Geronimo Surrenders

Geronimo_surrenders_March_1886

During his last days at Fort Sill, Oklahoma, Geronimo became one of the most photographed of all Native Americans. He became a tourist attraction, and once even photographed in a car. It was therefore fitting that his titanic struggle against the United States army created “the only known photographs of American Indians as enemy in the field”.

Born Goyathlay (The-One-Who-Yawns), the Apache Geronimo was among the fiercest opponents of Mexico and the United States. His family was killed by Mexicans, and he waged intermittent warfare in the south-west until the mid-1880s. By the time, even the clairvoyant medicine man himself knew the end was near. He sent word to General George Crook — America’s most aggressive Indian fighter — that he was ready to surrender.

He chose the site: Cañon de los Embudos in the Sierra Madre Mountains, just south of the Mexico-Arizona border. It was a shallow ravine from which he could flee easily at the first sign of trouble. Geronimo came with his remaining troops, now numbering only 115. As demanded, Crook arrived with a small group of officers, scouts, interpreters, and a photographer, Camillus Fly.

During the three days Geronimo and Crook negotiated, Fly walked around the Apache camp and took photos. Finally, Geronimo agreed to Crook’s surrender terms, with historic words: “Once I moved about like the wind. Now I surrender to you and that is all.”  However, later that night, camp rumours abounded that they would be murdered as they crossed the border back into Arizona, and Geronimo and 40 of his followers slipped away during the night. Five more months of fighting followed. It was the last Indian war the United States was to fight.

As for Fry, he took 15 photos at the camp, including those of Geronimo with his two sons, and of a white boy abducted from his New Mexico home previous September. Fly was just 36 when he took these photos. Seven years earlier, he had moved to silver-boom town of Tombstone, Arizona to open a “portrait-making” shop. In 1881, he was a peripheral eyewitness to a mythic event which took place in the vacant lot by his photography studio (and not in the livery stable six doors away as frequently mis-remembered): The Gunfight at the O.K. Corral.

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Artists Calling – The Interview

"The Interview"
Deadline: 1 May 2017
Application fee: $15

Interview-retitle

Artists Calling wants to feature an artist on its upcoming new website. The publication will include an interview and samples of her or his work and projects. It will be an extensive article published in English.

Artists Calling will disseminate the interview amongst various contemporary art platforms and online magazines so the artist’s work gets as much visibility as possible.

Artists Calling’s goal is to support and give visibility to talented artists from throughout the world. It also aims to disseminate opportunities for artists.

Eligibility:

Painting, drawing, sculpture, video, photography, installation, performance and mixed media are eligible. All artists from any country or age at any stages of their careers may apply.

Deadline:

1st May 2017

Conditions:

  • Both individual artists and collectives may apply
  • Deadline for applications: 1st May 2017
  • Application fee: $15

Application:

  • Please complete the online form you’ll find on our website: http://ift.tt/2no9RQ5
  • Send 5 jpg files of your works (2000px on the longest side) to artistscalling@gmail.com.
  • Pay the application fee via PayPal.
  • Send any questions you may have to artistscalling@gmail.com.

 

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Sites We Like: Lost My Name & Oakland Public Library

For many of us working in type, our love of words and reading started early. Today’s profiled sites share that theme, along with thoughtful type selections that we hope will inspire the next generation of type designers, too.

Lost My Name

Lost My Name website

Lost My Name is the title of just one of the books you can personalize from this fun website. The adorable illustrations clearly steal the show here, but we do love Adelle Sans for the friendly-looking and well-balanced text throughout — with just a few uses of Freight Text for a serif counterpart.

Lost My Name website page detail

Oakland Public Library

Oakland Public Library website

We were delighted to find Proxima Nova on the Oakland Public Library website. The sans is a popular choice for good reason: it’s incredibly flexible no matter how much information you have to display, and it has an unflappably friendly, open feel to it.

Oakland Public Library website page detail

That’s it for this week. Share sites you like in the comments!

