Why are there so few women screen composers?

Lisa Gerrard performing in Budapest, 2012. She is one of Australia’s few successful female composers for screen. Balazs Mohai/EPA

Just 13% of those composing music for screen are women, according to membership figures from APRA AMCOS, the organisation that looks after copyright for songwriters, composers and music publishers in Australia.

Female screen composers sit at the intersection of two industries – music and film – that have both been recognised as being male-dominated. To better understand the pathways and barriers for women in this field, and why women in music are underrepresented more generally, APRA AMCOS commissioned research in this area early this year (conducted by myself and Fabian Cannizzo), which has just been released.

Using surveys completed by 159 screen composers and in-depth interviews with 28 of them, our research found there was a gulf between men and women in their understanding of gender issues in the industry. (All participants in the research identified as either male or female). For instance, 67% of women participants agreed with the statement that “gender discrimination is common in the industry”, compared with only 32% of men.

In interviews, women talked about the screen composing industry as being a “boys’ club”. They perceived this as operating in many different ways, from male-dominated networks that proved almost impossible to break into, to studio cultures that were covertly or overtly misogynistic, through to actual sexual harassment.

Men, on the other hand, were more likely to talk about the industry as being a “meritocracy”, where the only factor that mattered was talent. In responses to the survey, some men were openly antagonistic towards the idea that questions should even be asked about gender issues in the first place. At the same time, the men who could see there was a problem often had difficulty articulating exactly what it was or what the effects were.

Men and women agreed that a meritocracy was an ideal goal to work towards, but men’s understanding of women’s experiences – and therefore the ways in which they might be contributing to women’s marginalisation – was limited.

Numerous other factors emerged as barriers to women in screen composing. Many of these have been identified as issues for women in a range of other careers. For example, having children had a much more negative effect on women’s careers than on men’s.

Working as a screen composer is precarious – most work on a project-by-project basis and reported “feast or famine” type schedules with little control over when work needed to be done. Factoring caring responsibilities into this mix limited or ended women’s careers in many cases.

The women who successfully negotiated this life change had often established professional partnerships that meant networks and industry knowledge could be maintained. However, in a highly individualised field, establishing such partnerships is not always possible.

The research also found there was a common perception that men and women composed different types of music. Women’s compositions were seen as more suited to the work of women directors, or to films or TV shows that dealt with “women’s issues”. Given the continued gender imbalance both behind the camera and in the stories that are told on screen, this idea that women can only compose for or about “feminine” topics makes it less likely again that they will be hired.

We also found that far fewer women than men are enrolling in higher education courses related to screen composition. Education institutions we consulted reported around one-tenth to one-third of their students were female. This appears to be related to the wider issue of women’s relationship with technology, as many of the courses related to screen composition were tech-focused.

These and other factors that emerged connect back to essentialist ideas about what men and women can or should do.

So what can be done to counteract these trends?

While we wish to avoid making this discussion “about men”, finding ways to engage men in equity initiatives seems important. With men still in the majority of decision-making roles in the music, film and television industries, making change on a large scale will be difficult to achieve without men recognising and working to combat gender inequality.

Asking men to at least think about how their practices and decision-making processes may be negatively impacting women, and to acknowledge that women’s experiences of the industry may be very different to their own is a simple starting point, but one that needs to go much further.

Other strategies such as finding ways for women to network and develop partnerships that help sustain their careers should be considered. Highlighting the careers of women who have succeeded in this area, such as Lisa Gerrard, Caitlin Yeo Amanda Brown and Bryony Marks and providing mentoring and access to role models, is a starting point here.

It is encouraging to see APRA AMCOS committing to taking actions along these lines, through establishing mentorship programs and masterclasses. It is also working to increase women’s participation across the board, from membership numbers to positions on award panels and beyond.

More research is still needed, especially to widen the focus to create a more intersectional understanding of inequality in music. However practical and measurable changes such as these are important steps in moving towards equality.

