Spilling blood in art, a tale of tampons, Trump and taboos

Part of Jordan Eagles’s Blood Equality – Illuminations, 2017, an installation that uses imaged blood on plexiglass.

When Donald Trump said of journalist Megyn Kelly, “you could see there was blood coming out of her eyes. Blood coming out of her wherever”, the American artist Sarah Levy responded by painting a portrait of him using her own menstrual blood.

Setting aside, (as if one could), the overt misogyny implicit in Trump’s comments, his views amplify the anxiety the open body creates – the destabilisation of the intact body of the viewer, a momentary collapse of self.

Artistic freedom is given so as to encourage such exploration. Art operates as a laboratory for ideas, it can be radical, political and sometimes deeply confronting; no more so than when art confronts audiences with bodily fluids most often hidden from view. To paint with menstrual blood is a provocation. It asks that we see things differently, and presents us with what is usually unseen.

But not all blood is equal. When blood is spilled it is generally presumed to be male, frequently in the name of the nation, and spent in some heroic act or another – largely on foreign shores, commemorated but rarely seen. Blood has its place – contained, controlled and out of view.

When blood escapes the body or laboratory, it is particularly disturbing and unruly. We speak of spilt blood as contaminated, infected, impure. Controlled blood-letting is a symbol of masculinity; menstruation a sign of abjection, and gay men’s blood is to be feared, to say nothing of the anxiety of intermingling blood between people, races and species. To work with blood can raise ethical issues, but is equally an opportunity to shed light on the source of many prejudices and misconceptions.


Read more: Explainer: what’s actually in our blood


The feminist art movement of the 1960s and 1970s took aim at these entrenched religious and societal norms, and presented audiences with menstrual blood: both as the subject of art works and the material with which artists worked. Feminist artworks that included blood acquired their potency because of its taboo status. Blood was dangerously out of place.

Before Tracey Emin’s blood soaked tampon appeared in her Turner Prize nominated work My Bed, Judy Chicago produced Menstruation Bathroom as part of Womenshouse (Los Angeles, 1972) an iconic feminist art installation. The bathroom contained a rubbish bin with bloodstained sanitary pads and tampons as “unmistakeable marks of our animality”. Carolee Schneeman’s Blood Work Diary (New York, 1972) consisted of a series of bloodstained tissues blotted with blood from one menstrual cycle, as a response to a male partner’s revulsion at the sight of menstrual blood.

These artists sought to make visible the quotidian blood spilling of which we do not speak, enacting the mantra of the feminist movement of the time: “the personal is political”. As Germaine Greer famously said: “If you think you are emancipated, you might consider the idea of tasting your own menstrual blood – if it makes you sick, you’ve got a long way to go, baby”. As we see from Levy’s portrait of Trump, societies’ taboos continue to imbue art using menstrual blood with threatening power.

A destabilising of self

The ability of the presence of blood and the open body to destabilise one’s sense of self is often utilised by male artists to instil a sense of vulnerability. Franko B’s performance work I Miss You, in the Tate’s Turbine Hall (London, 2003), saw him naked with blood flowing from cuts to his arms and seeping into a canvas covered runway. Largely because of our long standing gendered perceptions of bodies and blood, when male artists bleed, both they and their work tend to be queered, as if “real men” do not bleed.


And so it was that the HIV-AIDS epidemic in western gay communities produced its own form of gendered crisis and diverse cultural and artistic expressions. The blood borne virus also fundamentally changed the way blood was viewed. If women’s menstrual blood was considered taboo, gay men’s blood was considered lethal.

Suddenly the metaphors of blood, pure and impure, clean and unclean, became frightening literal. The spectre of HIV-positive blood pervaded political and social conversations, and the mere sight of blood in association with the gay community set off hysterical reactions.