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The Merc: Exterior, Weird Property Lines, Zoning, and Neighbors

Are you guys ready to get into the nitty gritty details of the Merc?! This is obviously very different than buying a home and there are SO many unusual things that factor into being able to convert a commercially zoned building into a house.

Zoning was the first thing that I (like many of you!) wondered about. Having attended a Planning Commission meeting (or 7) in my days I knew that the process to get zoning changed would not be an easy one. Especially because the Merc is very literally the only historic commercial building in Santa Clara.  We involved the city from the very beginning and they said that changing zoning was really not an option.  What we found out was as good of news as possible. The Merc is zoned Commercial Mixed Use, which means that you can live in it, as long as at least part of the building is a commercial business!! (The happiest dance commenced after finding out this news. Though it did complicate things in other ways that we’ll talk about soon)  The reason the Merc is zoned like this is because there was a house on the property that was torn down around 1995. To be able to live in it, we had to present all of our plans (floor plans, site plans, elevations, parking etc.) to the Planning Commission for a conditional use permit. From what I understand, you just need to define exactly what the mixed use will be, and then the city needs to approve the use. (We’ve already crossed this hurdle and received our conditional use permit, but that won’t be until a little later in the story!)

The next hurdle was if we were going to turn it into a home, what about our yard and place for the kids to play?

The property lines for this area are SO weird. They literally run against the building completely on one side and 90% of the way on the other. In fact, the building encroaches on the neighbors property to the west by about a foot, so there is an easement that goes along with it. We’ll talk more about the easement in its own post because it made us almost not buy it.

All of our property is highlighted yellow. The reason for the weird property line/buidling situation is that the LDS church owned the property to the west and when they decided to sell it in 1927 one of the requirements was that the new owners let the Hafen’s build the Merc on the front portion of the property. That’s why the lines run directly against the building.

 

The exterior isn’t in the greatest shape, there’s been quite a few patches and additions

 

There are 3 back doors, but only 1 opens onto our property (the one on the far right) our property line is where the pavement is against the building and goes straight back.

 

There is a garage/workshop on the back side of the parking lot.

 

Behind that is a large open area that has covered parking stalls. It was used for parking but this is what will be our yard. Because its been vacant for so long, the trees that are on the property line are wild and there is a lot of things that will need to be removed (like the dumpster) but eventually its going to be pretty great!!

A lot of you had questions about living on Main Street and what the ratio was with commercial vs residential. I feel like there could not be a more perfect place. The reality is that a store wouldn’t have existed in some remote lot away from everything and everyone, so yes it is on main street. Thats just what happens when the building is almost 100 years old.

But, Santa Clara Drive is LITERALLY the CUTEST MAIN STREET EVER. There are giant 100+ yr old Sycamore trees lining the street on both sides, not to mention all of the great landscaping that the city has done. Its like driving into a fairytale. There are cute shops and a fruit market right down the road, and so many adorable old houses. If you’ve ever driven on Santa Clara Dr. you are nodding your head in agreement right now, aren’t you!? We’re talking Stars Hollow quaint here people. There is no way that you could live in a building like this on Main St. in St. George because its so heavily commercial but Santa Clara is practically perfect in every way!

There are houses all around the Merc, and with the exception of a few, all of the businesses are in old houses. Here’s a shot of google maps, I’ve circled where the Merc is. As you can see, there are WAY more houses than businesses.

Look at how cute it is from the ariel view! So many trees!!!

The last question that you guys asked (that we asked ourselves!) was what does it look like to live in a house that has GIANT WINDOWS on a main street. While we aren’t at that point in the story yet, I’m going to put your fears to rest and let you know that we’ve figured out a really great solution with our floor plan! Stay tuned!!

Do you have any more questions related to zoning, the neighborhood, property usage etc. that I didn’t address? Leave them below and I’ll answer them!

The post The Merc: Exterior, Weird Property Lines, Zoning, and Neighbors appeared first on Vintage Revivals.