The Conversation

Disclosure

Catherine Strong undertook this research for APRA AMCOS.

Source: http://ift.tt/10p9N0X

Why are there so few women screen composers?

Lisa Gerrard performing in Budapest, 2012. She is one of Australia’s few successful female composers for screen. Balazs Mohai/EPA

Just 13% of those composing music for screen are women, according to membership figures from APRA AMCOS, the organisation that looks after copyright for songwriters, composers and music publishers in Australia.

Female screen composers sit at the intersection of two industries – music and film – that have both been recognised as being male-dominated. To better understand the pathways and barriers for women in this field, and why women in music are underrepresented more generally, APRA AMCOS commissioned research in this area early this year (conducted by myself and Fabian Cannizzo), which has just been released.

Using surveys completed by 159 screen composers and in-depth interviews with 28 of them, our research found there was a gulf between men and women in their understanding of gender issues in the industry. (All participants in the research identified as either male or female). For instance, 67% of women participants agreed with the statement that “gender discrimination is common in the industry”, compared with only 32% of men.

In interviews, women talked about the screen composing industry as being a “boys’ club”. They perceived this as operating in many different ways, from male-dominated networks that proved almost impossible to break into, to studio cultures that were covertly or overtly misogynistic, through to actual sexual harassment.

Men, on the other hand, were more likely to talk about the industry as being a “meritocracy”, where the only factor that mattered was talent. In responses to the survey, some men were openly antagonistic towards the idea that questions should even be asked about gender issues in the first place. At the same time, the men who could see there was a problem often had difficulty articulating exactly what it was or what the effects were.

Men and women agreed that a meritocracy was an ideal goal to work towards, but men’s understanding of women’s experiences – and therefore the ways in which they might be contributing to women’s marginalisation – was limited.

Numerous other factors emerged as barriers to women in screen composing. Many of these have been identified as issues for women in a range of other careers. For example, having children had a much more negative effect on women’s careers than on men’s.

Working as a screen composer is precarious – most work on a project-by-project basis and reported “feast or famine” type schedules with little control over when work needed to be done. Factoring caring responsibilities into this mix limited or ended women’s careers in many cases.

The women who successfully negotiated this life change had often established professional partnerships that meant networks and industry knowledge could be maintained. However, in a highly individualised field, establishing such partnerships is not always possible.

The research also found there was a common perception that men and women composed different types of music. Women’s compositions were seen as more suited to the work of women directors, or to films or TV shows that dealt with “women’s issues”. Given the continued gender imbalance both behind the camera and in the stories that are told on screen, this idea that women can only compose for or about “feminine” topics makes it less likely again that they will be hired.

We also found that far fewer women than men are enrolling in higher education courses related to screen composition. Education institutions we consulted reported around one-tenth to one-third of their students were female. This appears to be related to the wider issue of women’s relationship with technology, as many of the courses related to screen composition were tech-focused.

These and other factors that emerged connect back to essentialist ideas about what men and women can or should do.

So what can be done to counteract these trends?

While we wish to avoid making this discussion “about men”, finding ways to engage men in equity initiatives seems important. With men still in the majority of decision-making roles in the music, film and television industries, making change on a large scale will be difficult to achieve without men recognising and working to combat gender inequality.

Asking men to at least think about how their practices and decision-making processes may be negatively impacting women, and to acknowledge that women’s experiences of the industry may be very different to their own is a simple starting point, but one that needs to go much further.

Other strategies such as finding ways for women to network and develop partnerships that help sustain their careers should be considered. Highlighting the careers of women who have succeeded in this area, such as Lisa Gerrard, Caitlin Yeo Amanda Brown and Bryony Marks and providing mentoring and access to role models, is a starting point here.

It is encouraging to see APRA AMCOS committing to taking actions along these lines, through establishing mentorship programs and masterclasses. It is also working to increase women’s participation across the board, from membership numbers to positions on award panels and beyond.

More research is still needed, especially to widen the focus to create a more intersectional understanding of inequality in music. However practical and measurable changes such as these are important steps in moving towards equality.