Read more: Restricting gay men from donating blood is discriminatory


The spectre of blood was ubiquitous during this period, yet ill-informed anxieties around the infection ensured that blood itself was largely absent in art. One exception was Ron Athey’s performance piece, Four Scenes in a Harsh Life, performed at the Walker Art Centre (Minneapolis USA 1994).

Completely fictionalised accounts of the event circulated, with one report describing HIV-positive blood being thrown at the audience. Athey is HIV+, and blood did flow, but it was that of his HIV negative collaborator, Darryl Carlton—aka Divinity Fudge. The erroneous media reactions fuelled the psychic transmission of the virus, if not literally infecting others, at the very least, creating a fear that bodies might silently and secretly be contaminated by mere proximity.

Such fears persist, in spite of scientific knowledge that the virus can only be transmitted intravenously, through sharing needles or blood transfusions, and unprotected sex. It is these phobias that the German artist Basse Stittgen addresses when he creates objects and vessels out of blood products. He challenges audiences to consider whether they would drink out of, or even hold these objects if they were made of blood from HIV or Hepatitis positive donors.

Blood Objects, Basse Stittgen (The Netherlands, Germany) Objects made from animal and human blood, 2017.
Courtesy of the artist

Mixing bodily fluids is also taboo: Andres Serrano’s photographs of semen and blood most notably made this connection between life and death in his Bodily Fluids series in the late 1980s.

After his son Lucas’s birth, meanwhile, artist Mark Quinn created a sculpture out of the mother Georgia Byng’s placenta. The work challenges us to consider where the mother and child separate, where bodies begin and end. Stelarc and Nina Sellers asked similar questions with their work Blender, which mixed both their blood and extracted fat.

But what of interspecies blood mingling? May the Horse Live in Me!, a collaborative project by Marion Laval-Jeantet and Benoît Mangin presents us with this very provocation. Over time, Laval-Jeantet built up an immunity to horse blood, sufficient to enable her to be injected with horse blood plasma as part of an experiment that they describe as a “foray into human/animal ‘blood-sisterhood’.”

May the Horse Live in Me! Art Orienté Objet; Marion Laval-Jeantet & Benoît Mangin (France)
Film and relics of original performance, 2011.

Courtesy of the artists

This work can also be seen as a response to the hubris of the anthropocene, the implicit assumption that humans are something other than animal. Ultimately this seems to be the common thread in these artworks: each asks questions of the ways in which humans are gendered, categorised and deemed separate from animals and from each other.

An exhibition at the Science Gallery at the University of Melbourne, Blood: Attract and Repel, addresses our ambivalent attitudes to blood. Laval-Jeantet and Mangin’s work is represented in it, as is Stittgen’s Blood Objects.

The Hotham Street Ladies (a collective based in Australia, UK and Berlin) present in the show what might be considered as an hysterical homage to Chicago’s Menstruation Bathroom. Vivid icing and confectionary is used to create menstrual murals in two toilet cubicles. There is no real blood this time but perhaps the work is all the more abject through its excess.

You Beaut, Hotham Street Ladies, (Australia, UK and Germany) Installation, 2017.
Courtesy of the artist

Blood is also absent in Irish artist John O’Shea’s Black Market Pudding. He had hoped to produce a sausage using blood drawn from a living pig, but at the time of writing this is apparently a step too far for Australia, with no farmer willing to provide a pig to be bled.

So the work has been produced elsewhere – highlighting how our industrial, legal and ethical frameworks make it easier to slaughter an animal than bleed one, but keep it alive.

Blood: Attract and Repel opens on August 2 and runs until October 5 at the Science Gallery at University of Melbourne.

The Conversation

Kate MacNeill works for the University of Melbourne with which the Science Gallery is affiliated. She has received fundng from the Office of Learning and Teaching.

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Spaceships: Abstract Photographs of European Architecture Portrayed as Spacecraft by Lars Stieger

Berlin-based photographer Lars Stieger travels around Europe to photograph architectural structures, but instead of capturing a building in its entirety he opts to isolate only the most unusual aspects, recasting each as a figment of science fiction. For his new series titled Spaceships he pushes this concept to the extreme by applying an otherwordly color scheme that places these real-life buildings onto alien worlds or sends them hurtling through space. You can see more from the series on Behance.