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BT’s Phobos is a scifi synthesizer using something called polyconvolution

We’ve reached a new era in software instruments. For years, designers had produced instruments that either relied primarily on sampled sound, reproducing existing acoustic instruments, or worked mainly with synthesized sound and short wavetables, like a typical synth. What’s happening now is we’re getting a bumper crop of hybrid instruments – ones that use extensive multi-gig sample libraries and combine them with synthesis and processing to form sounds that hadn’t existed before.

I’ve written at some length about the approach of LA-based Output on these lines – and relied on their instruments when under painfully short deadlines, in particular. Now, we hear from the UK’s Spitfire, a sample house on the other side of the pond.

Producer BT (Brian Transeau) is working on this particular outing – but no stutter effects here; this is all about lush, strange science fiction sounds.

The developers call this a “polyconvolution” synth. So what does that mean? Well, there are three independent convolution processes in each patch – referring to a technique for digitally combining two recorded sounds. That’s a technique often associated with reverbs, because it’s well-suited to that – convolving a source with an impulse response recorded in a space is theoretically equivalent to having your source playing in that space. But you can also combine other tonal and rhythmic materials. For Phobos, that means a bunch of rhythms get convolved with a bunch of tonal materials for otherworldly results.

To those three convolution voices, you additionally get lots of morphing and so on – the idea being that you hear organic transformations of sound rather than repetitive loops.

And what’s nicest is that all of this – from the more conventional envelope/gate controls to advanced convolution and morphing settings – are neatly organized around a clear interface. As with some of the other newer sound tools

smc0073_gui1-960

There are nearly 2500 samples there, for a total of around 23 GB of data, so while you get loads of presets to get you going, there’s no shortage of possibilities for customization.

This isn’t a review – I’ve just gotten my hands on this library myself. So I’ll let you know how it goes. I’m… behind Richard Devine, again. (Yes, Rich did some presets. Of course.)

In the meanwhile, there’s both an evocative trailer and a more detailed walkthrough showing you how this works.

I’m very keen to try getting beyond the stuff contained in the presets to see how flexible this is as a custom sound design tool. So watch for that in the review.

But clearly, as people look to outboard gear with knobs and such for more conventional synth sounds, now is the computer’s time to shine as a futuristic sample-based workstation.

Phobos is available as a standalone instrument and plug-in for Mac, Windows, and Pro Tools, at an intro price of €239 including VAT.

Spitfire Audio: BT Phobos

The post BT’s Phobos is a scifi synthesizer using something called polyconvolution appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Source: http://cdm.link

Sites We Like: Lost My Name & Oakland Public Library

For many of us working in type, our love of words and reading started early. Today’s profiled sites share that theme, along with thoughtful type selections that we hope will inspire the next generation of type designers, too.

Lost My Name

Lost My Name website

Lost My Name is the title of just one of the books you can personalize from this fun website. The adorable illustrations clearly steal the show here, but we do love Adelle Sans for the friendly-looking and well-balanced text throughout — with just a few uses of Freight Text for a serif counterpart.

Lost My Name website page detail

Oakland Public Library

Oakland Public Library website

We were delighted to find Proxima Nova on the Oakland Public Library website. The sans is a popular choice for good reason: it’s incredibly flexible no matter how much information you have to display, and it has an unflappably friendly, open feel to it.

Oakland Public Library website page detail

That’s it for this week. Share sites you like in the comments!

Source: http://ift.tt/2jd5QiI

Editors’ Picks: The Best Everyday Watches Of Baselworld 2017

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The Baselworld dust is starting to settle and the show is officially over. Thousands of new watches were shown, in basically every size, color, shape, and price, and they’ll slowly be making their way to retailers and wrists over the coming months. Luckily, our team of editors were taking frantic notes and tons of photos, trying to sort out which watches are most worth your time right now. Here, each editor picks their favorite everyday watch and explains why you might need to strap one on yourself.

