement in the political conflict. I had a stronger emotional response to the men. I was perhaps more intimidated by them.

On my first trip to Kashmir, I just photographed men as I found them in the landscape. The style was instinctive based on what I’d shot before: just positioning the person in their environment, and telling a narrative about them through their space—that’s very me. The people are very isolated there, and there are many reasons—some political—why I decided to isolate them in the landscape, which knows nothing of national borders and political rivalries. 

Bharat Sikka, Untitled, 2014–16, from the book Where the flowers still grow
© the artist and courtesy Loose Joints

Kennedy: This series came into being, in part, because of your discovery of Mirza Waheed’s novel The Collaborator (2011). How did the book help you conceptualize the physical and emotional landscapes of Kashmir?

Sikka: I haven’t read the book. During that first trip, my wife read it and told me the story, which is about a young boy and his struggles with his own sense of self in this turbulent region. I didn’t want to interpret the story, but by being in that space and moment, it made a lot of sense. And then I came across this one boy carrying sticks who reminded me of the book’s protagonist, and it started from there. The whole story is about this young boy, another reason why the project has just been about men. The book helped me gain clarity about how to proceed.

Kennedy: The image of the man in yellow with his back to the camera reminds me of the iconic nineteenth-century painting Wanderer above the Sea of Fog by Caspar David Friedrich. Could you talk a little about your influences for this series and your practice in general?

Sikka: I love this reference. I do look at paintings, and was influenced by Edward Hopper quite a lot in my earlier projects. For Where the flowers still grow, a lot of the influence came from my earlier projects. I also wanted to reinvent, and at the same time use my own style, and bring a narrative to the whole project.

Bharat Sikka, Untitled, 2014–16, from the book Where the flowers still grow
© the artist and courtesy Loose Joints

Kennedy: Another of your series, Space in Between (2003–7), also explores the Indian landscape. How do you think about landscape and geography?

Sikka: I am really drawn towards spaces. Even when I take portraits, I place the subjects in their environment, and I often wonder if the picture is more about the space and if the person is just a prop in it. In Space in Between, I was really interested in how India was evolving geographically. In that series and in Matter (2006–ongoing), I explore how India is losing its culture as we become more globalized and homogenized. I think India is confused and now looks dull and grey, especially in the urban areas. It’s not the exotic country that it was years ago. Industrial revolution never took place in India, and nothing was ever planned, or made in a logical way, and now all of this is decaying and cities are overpopulated and polluted.

Kashmir is an extremely beautiful place and has been photographed and documented in many different ways, mostly as pin up calendars with incredible landscapes, sunsets and flowers, or in a very documentary style.

Bharat Sikka, Untitled, 2015, from the book Where the flowers still grow
© the artist and courtesy Loose Joints

Kennedy: The landscapes you capture have a specificity to them, but they also refer to the larger history of landscape photography. For example, your images of valleys and mountain ranges recall those of Carleton Watkins and Ansel Adams, who photographed the grandeur of the American West. If I hadn’t known it was Kashmir, I probably wouldn’t have been able to identify the geographic location. How important is it that the viewer knows where the photographs were taken?

Sikka: I come from a strong Indian background. I spent my first twenty-four years in India, and hadn’t really discovered the world of fine art photography until I went to school at Parsons. I was exposed to all these photographers, even the contemporary ones like Joel Sternfeld and Stephen Shore. Then, when I reflected back on India, I really wanted to show a totally different side of it and how it could be seen in a completely new way. That is also an important part of my work, to move away from my Indian contemporaries and how they’ve explored India. I wanted to move away from all the stereotypical images that are associated with India, especially the ethnic ones.

Bharat Sikka, Untitled, 2016, from the book Where the flowers still grow
© the artist and courtesy Loose Joints

Kennedy: The cover image for Where the flowers still grow is almost completely black. It is such a dark image compared to the others in the series and its presence (or perhaps its “absence” of photographic information) really surprised me. Could you talk a little about this image and how it became the cover?

Sikka: I grew to really like the cover. First, because it was ambiguous and unexpected. Second, the white dot is actually a distant star in a dark sky, and reminds me of a light, like a glimmer of hope, which is similar to the idea behind the title of the book. Third, it reminds me of a conversation I had with my driver Shabir about meteorites—how its pieces fall from the sky, and how people in the past have become rich by finding them, and how he too hoped to find one someday.

Emma Kennedy is arts professional and former editorial work scholar at Aperture magazine. She is based in New York. 

Where the flowers still grow was published by Loose Joints in 2017.

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