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Summer

Summer is full of traditions passed down through generations of youth culture. When I think of this season what comes to mind as an adult is the heat and long days working outdoors but I remember back when the summer meant time the woods, cold rivers and streams, camping, road trips, time to explore and enjoy the wistful landscape of time free from obligation.

In that spirit, YoungDoo and I found ourselves with a day off and decided to take advantage by taking Milla out swimming in a lake for the first time and, as I mentioned a post or two ago, I am doing all I can to keep an eye out for those delicate moments hiding in plain sight, ready to capture as a photograph. The image here are from just such a moment, the afternoon light sneaking into the lower level of a boathouse where you pay your dues to get into the lake area. It smelled of moisture, moss, and showers. A familiar cool, damp smell thats hard to forget. A scene that captured a little forgotten corner of my youth that I thought some of you may appreciate as well. Enjoy!

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31/31 July Challenge

It felt weird writing 31/31, and timely, too. As I reflected on this past month, there were so many sentiments I wanted to talk about. My personal growth, which was tremendous. The amount I learned about my craft. The amount of new skills I acquired. The amount of spider webs I walked into, and so on.

What stood out most, though, was the word commitment. I kept coming back to it. Sure, the commitment is obvious: I committed to 31 days of content. A photo, video and blog every day. That’s 93 pieces of content in one month. It is a commitment in every sense of the word. But the word commitment feels hollow if I don’t pair it with community.

I am part of this community, and you are, too. Every day I woke up with a desire to share my life, my unfolding story, with anyone who wanted to listen. Because, at the end of the day, I am not creating solely for myself. I am creating to unleash my imagination, to understand myself more deeply, but also, and equally important to me, is that I am creating for those who feel they cannot. I am creating for those who need to feel connected, who need to feel those two most beautiful words rising in their throat:

Me too.

I don’t take this community lightly. This is my life. This is my craft. This is my soul. I am sharing it because that makes me complete. I am sharing it because if I can do some good in this world, I will try with everything I have. This month took everything I had; every ounce of energy, every bit of patience, and a lot of miles on the road. But it also brought me so much beauty. I was incredibly present. I was connected. And now that the end is come, I desire more. I want to help more people. I want to be a light for someone who is in darkness. And one day, when I am the one in the dark, I know someone from this community will be there to light my way.

Thank you for your support this month. This image is a representation of how I have felt – held up by hands stronger than my own. I owe you.

Today is the last day to sign up for the 15 Day Content Creation Challenge. We begin tomorrow! This is a creativity challenge for any type of artist. You will receive a 52-page e-book, content creation chart, daily challenges and emails, and a supportive Facebook group. And, there is no set cost. You pay only what you can. And 40% goes to charity, so win-win! Registration closes at 5:00pm PST, and emails begin at 5:00am PST on August 1st!

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Auction Report: Jacob & Co. Astronomia Sky Unique Piece Sold At Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation Benefit In St. Tropez (For An Undisclosed Amount)

Astronomia leo.jpg?ixlib=rails 1.1

This is the third year in a row that the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation has held its annual gala in St. Tropez. The highlight of the event is a fundraising auction to benefit the foundation, which was held on July 26. The Foundation exists to raise awareness of the dangers of climate change and to help protect endangered wildlife. The fundraising auction typically features a combination of very high end experiences, access to events, luxury goods and objets d’art. Items up for auction this year included a large assortment of artworks donated for the event. In all, over $30 million was raised.

Presentation of the Astronomia Sky at the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation benefit in St. Tropez.

Presentation of the Astronomia Sky at the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation benefit in St. Tropez.