Cara Barrett – NOMOS Glashütte Club Campus

nomos club campus 36mm

While this may be a predictable choice, the watch itself is anything but. This year NOMOS really brought the heat with the Club Campus collection, which offers three variations with Califonia dials and reasonable prices. Furthermore, the watch comes in two sizes, 36mm and 38mm. For me, it’s all about the 36mm version with an off-white dial and dusty rose indexes. Besides the fact that it’s pink (my new favorite color), this watch wears really well and with the manually-wound Alpha movement, you really can’t go wrong.

$1,500; nomos-store.com

Ben Clymer – Rolex Datejust 41mm In Steel

rolex datejust 41mm steel

Sometimes it’s the basic stuff that’s best. The new 41mm stainless steel Datejust might not have been the most head-turning watch at Baselworld, but it’s easily one of the best. You can really make it your own too, with different dial colors, either a flat or fluted bezel, and either a Jubilee or Oyster bracelet. Beyond that, inside is the caliber 3235, which is a chronometer-certified movement that runs to -2/+2 seconds per day and has a 70-hour power reserve. This is the best of modern Rolex tech in one of the most classic Rolex packages. Tough to beat, if you ask me.

From $6,300; rolex.com

Jack Forster – Grand Seiko SBGW253

Grand Seiko SBGW253

As I wrote in our introductory coverage of the trilogy of Grand Seikos launched this year to celebrate the establishment of Grand Seiko as an independent brand, this might be the best time-only steel watch out there right now. The fit and finish are achingly good and the design is so clean that it transcends the idea of design itself.

$5,700; grand-seiko.us.com

Stephen Pulvirent – Tudor Black Bay 41

Tudor Black Bay 41

When Tudor gets it right, Tudor gets it very, very right. The Black Bay 41 is essentially just a larger version of last year’s Black Bay 36, which is why it’s so great. This is a slim watch with a hyper-legible dial that looks good on a strap or a bracelet. It’s reasonably priced and has just the right amount of vintage nostalgia baked in. At the end of the day, I’m probably still a 36 kind of guy more than a 41 kind of guy, but for a lot of people this will be the only watch they’ll ever need.

$2,625 (strap), $2,950 (bracelet); tudorwatch.com

Arthur Touchot – Bulgari Octo Finissimo Automatique

Bulgari Octo Finissimo Automatique

The Octo Finissimo Automatique is the kind of luxury sports watch that you’d probably expect more from someone like Audemars Piguet than you would from Bulgari. It features the thinnest self-winding movement currently in production, tucked inside the very masculine, faceted case of the Octo Finissimo line. It’s thin (obviously), but the titanium case and bracelet also make it feel impossibly light. With watches like this, Bulgari is converting purists left, right and center – myself included.

$13,000; bulgari.com

Louis Westphalen – Omega Railmaster 60th Anniversary

Omega Railmaster 60th Anniversary

Some watches take you by surprise the first time you wear them, and this is exactly what the Omega Railmaster 60th Anniversary did to me. It was a very positive surprise, I might add, as I immediately adopted this watch as my own (in my mind, at least). The thin profile, the 38mm diameter, and the balanced dial instantly did the trick for me, while the two additional straps and the magnetic resistance were among the sweet bonus points I discovered afterwards. It’s a vintage watch, only modern. No arguments there.

$6,300; omegawatches.com

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Introducing Flickr for the Future

The internet is an ever-changing world, and as technology products become increasingly interactive, text fields are falling by the wayside. With over 12 billion photos on Flickr, we are excited to announce that we are doubling down on the visual Awesomeness™ of our community.

As part of our mission to provide a legit visual experience for our members, we’re introducing the first new Flickr for the Future feature: Reaction GIFs. If a picture is worth a thousand words, then a GIF has to be worth at least 5,000. Right?

In lieu of text comments, reactions also eliminate the need for translations. Now members from all over the world can come together through reactions to each others’ photos. The introduction of Reaction GIFs in the comment section will be the first step towards an image-only version of Flickr, because words simply aren’t enough anymore.