The Conversation

Disclosure

Catherine Strong undertook this research for APRA AMCOS.

Source: http://ift.tt/10p9N0X

Remix some NOIZ

NOIZ is Studio Amplify’s second app, and it’s just over a year old now. Studio Amplify have updated it pretty continually since launch. This latest update, version 2.4 has added a very useful new feature, remixing. Now you can grab any track from your feed and simply remix it by pressing the button. That’s pretty cool.

Studio Amplify have been putting out great apps since their first, Junglator. NOIZ was a big shift and one that really added to simplifying music creation. KRFT, their latest app, has a very different take on modular music creation. You can certainly say that they do things differently.

 

The post Remix some NOIZ appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Source: http://cdm.link

In the kitchen

Our weekend wasn’t very eventful, unless you consider washing cabinets and drawers some kind of twisted version of excitement. And what do you do when your kitchen is feeling ultra clean and you know that with two kids under 7, it won’t remain like this for long? Take a picture, of course. Then spend the rest of the day trying to maintain its pristine condition in spite of meals and snacks for 4 people.

Also, you might remember this vintage Japanese brass spoon from the souvenirs I brought home from L.A. last month? It’s from Gjusta Goods.

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Flickr Heroes of the Week

Our new Flickr Heroes of the Week are ‘Geometria Organica‘ by Roberto Porcelli on Facebook & Google+ and ‘Beach Sunset #1‘ by Dan Khan on Twitter & Tumblr.

Geometria Organica
Beach Sunset #1

Here are some Flickr Hero Honorable Mentions for this week:

Gerbera Petals
lora
G a b i
Make a wish

If you want your photo to be considered for a Flickr Hero feature next week, submit your best image(s) to the Flickr Heroes group pool by Monday morning! Winners are announced in the Flickr Heroes Group, on the blog, and across our social media accounts!

Source: http://blog.flickr.net

Bright loft with nordic and industrial vibes

Another stylish loft situated inside of an old factory. It has a lovely scandinavian vibe which suits the place very well and complements the industrial elements that can be found here, like the old metal columns and naked bricks.

White painted wooden beams combined with the large windows provide lot of light so the owners even painted some walls in black with a great result.

source

nordic loft with industrial elements and bohemian style
nordic loft with industrial elements and bohemian style
nordic loft with industrial elements and bohemian style
nordic loft with industrial elements and bohemian style
nordic loft with industrial elements and bohemian style
nordic loft with industrial elements and bohemian style
nordic loft with industrial elements and bohemian style
nordic loft with industrial elements and bohemian style
nordic loft with industrial elements and bohemian style
nordic loft with industrial elements and bohemian style

Source: http://ift.tt/Pmwj8P

Toxic City Music

NYC based artist Evan Caminiti breathes life into the Dust Editions imprint with the release of Toxic City Music. Caminiti has explored electro-acoustic music since the mid 2000’s, the latest transmission being 2015’s Meridian. While that album was Caminiti’s first to omit electric guitar, he has now returned to the instrument. Here it is buried it in an electronic mist and melted down, it’s sonic fabric reshaped.

Toxic City Music was inspired by the psychic and physical toxicity of life in late capitalism. Conceived throughout 2015 and 2016, Caminiti captured the sounds of NYC’s machinery and voices before weaving them into his studio experiments. This collection of song mutations unravels in hazy plumes and serrated edges; concrète sounds mesh with disembodied strings and corrosive electronics on “Joaquin”, drones ripple under stuttering rhythms and crude synth detritus throughout “NYC Ego”. On “Toxic Tape (Love Canal)”, layers of digital degradation smear guitar clusters, dissolving into a dubby devotional-ambient space.

Recorded and produced by Evan Caminiti. Featuring Jefre Cantu-Ledesma on “Joaquin”. Additional production and mixdowns by Rafael Anton Irisarri at Black Knoll Studios.