Vanity Fair reports, "The majority of the sum came from a multi-lot auction that included gifted art works from Richard Prince, Damien Hirst, Jonas Wood, Cecily Brown, and Rudolf Stingel. A large work by Urs Fischer, who was in the crowd, sold for more than $2.5 million. A brief bidding war ensued between Harvey Weinstein and DiCaprio over a large portrait of the actor in paint and crushed-up plates by Julian Schnabel. DiCaprio, who was on stage and teasing the producer to stop putting his hand up, finally banged the gavel on his winning bid of $400,000."

Watches were featured as well. For the past three years, DiCaprio has auctioned one of his own personal Rolexes, but this year Jacob & Co. also donated a unique piece version of the Astronomia Tourbillon for the event.

The Astronomia Sky is a new version of the Astronomia Tourbillon, and it shares the latter’s four-armed carrier system. On one arm is a double tourbillon (including the rotation of the entire carrier, the Astronomia Tourbillon and Astronomia Sky are actually triple-axis tourbillons). On the other three, in the Astronomia Tourbillon, are the hour and minute hands (arranged on a gear system that keeps 12:00 at the top of the display, irrespective of the rotation of the carrier) a rotating globe cut from an orange sapphire; and a rotating running seconds indicator. I went hands-on with the Astronomia Sky earlier this year, and there’s really nothing else like it out there.

Jacob & Co. Astronomia Sky
Astronomia Sky star chart

The Astronomia Sky is also distinct from the original Astronomia Tourbillon in having, as part of the dial, a star chart with a moving ellipse that shows the portion of the sky visible overhead, day or night. The ellipse rotates once per sidereal day, acting as a sidereal time indication as well. For the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation, Jacob & Co. donated a version of the Astronomia Sky inscribed with DiCaprio’s signature, and the words, "Generosity Is The Key To Our Future."  

Leonardo DiCaprio on stage with the Astronomia Sky.

Leonardo DiCaprio on stage with the Astronomia Sky.

The exact figure reached by the watch is confidential, however Jacob & Co. reports it was well over the $580,000 retail price of the standard model. For more info about how the Astronomia Tourbillon came to be, check out our video interview with Jacob Arabo and watchmaker Luca Soprano, who discuss some of the technical challenges involved in creating the watch; and find out more about the environmental initiatives of the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation at leonardodicaprio.org.

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31/31 July Challenge

It felt weird writing 31/31, and timely, too. As I reflected on this past month, there were so many sentiments I wanted to talk about. My personal growth, which was tremendous. The amount I learned about my craft. The amount of new skills I acquired. The amount of spider webs I walked into, and so on.

What stood out most, though, was the word commitment. I kept coming back to it. Sure, the commitment is obvious: I committed to 31 days of content. A photo, video and blog every day. That’s 93 pieces of content in one month. It is a commitment in every sense of the word. But the word commitment feels hollow if I don’t pair it with community.

I am part of this community, and you are, too. Every day I woke up with a desire to share my life, my unfolding story, with anyone who wanted to listen. Because, at the end of the day, I am not creating solely for myself. I am creating to unleash my imagination, to understand myself more deeply, but also, and equally important to me, is that I am creating for those who feel they cannot. I am creating for those who need to feel connected, who need to feel those two most beautiful words rising in their throat:

Me too.

I don’t take this community lightly. This is my life. This is my craft. This is my soul. I am sharing it because that makes me complete. I am sharing it because if I can do some good in this world, I will try with everything I have. This month took everything I had; every ounce of energy, every bit of patience, and a lot of miles on the road. But it also brought me so much beauty. I was incredibly present. I was connected. And now that the end is come, I desire more. I want to help more people. I want to be a light for someone who is in darkness. And one day, when I am the one in the dark, I know someone from this community will be there to light my way.

Thank you for your support this month. This image is a representation of how I have felt – held up by hands stronger than my own. I owe you.