Here’s How Flickr Reaction GIFs Work:

Click

Click on the ‘Post A Flickr Reaction’ button at the top of the comment section. You will need to allow access to your computer’s built-in camera.

React

When the popup window comes up, a 5-second countdown will begin. Hurry up! Get ready! You will have 3 seconds to react while a video records. Once the video records, it will automatically process and post a GIF comment, saving the photo privately to your Camera Roll.

Lol*

Enjoy the reaction! Show just how much ‘wow’ or ‘awwwwwwww’ someone’s photo leaves you with. If you wish to redo or replace the reaction, simply delete the comment and create a new one.

 

Whether you’re a Flickr power user or a noob, we know you’ll enjoy the GIF update. Everyone loves updates! Feel free to send us any feedback you have so we can improve the transition to Flickr for the Future.

 

*Reaction GIFs are subject to the Flickr Community Guidelines and our Terms of Service.

Source: http://blog.flickr.net

[ARTICLE] Squaring the Circle: Seventen Telephone Keypad Layouts that Could Have Been

It might seem obvious or even inevitable that numbers on a telephone would be laid out from left to right and top to bottom in a gird. In fact, that familiar design configuration was the product of a great deal of thought and research done back in the 1950s at Bell Labs. In the video below, Numberphile goes through a brief history of this development process to show how human factors plays a big role in everyday design.

As rotary-dial phones began to be replaced by touch-tone variants, a design challenge (and opportunity) arose around how this new system would work. Rotary telephones could be time-consuming to operate — for those unfamiliar: you had to spin the dial for each number, then let the wheel spin back, repeating the process over and over again. Touch-tone phones would make dialing much faster and easier.

Vintage rotary phone with wheel

The first layout solution proposed was a carryover from existing phones: numbers laid out in a circle. It seemed from the start that this approach might win out in the end. Still, Bell saw this as an opportunity to start from scratch, going back to the drawing board and trying out all kinds of creative alternatives. As such, other variations were explored as well, including calculator-style grids, bowling-alley triangles, stair-like angles, cross-shaped configurations and more. Some may look impractical if not downright silly in hindsight, but Bell wanted to make sure to examine the problem from all possible angles. Their designers came up with eighteen options, all shown below.

Bell Labs had a great many human factors experts, so they started bringing personnel in to brainstorm and test these different ideas. The researchers whittled down the list by seeing how fast and accurately people could type in numbers on different pad arrangements.

In the end, they narrowed it down to five designs, including: the familiar grid which we still use to this day, two circular variants (inspired by existing rotary phones), one with two vertical columns and one with two horizontal rows (each row or column containing five numbers).

Testers expressed a preference for and were able to type faster on the familiar rotary-style ones. They disliked the vertical tower variant but actually made fewer mistakes on it (in part because they were going slower). Performance and preference differences, though, were deemed to be fairly small overall across the five finalists, so for engineering reasons Bell went with the layout we know today.

But there was still a question of where to put the numbers in the grid, so testers were given blank layouts asked to fill them in. What seems familiar to us now was entirely new territory for these people, except the few who had used calculators. Ultimately, 8% of people emulated a calculator layout (789,456,123,0). 7% of participants went down before going right (147,258,369,0). 55% of them went with what might seem the most obvious choice (at least in hindsight): counting from left to right and top down, putting the zero at the bottom (123,456,789,0).

Meanwhile, Numberphile has a great array of geeky math-related videos, some tied to design and others more abstract. You can check out a particularly popular one below or visit their YouTube channel.

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“Spring Awakening” Art Print by Tomer Hanuka (Timed Edition Onsale Info)

Bottleneck Gallery has the latest art print from Tomer Hanuka up in their shop as a timed edition. “Spring Awakening” is a 13″ x 19″ giclee, timed edition, and costs $45. They are available through today (Friday, March 31st) at 1pM EST. Visit their shop.

 

Tomer Hanuka

The post “Spring Awakening” Art Print by Tomer Hanuka (Timed Edition Onsale Info) appeared first on OMG Posters!.

Source: http://omgposters.com