Mastered and cut by Rashad Becker at Dubplates and Mastering.

Artwork by Evan Caminiti.

credits

Released March 3, 2017


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James Lager’s Leica An Illustrated History are the Books Every Leica Fan Needs to Own

There are lots of books covering the famous red dot from Germany, and most Leica fans are dedicated enough that their shelves hold more than a few of these, but there’s just one set that every real Leicaphile (and any true photo geek) needs to own. It’s James Lager’s three-volume Leica An Illustrated History, and the collected volumes are without a doubt the prettiest, most exhaustive, and best-researched books on Leica you can buy today.

Before you dismiss the praise as needless hyperbole and assume these books are just your run-of-the-mill camera book, give us a chance to explain.

James Lager isn’t your average photo geek. As a Past President of the Leica Historical Society of America, and with a career at Leitz New York and an incomparable passion for the brand (he mortgaged his house to fund the production of these books), he’s spent the better part of his adult life working with, on, or around Leica cameras, and is now considered the foremost expert on all things Leica. Which makes sense. The three volumes he produced examine every product the brand had made up to the time of their publication, including lenses and accessories, which populate Volumes 2 and 3 respectively. And there’s no dearth of coverage here. Consider this – the M3 section shows no fewer than 73 photos. Pretty amazing.





Volume 1 concerns itself with the cameras, and it covers everything from the legendary Ur-Leica (the Oskar Barnack-designed prototype from 1913) through the screw-mount models, the M series, as well as the Leicaflex and R series SLRs. We’re also treated to in-depth examinations of the rarest Leicas, including military models and experimental designs, which are just about the most interesting machines you may ever see (some only in this book). In 318 pages, we’re taken on an unmatched journey through the legacy of one of the most historically important and relevant companies in photographic history in a way that’s accessible, thorough, and somehow not boring (let’s face it, some of these camera texts can get a little bit lost in the weeds). Gorgeous photos, the bulk of which were taken by Lager with (of course) a Leica, wonderful writing, and incredible production value has really culminated in what is essentially the best book on Leica cameras ever made.

Volume 2 concerns itself with the lenses, and is similarly stunning. The same quality, attention to detail, and fantastic photography found in Volume 1 populate its pages. Every lens up to the time of publication (1994) is covered. Volume 3 concerns itself with accessories, and this talks about everything from motor drives to display stands. If you can guess from Volumes 1 and 2, yes, it’s stunningly presented and incredibly exhaustive.




The books sport leather bindings and slip cases, gold embossing, and thick, luxurious pages. They’re an enormous 9 1/2″ x 11″, hardcover, and made to last. The only downside? They were limited editions, and not in the “limited to as many as we can sell” kind of limited editions so many brands put out these days. These are truly rare, and prices are naturally higher than the average photo book.

For me, they’re worth the price. The three-volume set is a must-own for anyone concerned with classic cameras and Leica in particular. They’re an invaluable resource for collectors, buyers, and sellers, as well as simply a wonderful tome to browse if, like me, you can’t quite justify the price of owning some of the more exotic Leicas found in these pages.

Want your own copy of Lager’s books?

Find them on eBay

Find them on Amazon

Browse B&H Photo’s book shop

Casual Photophile is on ElloFacebookInstagram, and Youtube

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Tycho Autumn European Tour

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EU AUTUMN 2017 TOUR
19 OCT – Dublin, IE – District 8
22 OCT – London, UK – The Roundhouse
24 OCT – Barcelona, ES – Razzmatazz 2
25 OCT – Toulouse, FR – Bikini
27 OCT – Bologna, IT – Estragon
28 OCT – Turin, IT – Movement Festival
30 OCT – Basel, CH – Kaserne
31 OCT – Zurich, CH – Plaza
01 NOV – Antwerp, BE – Trix
02 NOV – Utrecht, NL – Tivoli
04 NOV – Copenhagen, DK – DR Koncerthuset
09 NOV – Moscow, RU – Izvestia Hall

Tickets here


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