Today is the last day to sign up for the 15 Day Content Creation Challenge. We begin tomorrow! This is a creativity challenge for any type of artist. You will receive a 52-page e-book, content creation chart, daily challenges and emails, and a supportive Facebook group. And, there is no set cost. You pay only what you can. And 40% goes to charity, so win-win! Registration closes at 5:00pm PST, and emails begin at 5:00am PST on August 1st!

Source: http://ift.tt/1nCFv9S

31/31 July Challenge

It felt weird writing 31/31, and timely, too. As I reflected on this past month, there were so many sentiments I wanted to talk about. My personal growth, which was tremendous. The amount I learned about my craft. The amount of new skills I acquired. The amount of spider webs I walked into, and so on.

What stood out most, though, was the word commitment. I kept coming back to it. Sure, the commitment is obvious: I committed to 31 days of content. A photo, video and blog every day. That’s 93 pieces of content in one month. It is a commitment in every sense of the word. But the word commitment feels hollow if I don’t pair it with community.

I am part of this community, and you are, too. Every day I woke up with a desire to share my life, my unfolding story, with anyone who wanted to listen. Because, at the end of the day, I am not creating solely for myself. I am creating to unleash my imagination, to understand myself more deeply, but also, and equally important to me, is that I am creating for those who feel they cannot. I am creating for those who need to feel connected, who need to feel those two most beautiful words rising in their throat:

Me too.

I don’t take this community lightly. This is my life. This is my craft. This is my soul. I am sharing it because that makes me complete. I am sharing it because if I can do some good in this world, I will try with everything I have. This month took everything I had; every ounce of energy, every bit of patience, and a lot of miles on the road. But it also brought me so much beauty. I was incredibly present. I was connected. And now that the end is come, I desire more. I want to help more people. I want to be a light for someone who is in darkness. And one day, when I am the one in the dark, I know someone from this community will be there to light my way.

Thank you for your support this month. This image is a representation of how I have felt – held up by hands stronger than my own. I owe you.

Today is the last day to sign up for the 15 Day Content Creation Challenge. We begin tomorrow! This is a creativity challenge for any type of artist. You will receive a 52-page e-book, content creation chart, daily challenges and emails, and a supportive Facebook group. And, there is no set cost. You pay only what you can. And 40% goes to charity, so win-win! Registration closes at 5:00pm PST, and emails begin at 5:00am PST on August 1st!

Source: http://ift.tt/1nCFv9S

Rain Chains & Musical Drains: Downspout Alternatives Put Drainage on Display [ARTICLE]

Good design is in the details, as they say, and great architectural design details are often site-specific, responding to local contexts and regional conditions. In places like the Pacific Northwest where rain is a defining factor of everyday life, designing for drainage is naturally essential but it also represents an opportunity to get creative. And one way to do that is with a kind of drain pipe alternative called a “rain chain.”

Rain chain in winter, image by contraption (CC BY 2.0)

Rain chains have a long history in Japan and have made their way around the world over time — essentially, they help guide water down off the sides of buildings without the use of pipes. In some places, chains are cheaper or more easily obtained than modern machined downspouts. More sophisticated versions can feature sets of cups linked vertically, turning drainage into a visual and auditory experience while also slowing water down (to help reduce erosion below).

Train chains have become increasingly popular as a reaction against downspouts, which 99pi fan Clifton Stone of Bend, Oregon says “are ugly and are therefore routed inward under eaves to run down an outer wall.” In contrast, “rain chains look great so they head straight down from the eaves, far out from the house.” In short: rather than hide the process (poorly) of draining rain, chains highlight it.

“Perhaps the most difficult part of rain chain ownership, if there is one, is settling on a design,” writes Matt Hickman of MNN. “At their most simple, rain chains consist of a strand of traditional chains or large loops but can also incorporate a touch of whimsy with cups/funnels in the shape of things like watering cans, flowers and umbrellas. And in addition to copper, you can find rain chains made from materials like stainless steel or bamboo.” It all depends on the desired look.

Typical angular house facade interrupted by bent and curved downspouts for drainage

In a way, it’s not really a question of showing or concealing drainage — conventional downspouts are visible as well, even if designed to blend in through material or color choices. Instead, it comes down to a question of what the process is going to look like. Functionally, downspout systems necessitate strange contortions, bending back in from roof-edge gutters to run down the sides of buildings, then jutting back out again to get water away from those same structures. In the end, they can wind up looking more prominent than hidden — for better or worse, they are the architectural equivalent of suit piping.

Dresden Kunsthof Passage by Roland Hauck (CC BY 2.0)

Rain chains are not the only way to mix things up on facades — other clever drainage solutions include an “instrument” (above) on the face of a building in Dresden, which plays “music” when it rains. In rain-heavy places like Seattle, some systems use pipes as planters (below), watering plants with rainwater as it makes its way down buildings.

Drainage planters near Pike Place Market in Seattle, image by Taryn Mazza

Whatever the vertical system, there is also the question of what to do with rain once it reaches the ground. Some rain chains (or downspouts) hook into catchment systems for reclamation purposes. In other cases, water is led to rain gardens, which serve a variety of functions — these can improve water quality by filtering runoff, help with flood control, encourage biodiversity and tie buildings into their environments. A number of cities around the world have programs specifically designed to encourage rain garden development for these reasons.

One of several stylized downspouts on buildings in Anacortes, Washington by Joe Mabel (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Of course, none of these basic systems are new. The Harappan civilization used drains long before the Romans further innovated on plumbing. The Tower of London sported what may have been Britain’s first downspout as early as the 1200s, designed to help keep exterior walls clean. Early American settlers made gutters from sets of boarders connected to form a ‘V’ shape, replaced by cast iron in the 1800s then steel in the early 1900s (followed by plastic and aluminum).

Globalization, meanwhile, has made options like the Japanese rain chain more available around the world. The internet has also made it possible to find unique one-off solutions, like this handrail downspout.

If there is a larger takeaway here perhaps it is about paths of least resistance, with regards to both the actual flow of water and design decisions. On the one hand, it is easy to blindly follow regional precedents and traditions with long histories (or grab whatever is handy at the hardware store). On the other hand, sometimes it makes sense to take a step back and decide consciously how to reveal (or conceal) a natural process. For those seeking more inspiration, here are some more neat drainage ideas. (Special thanks to Doug Mack)

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31/31 July Challenge

It felt weird writing 31/31, and timely, too. As I reflected on this past month, there were so many sentiments I wanted to talk about. My personal growth, which was tremendous. The amount I learned about my craft. The amount of new skills I acquired. The amount of spider webs I walked into, and so on.

What stood out most, though, was the word commitment. I kept coming back to it. Sure, the commitment is obvious: I committed to 31 days of content. A photo, video and blog every day. That’s 93 pieces of content in one month. It is a commitment in every sense of the word. But the word commitment feels hollow if I don’t pair it with community.

I am part of this community, and you are, too. Every day I woke up with a desire to share my life, my unfolding story, with anyone who wanted to listen. Because, at the end of the day, I am not creating solely for myself. I am creating to unleash my imagination, to understand myself more deeply, but also, and equally important to me, is that I am creating for those who feel they cannot. I am creating for those who need to feel connected, who need to feel those two most beautiful words rising in their throat:

Me too.

I don’t take this community lightly. This is my life. This is my craft. This is my soul. I am sharing it because that makes me complete. I am sharing it because if I can do some good in this world, I will try with everything I have. This month took everything I had; every ounce of energy, every bit of patience, and a lot of miles on the road. But it also brought me so much beauty. I was incredibly present. I was connected. And now that the end is come, I desire more. I want to help more people. I want to be a light for someone who is in darkness. And one day, when I am the one in the dark, I know someone from this community will be there to light my way.

Thank you for your support this month. This image is a representation of how I have felt – held up by hands stronger than my own. I owe you.

Today is the last day to sign up for the 15 Day Content Creation Challenge. We begin tomorrow! This is a creativity challenge for any type of artist. You will receive a 52-page e-book, content creation chart, daily challenges and emails, and a supportive Facebook group. And, there is no set cost. You pay only what you can. And 40% goes to charity, so win-win! Registration closes at 5:00pm PST, and emails begin at 5:00am PST on August 1st!

Source: http://ift.tt/1nCFv9S

PPG Infinite’s touch morphing could make it soft synth of the summer

Over the weekend, PPG mastermind Wolfgang Palm let slip his latest creation: PPG Infinite. In previews for iPad, we see an innovative touch synth full of morphing and wave shaping tools.

There are two videos. The first one … uh … well, mainly involves hearing some sounds and staring into the void of space. (True fact: this is what normally happens inside my brain when I look at my to-do list on a Monday.)

But the second video actually reveals plenty – way more than just a teaser. And even from these screenshots, the “Infinite” name suggests that PPG took basically everything they’ve ever done and built a fresh synth around it.

There’s vocal synthesis (à la their Phonem app and plug-in).

There’s wavetable synthesis, with fingers gliding through representation of waveforms, as per the original PPG Wave synths and PPG’s first app, WaveMapper. (Palm is the inventor of wavetable synthesis.)

There’s also the new functions of their follow-up synth WaveGenerator, with more ways of generating and navigating and shaping waves.

And then it seems there’s more.

If you blinked, you may have missed something, so let’s get some frame-by-frame replay. Infinite sees synth wizard Palm teaming up again with designer Cornel Hecht (who also provides the spacey background music for these videos).

Here, we get a unique-looking synth architecture, one that adds loads of touch-accessible morphing modes for combining sounds, as well as something called the “noiser” – which appears to be a spectrally-shaped noise source.

And at its heart, there’s the functionality that made the first PPG app such a breakthrough on the iPad, the ability to “touch the sound” by scanning and morphing wavetables with 3D and 2D views. That visual seems now greatly expanded as a central user paradigm, and it seems to me that it could be reason to see iPads running this app alongside beloved hardware synths in the studio or onstage.

Of course, the other Palm apps have also now been available as VST/AU plug-in, so I hope we’ll see that for this, too. (No reason to choose, either – you might use your iPad to shape presets, then loads those into the plug-in when it comes time to track and arrange and finish tracks. I need to research whether multi-touch computers on Windows can support touch gestures for plug-ins – not sure on that – but even with a mouse, this looks fun.)

Let’s have a look:

Touch is central to the UI. These morphing options look especially nice and accessible, even if you aren’t ready to delve into every nitpicky detail of the architecture and sound design:

A glimpse of the architecture, including simplified oscillator controls and these morphing and noiser options:

The oscillator interface really appears to shine via touch interaction:

A closer look at those controls:

The presets are suggestive of the combination of two or three of the previous instruments from PPG – and indicate some diversity of possibilities with this one, from vocal-ish presets to percussion to pads, bass, leads, and all that business:

For those so inclined, it appears you can get really deep with mapping by key range and matrix-style modulation:

I love the LFO interface, both for its advanced parameters (for going deep) and clever touch adjustment (for quick play):

Stills don’t do it justice, but as in the other PPG apps, it’s really getting your grubby fingers on the 3D waveform view that looks like fun. Combine that with some new vocal synth options, and … sold.

It’s about time for an exciting new soft synth, especially with Alchemy having disappeared into Logic and most of the headlines covering hardware. And for all the depth and diversity on the iPad, this could be one that stands out on that platform – not least if it’s paired with desktop plug-ins so you don’t disrupt your workflow.

Ready, Wolfgang. Watching for this one.

Stay tuned to CDM for this one, with team coverage by myself and Ashley (Palm Sounds).

wolfgangpalm.com

The post PPG Infinite’s touch morphing could make it soft synth of the summer appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

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